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Halifax newspaper strike


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#1 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 23 January 2016 - 09:55 AM

Circulation has been in decline. In 2012 the Audit Bureau of Circulations reported circulation of 108,389 weekdays, 112,306 Saturdays and 97,190 Sundays The Sunday paper was combined with the Saturday paper and renamed Weekend after these numbers were released. In September 2014, weekday circulation was estimated at 70,000, with the weekend edition selling 72,000. On-line subscriptions totaled 1,862

 

 

https://en.wikipedia...hronicle_Herald

 

This will be interesting.  

 

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...dline-1.3416743

 

The Halifax Chronicle Herald's newsroom union members have walked off the job in Halifax, starting a strike at Canada's oldest independently owned newspaper.

 

The union and management were in position for a strike or lockout as of midnight Friday.

 

At least 20 newsroom staff were gathered outside the Herald building on Joseph Howe Drive ahead of the midnight deadline, said Francis Campbell, vice-president of the Halifax Typographical Union. 

 

"We're all in this together," Campbell said.

 

"We're looking for a fair deal and we're not going anywhere until we get one."

 

The union includes 61 reporters, editors, photographers, columnists and support staff.

 



#2 Bingo

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Posted 23 January 2016 - 10:46 AM

That's another newspaper that will close, probably sooner than later.


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#3 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 23 January 2016 - 11:25 AM

The union contends in the final hours before the deadline, the paper contracted out its online work to a company in Ontario, while other work normally done in Nova Scotia will be done in New Brunswick under Brunswick News.

 

“Herald CEO Mark Lever has been preaching to readers about how important it is to create jobs here in Nova Scotia, but he can’t be bothered to negotiate with longtime, loyal employees, and instead sends their work to Ontario,” Wilson wrote.

Wilson said the union would be only be official in name only if the hundreds of changes to the existing contract were accepted.

 

The country’s largest independently owned newspaper has said it wants to reduce wages, lay off up to 18 workers, lengthen work hours and alter future pension benefits to cope with challenges in the newspaper industry across the continent.

 

 

http://www.news957.c...ain-publishing/

 

Brunswick News is owned by Irving, that seems to own just about everything in Atlantic Canada.

 

https://en.wikipedia...up_of_Companies



#4 johnk

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Posted 23 January 2016 - 06:20 PM

In Halifax we knew it as The Chronically-Horrid. Owned by the Dennis family, one of whom was my boss for 2 years at another place.
The strikers may be flirting with disaster. Years ago The Montreal Star had a strike that dragged on. Strikers felt they had the upper hand in the beginning. The strike ended after about 8 months when ownership simply closed the paper. It was a shame because it was a good paper.

Edited by johnk, 23 January 2016 - 06:22 PM.


#5 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 23 January 2016 - 06:34 PM

In Halifax we knew it as The Chronically-Horrid. Owned by the Dennis family, one of whom was my boss for 2 years at another place.
The strikers may be flirting with disaster. Years ago The Montreal Star had a strike that dragged on. Strikers felt they had the upper hand in the beginning. The strike ended after about 8 months when ownership simply closed the paper. It was a shame because it was a good paper.

 

Yes, I quoted the circulation numbers earlier in this thread.  It probably does 30,000 more copies than the TC every day, but it's in a crazy decline.

 

I can see it closing forever.  But funny enough, they can use replacement workers in NS and there seem to be a crop graduating J-school every year looking for work (for some reason).  And they have said these contractors can work from home and write stories with no bylines.  I think you still have to collect news, and talk to witnesses/politicians/others, so it might be hard to hide you are writing for them.

 

I dunno.  It'll be interesting anyway.  I presume copies are hitting doorsteps and newstands this weekend (I think it publishes 7 days/week).  I'm also not sure how the rest of the place are reacting to the newsroom strike.  Maybe none of the rest (circulation, accounting, layout, ad sales etc.) is unionized?

 

If they have to print it in New Brunswick, that seems like a heck of a circulation nightmare.  I think at the TC's height (95,000 copies on Fridays), they probably employed about 25 contracted truckers to drop to carriers' central drop points or homes every night.  Timing is everything with newspapers, you fire up the presses as late as possible each night, still with a view though to getting all copies out to carriers on time.  A bit of a balance.



#6 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 05 August 2017 - 02:22 PM

A tentative deal has been reached between the Halifax Chronicle Herald and its striking employees.

A joint media statement from the paper's owner Saltwire Network and the Halifax Typographical Union said they had reached an agreement to end the 18-month strike after two days of mediation.

"The terms of the deal have not been disclosed and a media blackout will continue until the agreement is ratified," the statement read.

A media blackout is standard in every collective agreement reached, explained Communications Workers of America Canada's president Martin Hanlon in an interview with CBC News Saturday.

 

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...oyees-1.4236819



 



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