Jump to content

      












Photo

The Climate Change / Global Warming Debate


  • Please log in to reply
1456 replies to this topic

#1441 LeoVictoria

LeoVictoria
  • Member
  • 1,724 posts

Posted 12 August 2017 - 12:28 PM

And yet the world's forests depend on greenhouse gas emissions, and thrive when concentrations are high.

Cutting down forests, like we are in huge quantities, appears to "rival emissions from the global transportation sector." And this is courtesy of the Council on Foreign Relations (https://www.cfr.org/...e-gas-emissions). So if I understand the situation correctly, we ought to be planting copious amounts of trees in an effort to diffuse the issue if man-made climate change factors.

The issue of "climate change" is so incredibly complex and the solutions to a variety of issues so varied that it's impossible to lay a finger on any one thing and blame it for singularly causing something else. It's junk science to do so, but it's very convenient for those who wish to make a profit over this issue.

 

Both solutions you describe rest on the same idea.   You can either cut output of GHG, or you can increase absorption through a net increase in forestation.   Both are required actions in order to solve the problem. 

 

It's fundamentally a very simple solution.   So throwing up your hands and declaring it is a complex problem so we might as well do nothing is a completely unproductive response.   Just because you don't understand something doesn't mean it is not understood by the people that actually study the issue.


Edited by LeoVictoria, 12 August 2017 - 12:30 PM.

  • nerka likes this

#1442 Mike K.

Mike K.
  • Administrator
  • 37,190 posts

Posted 12 August 2017 - 01:52 PM

We're not doing nothing, though. Compared to society of the 1970's predent-day America and Canada are pretty darned "green."

Know it all.
Citified.ca is Victoria's most comprehensive research resource for new-build homes and commercial spaces.


#1443 Bingo

Bingo
  • Member
  • 14,195 posts

Posted 13 August 2017 - 09:17 AM

Sceptical about climate change...go and talk to the Marmots.

 

Habitat of the endangered Vancouver Island marmot is disappearing as the warming climate allows trees to grow higher up mountainsides, turning alpine meadows into forest.

Adam Taylor, executive director of the Marmot Recovery Foundation, said the Vancouver Island marmot needs the treeless high-altitude meadows to see, avoid and escape predators.

Taylor said as little as 20 years ago, biologists would sit alongside one prominent marmot meadow in the Nanaimo Lakes area and count the animals.

Now that meadow is filled with small trees.

“And where there are trees, marmots simply don’t survive,” he said.

http://www.timescolo...line-1.21838803


"I know nothing except the fact of my ignorance" - Socrates


#1444 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Member
  • 46,678 posts

Posted 13 August 2017 - 09:21 AM

Oh please. I could not care less about the marmot. Some other less cute species is benefitting from the extra trees, like maybe even trees themselves? But they do not get the publicity.

#1445 Bingo

Bingo
  • Member
  • 14,195 posts

Posted 13 August 2017 - 09:39 AM

Oh please. I could not care less about the marmot. Some other less cute species is benefitting from the extra trees, like maybe even trees themselves? But they do not get the publicity.

 

Oh please.  You care about Harbour Cats...but so far this season they are not extinct.


"I know nothing except the fact of my ignorance" - Socrates


#1446 Bingo

Bingo
  • Member
  • 14,195 posts

Posted 13 August 2017 - 09:46 AM

Not only that this climate change heat wave is causing a struggle for other wildlife.

 

A summer heat wave and extensive wildfires in the B.C. Interior have been abnormally hard on animals in the province, especially nestlings. 

"The heat is overwhelming them, particularly the past couple weeks have been really bad. We've had a lot of young nestlings, jumping out of nests to avoid the heat," said Sam Smith, communications coordinator at Wildlife Rescue. 

Smith says when young birds leave the nest too early, they end up falling on the ground and start to waste away, because they don't yet have the strength to fly or move. 

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...fires-1.4244882

 


"I know nothing except the fact of my ignorance" - Socrates


#1447 Mike K.

Mike K.
  • Administrator
  • 37,190 posts

Posted 13 August 2017 - 10:04 AM

Just yesterday we were talking about how important it is for forests to regenerate and increase in size, as a means of combating man-made factors affecting climate change.


Know it all.
Citified.ca is Victoria's most comprehensive research resource for new-build homes and commercial spaces.


#1448 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Member
  • 46,678 posts

Posted 13 August 2017 - 10:27 AM

Ya.  If we need to save the marmot then let's log those newly treed meadows, or at least slash burn them.

 

We are very odd how we try to save certain species, at great expense.

 

 

It’s Time to Let Certain Animals Go Extinct Conservationists don’t have enough money to save all the endangered species. How do we decide which ones live and which ones die? A controversial ranking system to answer that question may be coming to the U.S. soon.

 

 

Gerber would never publicly prescribe extinction for any animal, but the Hawaiian monk seal is a prime example of how poorly we manage our endangered species spending, she says. Each year, the federal government spends about $5 million to protect the 1,400 seals left on earth. As significant as that sum sounds, it’s nowhere near enough to give them a real shot at survival. The seal’s habitat is spread across the 1,000-mile arc of the outer Hawaiian Islands; it is laborious and expensive to track them all, relocate juveniles to safe areas, and ensure dangerous garbage and debris stays out. To remove the seal from federally-funded life support would cost roughly $380 million and take over 50 years, researchers estimated in 2007

 

https://www.outsideo...-let-go-extinct


Edited by VicHockeyFan, 13 August 2017 - 10:32 AM.


#1449 Bingo

Bingo
  • Member
  • 14,195 posts

Posted 13 August 2017 - 10:43 AM

Oh please. I could not care less about the marmot.

 

Not even Marty?

 

Fur is flying on social media and police are investigating after the Victoria Royals’ popular mascot, Marty the Marmot, was body slammed onto the ice by a fan during second intermission at Saturday’s home game against the Red Deer Rebels.

http://globalnews.ca...at-hockey-game/


"I know nothing except the fact of my ignorance" - Socrates


#1450 LJ

LJ
  • Member
  • 7,373 posts

Posted 13 August 2017 - 07:39 PM

I was reading an article about CO2 emissions in the US. 27% comes from the transportation sector, cars, trucks, etc. and 29% comes from electricity production. They are going to have to dramatically change their production methods if we are all to change over to electric vehicles.


Life's a journey......so roll down the window and enjoy the breeze.

#1451 nerka

nerka
  • Member
  • 697 posts

Posted 14 August 2017 - 09:53 AM

I was reading an article about CO2 emissions in the US. 27% comes from the transportation sector, cars, trucks, etc. and 29% comes from electricity production. They are going to have to dramatically change their production methods if we are all to change over to electric vehicles.

Here's how Canada's and the US's emissions stack up by sector:

 

Canada: https://www.ec.gc.ca...en&n=F60DB708-1

US: https://www.epa.gov/...e-gas-emissions

 

The move away from coal in both countries has helped emissions fall or hold steady in recent years.



#1452 spanky123

spanky123
  • Member
  • 7,529 posts

Posted 14 August 2017 - 09:55 AM

I was reading an article about CO2 emissions in the US. 27% comes from the transportation sector, cars, trucks, etc. and 29% comes from electricity production. They are going to have to dramatically change their production methods if we are all to change over to electric vehicles.

 

Wouldn't that be ironic if the shift to electric vehicles actually INCREASES CO2 emissions. 



#1453 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Member
  • 46,678 posts

Posted 05 September 2017 - 09:43 AM

A whole ton of BC weather records fell yesterday.  Interestingly most of them were from like the 1950's.  If we have been increasing for years, you'd think we would have just eclipsed some like 1990's or 2000's records.


  • DavidSchell likes this

#1454 Bingo

Bingo
  • Member
  • 14,195 posts

Posted 05 September 2017 - 11:44 AM

The move away from coal in both countries has helped emissions fall or hold steady in recent years.

 

But that's the thing with climate change.

We seem to be having a lot more forest fires now and if that coal in the ground ever catches fire we will never get it put out because the rain only falls where they have hurricanes coming ashore.


"I know nothing except the fact of my ignorance" - Socrates


#1455 nerka

nerka
  • Member
  • 697 posts

Posted 05 September 2017 - 11:59 AM

A whole ton of BC weather records fell yesterday.  Interestingly most of them were from like the 1950's.  If we have been increasing for years, you'd think we would have just eclipsed some like 1990's or 2000's records.

Canada's (south of 60) temperature is estimated to have increased at 1.3 degrees per century over the last 65 years - https://ec.gc.ca/sc-...fset=1&toc=hide. So the increase to date is modest enough that many heat records still stand from decades ago. In particular in Canada many extreme records stand from the thirties.

 

However in recent decades more heat records have been broken than cold records. However the increase in record heat has been less than the decrease in record cold. This is consistent with global warming predictions that show more warming in winter than summer and relative more change in nighttime minimums than daytime maximums.

 

Here is a US example of changes over time in records (hot and cold) - https://www.epa.gov/...ow-temperatures

 

For a factual non-alarmist take on how global warming has affected the Pacific NW and will affect it in the future I highly recommend this - http://cliffmass.blo...ate-change.html. The focus is on Washington State, but the findings can be generalized to southernmost BC.

 

Bottom line. Thanks mainly to the moderating influence of the Pacific Ocean (slow to heat up) our region has experienced less climate change so far than many other areas of the globe.  Future climate change is coming but the speed of change will be tempered by the massive waterbody to our immediate west



#1456 LJ

LJ
  • Member
  • 7,373 posts

Posted 08 September 2017 - 08:08 PM

The making of a climate change skeptic...

 

https://wattsupwitht...university/amp/


Life's a journey......so roll down the window and enjoy the breeze.

#1457 Mike K.

Mike K.
  • Administrator
  • 37,190 posts

Posted 11 September 2017 - 05:08 PM

NDP finance minister Carole James has confirmed BC's carbon tax will no longer be revenue neutral.

 

From the CBC: "James says her government will use revenue generated from the changes to the carbon tax to help residents, families pay for green initiatives such as home retrofits or green transportation." - http://www.cbc.ca/ne...pdate-1.4284778


Know it all.
Citified.ca is Victoria's most comprehensive research resource for new-build homes and commercial spaces.


 



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users