Jump to content

      











Photo

Investment Ideas


  • Please log in to reply
453 replies to this topic

#1 Dimitrios

Dimitrios
  • Member
  • 316 posts

Posted 02 October 2014 - 10:03 PM

Is there another thread for this somewhere? It seems that all the real estate threads mumble around the topic of what else people do with their cash, but there is no dedicated thread to it.

 

I just thought it might be nice to have a thread where people can post their hot stock tips, interest rate finds, and such, or other ideas for parking cash or striking it rich (or not) or whatever.

 

For my part, I'm into what's annoyingly sometimes called 'socially conscious investing', meaning I generally have to think a company is making the world a slightly better place before I give them my cash. I tend to follow a lot of advice from http://www.altenergystocks.com and a couple of other sites. These days I'm pretty happy with high dividend buys that seem sustainable, like CSE, AQN, NFI, HASI (US). And index funds, though I haven't found one that I really like yet, in terms of good combo of low fees and such.

 

Anyway, I'm no expert. Anyone else want to share their picks?

 

Mods - if I'm reinventing the wheel here, feel free to move or delete this thread.


  • Mixed365 likes this

#2 Mixed365

Mixed365
  • Member
  • 921 posts

Posted 02 October 2014 - 10:17 PM

Is there another thread for this somewhere? It seems that all the real estate threads mumble around the topic of what else people do with their cash, but there is no dedicated thread to it.

 

I just thought it might be nice to have a thread where people can post their hot stock tips, interest rate finds, and such, or other ideas for parking cash or striking it rich (or not) or whatever.

 

For my part, I'm into what's annoyingly sometimes called 'socially conscious investing', meaning I generally have to think a company is making the world a slightly better place before I give them my cash. I tend to follow a lot of advice from http://www.altenergystocks.com and a couple of other sites. These days I'm pretty happy with high dividend buys that seem sustainable, like CSE, AQN, NFI, HASI (US). And index funds, though I haven't found one that I really like yet, in terms of good combo of low fees and such.

 

Anyway, I'm no expert. Anyone else want to share their picks?

 

Mods - if I'm reinventing the wheel here, feel free to move or delete this thread.

What are index funds?


“To understand cities, we have to deal outright with combinations or mixtures of uses, not separate uses, as the essential phenomena.”
- Jane Jacobs 


#3 Holden West

Holden West

    Va va voom!

  • Member
  • 9,058 posts

Posted 02 October 2014 - 10:37 PM

I want to start a Screw You Unethical Fund, with shares in Enbridge, Kinder Morgan, Seagram and Smith & Wesson.


  • rjag and Dimitrios like this
"Beaver, ahoy!""The bridge is like a magnet, attracting both pedestrians and over 30,000 vehicles daily who enjoy the views of Victoria's harbour. The skyline may change, but "Big Blue" as some call it, will always be there."
-City of Victoria website, 2009

#4 concorde

concorde
  • Banned
  • 1,980 posts

Posted 03 October 2014 - 05:52 AM

An example of an index fund is mutual funds.  they are basically a collection of stocks in a sector.  For example in energy it might contain 10-20 energy stocks

 

as for buying stocks my best opinion is stay of out the small cap stuff, but big fortune 500 companies, lock it in and forget about it.  unless you can afford to throw away your money stay out of anything with heavy risk

 

if you can try to find large Canadian companies with high dividends, but they are rare, but with the dividend tax credit its almost tax free money



#5 Dimitrios

Dimitrios
  • Member
  • 316 posts

Posted 03 October 2014 - 06:35 AM

The key with index funds is that they contain large collections of stocks that are designed to mimic the market as a whole (say, the TSX). So generally they go up and down with the market. The advantage they have over other classes of mutual funds is that their managment fees (MERs) are very low - 1% or less annually, typically, because their management is a bit more 'idiot-proof' than the ones that involve stock picking. My understanding is that studies have suggested that on average, managers of actively managed MFs (not index funds) do WORSE than pure random chance. There are talented fund managers out there, but they are the minority. So index funds don't waste your cash on high fees with sub-par managers, they just tag your profits with those of the market as a whole.

 

I'd better offer a disclaimer that I have no qualifications to be offerring financial advice!  There is lots on information out there on this stuff for those just learning. 



#6 Dimitrios

Dimitrios
  • Member
  • 316 posts

Posted 03 October 2014 - 06:42 AM

I want to start a Screw You Unethical Fund, with shares in Enbridge, Kinder Morgan, Seagram and Smith & Wesson.

Make sure you include Monsanto, BP, and Lockheed-Martin! Pretty tops on the lefty (s)hit list.



#7 Holden West

Holden West

    Va va voom!

  • Member
  • 9,058 posts

Posted 03 October 2014 - 07:07 AM

Make sure you include Monsanto, BP, and Lockheed-Martin! Pretty tops on the lefty (s)hit list.

 

Excellent choices!

 

By the way, all my financial investments were recommended to me by C-FAX radio financial experts. If anyone wants to discuss how successful they were for me, write to me at Holden West, the park across from the Our Place Shelter, Victoria, BC, Canada.


  • rjag and Mr_E_Squirrel like this
"Beaver, ahoy!""The bridge is like a magnet, attracting both pedestrians and over 30,000 vehicles daily who enjoy the views of Victoria's harbour. The skyline may change, but "Big Blue" as some call it, will always be there."
-City of Victoria website, 2009

#8 rjag

rjag
  • Member
  • 2,802 posts
  • LocationSi vis pacem para bellum

Posted 03 October 2014 - 07:26 AM

http://www.stockchas...opinions/recent

 

This provides daily updates of interviews from BNN and you can research all sorts of companies on this site and track the opinions to learn who got it right and who didn't.

 

That being said you can't go wrong with pipelines and energy stocks My guy is suggesting Baytex (7% yield) and Crescent Point (7% yield)

 

I bought Veresen when it was Fort Chicago about 5 years ago for a little over $9....its still a good buy at $17 paying a 5.7% dividend (Its my lucky stock, I'm getting about 11% yield on it so have made close to my original investment back).

 

Best thing you could do is max your TFSA and not with GIC's either but with something that pays a nice dividend. The old saying 'own the bank not what they sell you' Bank preferred or common stock pay way more than a GIC....TD, Scotia/RBC all paying just under 4% dividend....compared to 1% GIC

 

http://www.theglobea...globe-investor/

Always a great tool to research companies.



#9 rjag

rjag
  • Member
  • 2,802 posts
  • LocationSi vis pacem para bellum

Posted 03 October 2014 - 07:28 AM

Make sure you include Monsanto, BP, and Lockheed-Martin! Pretty tops on the lefty (s)hit list.

 

I bought BP a month after the spill in the Gulf....its a great buy paying about 5.5% currently



#10 Szeven

Szeven
  • Member
  • 775 posts

Posted 03 October 2014 - 07:42 AM

My 2 cents:

 

Interest rates have a million opinions out there. I'm of the opinion that the US curve will start to flatten like the Canadian one. I think that bodes well for high quality mid and longer term debt in the US. Keep in mind currently that while CAD has their BoC rate at 1%, the US is at 0%, yet the CAD 10yr is 2.16% and the US 10yr around 2.40%.  It might be a bit late to get into USD at this time given the move this year, but I still like US preferreds. I think the different tax treatment is worth it for your TFSA and RRSP, given my opinion that CAD banks are at risk of housing price movements. Considering my positions in residential real estate already, I dont want to compound that risk.

 

Stocks obviously also a tough one. Large caps in the US will face the headwind of these USD moves. Small caps have been very volatile. Because I don't have a worthwhile opinion I just say 'diversify'. Index funds have always been a favorite. In stocks I think keeping costs low is key.

 

Metals are a joke imo. It's the land of the cowboy. I think if you are really worried about inflation, buy some US TIPS, or buy one of the closed end funds that hold metals and trade at a discount. GTU.un is a great example. I still believe deflation is more of a threat that inflation in the US.


Edited by Szeven, 03 October 2014 - 07:43 AM.


#11 jonny

jonny
  • Member
  • 7,060 posts

Posted 03 October 2014 - 07:44 AM

I want to start a Screw You Unethical Fund, with shares in Enbridge, Kinder Morgan, Seagram and Smith & Wesson.

 

Don't forget about Philip Morris and Monsanto!



#12 jonny

jonny
  • Member
  • 7,060 posts

Posted 03 October 2014 - 07:49 AM

Open a TFSA if you don't have one yet and buy some index funds. ETFs are much cheaper than mutual funds and have been shown to outperform mutual funds over the past several years. 20% Canadian, 20% US, 20% international and 40% bonds (20% Canadian government, and 20% corporate).

 

Avoid small cap unless you are willing to lose 100% of your initial investment. I still own some shitty mining company stock that was de-listed years ago. I couldn't even get rid of it for a fraction of a penny per share if I wanted to.



#13 pherthyl

pherthyl
  • Member
  • 2,209 posts

Posted 03 October 2014 - 08:22 AM

Open a TFSA if you don't have one yet and buy some index funds. ETFs are much cheaper than mutual funds and have been shown to outperform mutual funds over the past several years. 20% Canadian, 20% US, 20% international and 40% bonds (20% Canadian government, and 20% corporate).

 

Avoid small cap unless you are willing to lose 100% of your initial investment. I still own some shitty mining company stock that was de-listed years ago. I couldn't even get rid of it for a fraction of a penny per share if I wanted to.

 

Basically this.  Unless you have a couple spare hours a day to do your own research and investing is your hobby, go to http://canadiancouch...del-portfolios/  and pick one you want.  Re-balance annually.  Statistics show that the vast majority picking stocks will do worse than just matching the market.  

 

More important:  put as much in as possible.   http://www.mrmoneymu...rly-retirement/


  • SamCB likes this

#14 jonny

jonny
  • Member
  • 7,060 posts

Posted 03 October 2014 - 08:34 AM

Basically this.  Unless you have a couple spare hours a day to do your own research and investing is your hobby, go to http://canadiancouch...del-portfolios/  and pick one you want.  Re-balance annually.  Statistics show that the vast majority picking stocks will do worse than just matching the market.  

 

More important:  put as much in as possible.   http://www.mrmoneymu...rly-retirement/

 

One of my favourite index investing blogs is Canadian Cough Potato!



#15 dasmo

dasmo
  • Member
  • 3,942 posts

Posted 03 October 2014 - 09:29 AM

I've done well investing in my own picks of individual stocks. In fact, since I fired my "financial advisor" and sold off the mutual funds and moved the account to my self directed itrade account, the balance has almost doubled after doing nothing for a decade prior... To me it's about doing it slow, going long, and investing in what you know. If you want to make money you have the leave the ethical side out. Can't play poker with ethics either...
  • rjag likes this

#16 LJ

LJ
  • Member
  • 7,492 posts

Posted 03 October 2014 - 07:38 PM

 

 

Avoid small cap unless you are willing to lose 100% of your initial investment. I still own some shitty mining company stock that was de-listed years ago. I couldn't even get rid of it for a fraction of a penny per share if I wanted to.

Yeah I have a couple of those capital losses as well. OTOH  a friend of mine bought a 10% share of some company that went into bankruptcy protection years ago and the stock became virtually worthless. Then last year another company bought that company and changed the whole product  and now it is worth a pretty penny.


Life's a journey......so roll down the window and enjoy the breeze.

#17 Baro

Baro
  • Member
  • 4,151 posts

Posted 04 October 2014 - 11:42 AM

Forget about throwing money away on a managed mutual fund.  Sign up for a TD mutual fund account but don't buy any of their managed funds.  Then sign up for their e-series funds, buy a good mix of them as recommended on http://canadiancouchpotato.com/ then forget you even have them.  Re-balance them every year or so, but for the most part don't touch them.  You'll come out way ahead of any managed fund, specially since you aren't pissing away the highest broker rates in the world to your useless broker.


"beats greezy have baked donut-dough"

#18 Dimitrios

Dimitrios
  • Member
  • 316 posts

Posted 21 October 2014 - 06:44 PM

So, the markets took a pretty serious dive last week - and then rebounded pretty solidly this week so far. Anyone panic and sell low (and want to admit it)? Anyone make a bucket shorting? Anyone take a buying opportunity?

 

I wish I had bought (of course), and thought about it but didn't have free cash. Lots of bargains were around; many still are.



#19 dasmo

dasmo
  • Member
  • 3,942 posts

Posted 21 October 2014 - 07:07 PM

I took profits from Facebook, GoPro, Coke, and Toyota a few weeks back. Bought Netflix, Tesla, Whole Foods and SeaDrill in the slump...

#20 jonny

jonny
  • Member
  • 7,060 posts

Posted 22 October 2014 - 07:14 AM

I bought last week, but of course didn't buy enough. *sighs*



You're not quite at the end of this discussion topic!

Use the page links at the lower-left to go to the next page to read additional posts.
 



1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


    Google (1)