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Victoria’s late-night scene goes country with The Duke Saloon

“We’re not a nightclub. We’re not a club at all. We’re a saloon, and we are welcoming to absolutely everybody.”

The Duke Saloon, summed up by owner Joel Friesen, opens Friday, August 22 in the former Rehab Nightclub space on Discovery Street at Store Street.. [Read more]


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Times Colonist


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Poll: The Times Colonist: Will it survive? (1 member(s) have cast votes)

The Times Colonist: Will it survive?

  1. Yes - The TC will always be here as a daily paper (17 votes [20.99%])

    Percentage of vote: 20.99%

  2. Yes - but not a daily (26 votes [32.10%])

    Percentage of vote: 32.10%

  3. Yes - but Internet only (13 votes [16.05%])

    Percentage of vote: 16.05%

  4. No - it is no longer viable (25 votes [30.86%])

    Percentage of vote: 30.86%

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#1 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 21 January 2009 - 09:18 AM

I don't know what it's width is now, but it'll be 11.5" W starting Feb 3rd.

Height remains the same. And in a clever little play, the number of columns (used to measure ad sizes) remains the same, at 10, they just become smaller. ie. ads will cost the same per line, yet be smaller.

#2 Holden West

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Posted 21 January 2009 - 10:53 AM

That's even narrower than the mid-format Berliner. Only a little wider than Monday Magazine.
"Beaver, ahoy!""The bridge is like a magnet, attracting both pedestrians and over 30,000 vehicles daily who enjoy the views of Victoria's harbour. The skyline may change, but "Big Blue" as some call it, will always be there."
-City of Victoria website, 2009

#3 victorian fan

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Posted 21 January 2009 - 12:36 PM

The Daily Times and the Daily Colonist used the old British broadsheet format.

If the TC has smaller type, I'll need reading glasses.

#4 Roger

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Posted 21 January 2009 - 05:00 PM

I don't know what it's width is now, but it'll be 11.5" W starting Feb 3rd.

Height remains the same. And in a clever little play, the number of columns (used to measure ad sizes) remains the same, at 10, they just become smaller. ie. ads will cost the same per line, yet be smaller.


Measured it at 12.5" so it will be 1" narrower. I guess they decided that with the reduction in reporting quality over the last few years it was also time to reduce the physical size. Save a few bucks on reporters and now save on paper.

If they reduce the type size I imagine many folks will just drop their subscription. Lots of old boomers with reading glasses like me in Victoria.

#5 mat

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Posted 21 January 2009 - 09:00 PM

We received the new TC ad quote protocols and pricing last week - with the new column widths, placements and conversion times it looks like a 5% to 8% rise in prices all at once. (of course the sales people are talking about more readership and retention - bullshit)

When they pass these out to advertisers there should be a direct connection to online advert presence, and either packages, or inclusion, for local (at least) online ads - yet no mention.

#6 Rob Randall

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Posted 21 January 2009 - 09:24 PM

The Times Colonist website mostly features generic garbage ads ("What's your credit score?") or generic national ads for Telus, Royal Bank etc.

The Victoria News (Black Press) has a much better local presence with its online ads.

Still, I don't think any local website really takes advantage of the power of local advertising.

#7 mat

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Posted 21 January 2009 - 09:38 PM

The Times Colonist website mostly features generic garbage ads ("What's your credit score?") or generic national ads for Telus, Royal Bank etc.

The Victoria News (Black Press) has a much better local presence with its online ads.

Still, I don't think any local website really takes advantage of the power of local advertising.


The reason is Canwest prevents local adverts as continuous with print - they sell national ads, outside of local editorial, for online content.

#8 mat

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Posted 02 February 2009 - 03:56 PM

Couple things regarding the TC in recent news:

Canwest announced today it can no longer borrow. The company has not only reached the limit on its credit plan, but the rating has dropped to just about junk status. They will likely try to sell the Aus/NZ arm, but what they do about Canada is up in the air. Media rules mean they cannot sell to a foreign owner, and as ad revenues decline sharply there will be no white knight saviour or local buyer.

Locally, for the TC and Chek, Canwest has cut staff to below 'editorial prime' level - it is unlikely they can layoff any more, without completely up ending the business model, and doing so they will lose more circulation and advert revenue.

On another note - TC in this economic environment really needs to maintain community, organization and business support. The pedantic policy of withdrawing sponsorship for arts and events if a competitor (Black Press, even VV) is giving similar or greater exposure is an anachronism. Organizations look for as much local media attention and support from all outlets - no one other than TC has such restrictive policies, other publications are simply happy to help, and get equal listings.

#9 Holden West

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 04:24 PM

The TC is back to its old width today but the content is at the new narrow width so there are blank margins on the sides. I guess they still had newsprint at the old width?
"Beaver, ahoy!""The bridge is like a magnet, attracting both pedestrians and over 30,000 vehicles daily who enjoy the views of Victoria's harbour. The skyline may change, but "Big Blue" as some call it, will always be there."
-City of Victoria website, 2009

#10 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 08:36 PM

The TC is back to its old width today but the content is at the new narrow width so there are blank margins on the sides. I guess they still had newsprint at the old width?


I talked to one of the guys that prints it, he said is was a major, and expensive job to narrow it, and they have been working on it for many weeks. Surprised they can go back and forth.

#11 Holden West

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 09:33 PM

I wish they would use those blank margins to print Sergio Aragonés cartoons.
"Beaver, ahoy!""The bridge is like a magnet, attracting both pedestrians and over 30,000 vehicles daily who enjoy the views of Victoria's harbour. The skyline may change, but "Big Blue" as some call it, will always be there."
-City of Victoria website, 2009

#12 mat

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 04:19 PM

CP put up a news alert around 2pm that Canwest may not meet today's deadline to re-negotiate its credit line.

Employees at Canwest and its flagship National Post daily in Toronto have expressed private concerns that the publication could be forced to close as the parent company deals with its debt troubles. But company representative Phyllise Gelfand said "It's business as usual."
'I'm in the same building and they (Post employees) look busy putting the paper together," Gelfand said in an interview.
She also declined to comment on whether Canwest was making any changes to its operations.


They have made a partial sale of the sports venture 'The Score' but that will not be enough to satisfy creditors.

It will be interesting to see how this plays out - if the credit lines are frozen (which is likely), then all operations, like the TC, will have around one months operating cash to keep going.

What is happening with Canwest is exactly the same as Hearst - bankers cut the credit line for Hearst newspapers last week and The San Fran Chronicle has one month to find a buyer, or close. (Rocky Mountain Press...et al are similar)

We may be witnessing the end of local media as we know it.

Edit 1640 - News from CP. Canwest has announced an extended period until March 11th to renegotiate financing. Credit line has been permanently cut from $300m to $112m, with $92m already borrowed.

#13 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 04:25 PM

CP put up a news alert around 2pm that Canwest may not meet today's deadline to re-negotiate its credit line.



They have made a partial sale of the sports venture 'The Score' but that will not be enough to satisfy creditors.

It will be interesting to see how this plays out - if the credit lines are frozen (which is likely), then all operations, like the TC, will have around one months operating cash to keep going.

What is happening with Canwest is exactly the same as Hearst - bankers cut the credit line for Hearst newspapers last week and The San Fran Chronicle has one month to find a buyer, or close. (Rocky Mountain Press...et al are similar)

We may be witnessing the end of local media as we know it.

Edit 1640 - News from CP. Canwest has announced an extended period until March 11th to renegotiate financing. Credit line has been permanently cut from $300m to $112m, with $92m already borrowed.


I have talked to several TC staffers over the last week, they are really scared.

#14 mat

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 05:19 PM

I have talked to several TC staffers over the last week, they are really scared.


Canwest print Publishers and chief editors have 11 days now to agree on general harsh cutbacks. Operating costs will have to be slashed if the papers are to continue under any new Canwest/Asper family arrangements, or prepped for a quick sale (and this includes the TC - even though it is essentially breaking even)

What we might see -

1) Going to only 2 smaller weekly editions, and a bigger Saturday paper.
2) Cutting print altogether - going online only.
3) Centralizing all city papers into one regional (BC) office - local journalism would come from freelance 'stringers.
4) Publishing only one provincial paper (TC, VanSun, Province et al amalgamate)
5) Closing or selling all regional papers (Courier, Richmond news - 12 others around BC)

If the above does not meet creditors expectations then my feeling is the TC will close.

#15 Sue Woods

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 07:03 PM

3) Centralizing all city papers into one regional (BC) office - local journalism would come from freelance 'stringers.


The way things used to be - before multi national media giants (Globe Media, Canwest, and CTV) made offers no one could refuse.

I have often wondered how long the system would hold up - local media being very much a community commodity - not a Kentucky Fried Chicken or MacDonalds franchise where one size fits all.

I think most daily papers will be gone by the end of this year - but independant community papers (weekly, bi-weeklies)will survive as they take up the slack - at least as far as their boomer and senior audience is concerned. People like paper records.

#16 Caramia

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 07:11 PM

I've always wondered at the TC business model. In my current job, I take ads out almost weekly in either Monday or the Vic News Group - and almost never in the TC because ad space in the TC is too expensive to be worth it for a paper that will only be read for one day.
Nowadays most people die of a sort of creeping common sense, and discover when it is too late that the only things one never regrets are one's mistakes.
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#17 mat

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 08:09 PM

I've always wondered at the TC business model. In my current job, I take ads out almost weekly in either Monday or the Vic News Group - and almost never in the TC because ad space in the TC is too expensive to be worth it for a paper that will only be read for one day.


Both you and Sue make very good points regarding advertising - taking out a week long ad in the TC is expensive for most small businesses, and the weekly model often works better.

Although we are an 'on-line' family, the Saanich News hangs around in the living room and we often go over it for shopping coupons and specials. The local papers are just that - local news: events, community, crime and politics. It will be interesting to see how Black Press picks up the slack from a TC demise - certainly there will be allot of editorial and journalistic talent looking for work.

#18 Sue Woods

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 08:14 PM

I've always wondered at the TC business model. In my current job, I take ads out almost weekly in either Monday or the Vic News Group - and almost never in the TC because ad space in the TC is too expensive to be worth it for a paper that will only be read for one day.


I know. The prices are unbelievable. $6,000 to 10,000 for a large ad for one day!

Its like the Yellow Pages too.

Pricing themselves out of the market seems an apt expression.

#19 Sue Woods

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 08:22 PM

Although we are an 'on-line' family, the Saanich News hangs around in the living room and we often go over it for shopping coupons and specials.


Not to mention the News Group of papers are delivered to the door free.

A few months ago the TC was giving away free three month subscriptions with no strings attached. I guess in an effort to pump up their distribution numbers for sale attractability.

#20 mat

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 08:26 PM

I know. The prices are unbelievable. $6,000 to 10,000 for a large ad for one day!

Its like the Yellow Pages too.

Pricing themselves out of the market seems an apt expression.


Off topic, but relevant. Yellow pages should have gone long ago - what a waste. The super of an apartment building I was visiting was dumping over 40 yellow page books into the dumpster- and I hear the same from all over, no one wants them.

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