Jump to content

      













Photo

Moss Street Paint-In


  • Please log in to reply
48 replies to this topic

#1 Rob Randall

Rob Randall
  • Member
  • 10,374 posts

Posted 18 July 2008 - 08:55 PM

Come on down Saturday to the Moss Street Paint In and say hi to yours truly. I'll be setting my easel near the art gallery. Here's the schedule:

TD Canada Trust Moss Street Paint-In

The Art Gallery's 21st Annual - Saturday, July 19, 2008
Paint-In: 12noon - 4:00 pm
Free Gallery admission: 10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Food & Beverage Garden: 12noon - 9:00 pm
Dancing to Kumbia: 4:00pm - 9:00 pm

"[Randall's] aesthetic poll was more accurate than his political acumen"

-Tom Hawthorne, Toronto Globe and Mail


#2 gumgum

gumgum
  • Member
  • 7,069 posts

Posted 18 July 2008 - 09:32 PM

^I'll be there! Should be a great event as usual.

How do you get "invited" as one of the artists involved in the paint-in?

#3 Rob Randall

Rob Randall
  • Member
  • 10,374 posts

Posted 18 July 2008 - 10:38 PM

I was invited but artists can apply for a space as well.

"[Randall's] aesthetic poll was more accurate than his political acumen"

-Tom Hawthorne, Toronto Globe and Mail


#4 Rob Randall

Rob Randall
  • Member
  • 10,374 posts

Posted 18 July 2009 - 09:03 AM

Today is the Moss St. Paint In presented by the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria.

I'll be set up on upper Moss nearish to the the gallery noon to four. Come on by and say hi.

"[Randall's] aesthetic poll was more accurate than his political acumen"

-Tom Hawthorne, Toronto Globe and Mail


#5 AnonAnnie2

AnonAnnie2
  • Member
  • 151 posts

Posted 18 July 2009 - 02:06 PM

Today is the Moss St. Paint In presented by the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria.

I'll be set up on upper Moss nearish to the the gallery noon to four. Come on by and say hi.


Great to meet you Rob! and I very much enjoyed your work.

The even was packed! tons of people, great to see so many folks out.

I did get a couple of nice shots...literally a couple. I don't like taking pictures of other peoples art...seems like stealing to me (what are your thoughts on that?) ...well except for spray painted walls and such. :D

see urbanpatina.ca for the two that I liked. Heading back down at the dinner hour...different light and such.

#6 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Suspended User
  • 52,121 posts

Posted 18 July 2009 - 02:34 PM

Ah, yes. Once again, massive crowds for a free event. Now, don't get me wrong, I love the Paint In concept, but I wonder how the number would be if it was just $2 per person with a similar event...

#7 Jill

Jill
  • Member
  • 1,039 posts

Posted 18 July 2009 - 03:20 PM

I was able to look at your work briefly, Rob, before having to keep moving to mollify a child anxious to get to his favourite painter (Ted Harrison). My husband and I both really liked your paintings of houses we would otherwise consider unremarkable.

I love the Paint In. I remember being quite taken aback a couple of years ago to compare the amount of money the AGGV raised that day with the number of people who attended. Unless I'm horribly mistaken, I think it worked out to a donation of 25 cents per person. No wonder the event had a major corporate sponsor this year.

#8 Nparker

Nparker
  • Member
  • 23,795 posts

Posted 18 July 2009 - 04:07 PM

Ah, yes. Once again, massive crowds for a free event. Now, don't get me wrong, I love the Paint In concept, but I wonder how the number would be if it was just $2 per person with a similar event...


My guess is the numbers would drop at least in half. Victorians are notorious cheapskates. Same goes for Symphony Splash, Canada Day fireworks etc.

#9 Ms. B. Havin

Ms. B. Havin
  • Member
  • 5,052 posts

Posted 18 July 2009 - 06:29 PM

I don't understand why some of you have a hate-on for Victorians' love of free events.

One of the greatest free events in the US is the Fourth of July Boston Pops Concert on the Charles River Esplanade, followed by fireworks in time to Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture. The event is televised nationally, and it's a treasure. And it's totally and utterly free for the attendees who brave 90+ degree temperatures, bringing lawn chairs and blankets early to secure a spot.

What's wrong with free? Nothing. Free is great.

What's wrong with Victoria is that free isn't marketed properly. The Symphony Splash, for example, should be televised nationally by CBC, and further to that, it should take place on the First of July. It should be for Canada what the Boston Pops is for the US.

But oh no, we're much too f*ckin' modest for that, eh?

PS/ Edit: compare the Pops website to what Vic Symphony (search for splash). Hint: we could make a lot more out of this, we can make a lot more out of free. That's the economy of the future. Free is good.
When you buy a game, you buy the rules. Play happens in the space between the rules.

#10 mat

mat
  • Member
  • 2,070 posts

Posted 18 July 2009 - 07:08 PM

agreed with MS B on this one - there is a pervasive attitude among some contributors here that 'free' events somehow represent less value. Free means accessibility: put on an open Jazz or Classical music event and it allows people who might never consider attending a concert, out of musical preference or financial considerations, to be part of the audience.

We always do a free Sunday event as part of the annual Pacific Baroque Festival. This year over 800 people came to the Sunday 'Baroque' Even Song at Christ Church Cathedral - lots of families with children. It's a great way to generate interest for a niche musical event.

#11 Ms. B. Havin

Ms. B. Havin
  • Member
  • 5,052 posts

Posted 18 July 2009 - 07:13 PM

"It's a great way to generate interest for a niche musical event" and if you're smart, it's a great entry into making actual money (again: see Boston Pops, national importance, etc etc etc).

It's not dirty, to succeed. You wouldn't know that around here, sometimes.
When you buy a game, you buy the rules. Play happens in the space between the rules.

#12 gumgum

gumgum
  • Member
  • 7,069 posts

Posted 18 July 2009 - 08:09 PM

The paint in is an incredible event and gets better every year. Keep in mind that most ppl are happy to drop a few bucks into the drop boxes. I'm willing to bet it equals more than a couple of bucks per person. I gave over 5, but was planning on heading back and give more but didn't make it because of other commitments. I have more than just a passing interest in the thing but I'm sure most Victorian's aren't as cheap as other have mentioned.

#13 Ms. B. Havin

Ms. B. Havin
  • Member
  • 5,052 posts

Posted 18 July 2009 - 08:21 PM

I think Victorians are cheap. But so is everyone. I don't think Victorians are especially cheap. Being cheap is not special at all.

It's normal.
When you buy a game, you buy the rules. Play happens in the space between the rules.

#14 Ms. B. Havin

Ms. B. Havin
  • Member
  • 5,052 posts

Posted 18 July 2009 - 08:51 PM

Just one more thing on the issue of cheap.

In Boston, being cheap (shlepping lawn chairs to the Esplanade, broiling in the sun all day long, putting up with gonzo exiting strategies when the concert is over - MBTA packed to capacity in every direction, all roads clogged with cars, etc etc) to hear the Boston Pops play the 4th of July concert is celebrated as an embodiment of the spirit of '76, the spirit of New England, the spirit of Boston - and lo!, it's marketed to the rest of the country as an essential component of Americana that's celebrated coast to coast. It is taken as proof positive of love of country or place.

Here, we have Symphony Splash - a beloved event (proof positive of love) - and it's downplayed (instead of up-played) as an event for cheapskates, for people who don't want to spend serious coin on culture.

Give your heads a shake. Symphony Splash could be so much more. Just because it's free doesn't mean it's not valuable.

Combine it with July 1st. Make it a family event the way Boston Pops on the Esplanade is. Get the CBC to televise it coast to coast. Make Victoria into a kind of "Boston" of Canada: history, culture, heritage, etc., with an Asian twist to boot. Get the whole damn country to tune in to watch Symphony Splash in Victoria on Canada Day.

For free.

And if you don't know how to make coin out of that, it's your own damn fault.

When you buy a game, you buy the rules. Play happens in the space between the rules.

#15 Phil McAvity

Phil McAvity
  • Member
  • 1,238 posts

Posted 18 July 2009 - 09:25 PM

I think Victorians are cheap. But so is everyone. I don't think Victorians are especially cheap. Being cheap is not special at all.

It's normal.


At Boston Pizza the other day I noticed a sign that said "Gratuity of 15% included with groups of 10 or more." My experience is that when big groups of people go out to eat, some of them will try and hide their cheapness (if not dishonesty) amongst the crowd, all because they can (usually) get away with it.

Pretty sad.


P.S.-I hate digressers. :D
In chains by Keynes

#16 gumgum

gumgum
  • Member
  • 7,069 posts

Posted 18 July 2009 - 09:28 PM

This is getting off topic, but I am a little sick of the "Victorians are cheap" crap. And this has been the theme of many discussions everywhere on this forum.

It pretty much costs more to live in Victoria than anywhere else in Canada. After you've made your mortgage payments, paid for your groceries, and then paid your tax bills, there's not much else left most of the time! I mean, day to day cost of living, I'm pretty sure it would be cheaper to live in Vancouver - the touted most expensive city in Canada.

Are we cheap or are we living in an expensive city? I think most would nod to the latter.

Yes there are cheap people here. But as you say, Miss B, are these cheap people any different than people from other places?

#17 Mike K.

Mike K.
  • Administrator
  • 50,926 posts

Posted 19 July 2009 - 10:06 AM

Went to the paint in yesterday for the first time. Loved it :)

I observed a lot of frustration near the end when the police swooped in to chase everyone off the road and onto sidewalks, followed by irritated drivers forcing their way through the crowds. In turn, pedestrians were upset because for hours the street was their domain and all of a sudden it became an auto thoroughfare.

If anything, this event drives home the point that we need a pedestrian only street in this city. The atmosphere created by a car free zone really is something.

Know it all.
Citified.ca is Victoria's most comprehensive research resource for new-build homes and commercial spaces.


#18 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Suspended User
  • 52,121 posts

Posted 19 July 2009 - 10:41 AM

Ya, OK, retrace my posts over the years on this topic, I have never said "Victorians" are cheap - I have always said people are cheap.

I have no problem with free events, some are great. I have a curiosity with the way people's minds work. They have no problem spending $8 in gas to get to a free event, the $8 in gas doesn't seem to register with them. They think spending $4 in gas and 45 minutes to save 3 cents/litre on a tank is worth the effort, time and cost.

Same as food bank drives. People will donate a can of food when they enter an event, because it has little or no perceived value to them, the money is already spent, so they are just donating an item of food, worth, say, $1.

Now try to get the same people to each donate $1 cash instead as they enter an event, you'll get near dismal results (like the 25 cents per Paint-in patron). Yet if they paid cash instead, the logistics of giving food to the food bank would be much easier, they could buy double the amount of food (because of their bulk discounts etc.) and the whole thing would raise more than double the amount of food with less effort. No, people think to foolishly.

#19 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Suspended User
  • 52,121 posts

Posted 19 July 2009 - 10:45 AM

Went to the paint in yesterday for the first time. Loved it :)

I observed a lot of frustration near the end when the police swooped in to chase everyone off the road and onto sidewalks, followed by irritated drivers forcing their way through the crowds. In turn, pedestrians were upset because for hours the street was their domain and all of a sudden it became an auto thoroughfare.

If anything, this event drives home the point that we need a pedestrian only street in this city. The atmosphere created by a car free zone really is something.


I think the event should be moved. Dare I say it could be done all throughout Beacon Hill Park? :o

I mean, it's done on Moss because of the Art Gallery, but it's not like it needs the gallery as a home-base. Only a small percentage of the daily visitors go to the Gallery dance after-party or whatever it is called.

#20 aastra

aastra
  • Member
  • 15,026 posts

Posted 19 July 2009 - 11:20 AM

I observed a lot of frustration near the end when the police swooped in to chase everyone off the road and onto sidewalks, followed by irritated drivers forcing their way through the crowds. In turn, pedestrians were upset because for hours the street was their domain and all of a sudden it became an auto thoroughfare.


Good gravy, we're talking about a quiet residential street! Irritated drivers?

We can temporarily close streets like Oak Bay Avenue, Government Street, West Broadway, Commercial Drive...but Moss Street presents some sort of special logistical challenge?

You're not quite at the end of this discussion topic!

Use the page links at the lower-left to go to the next page to read additional posts.
 



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users