Jump to content

      













Photo

November 11


  • Please log in to reply
58 replies to this topic

#41 Benezet

Benezet
  • Member
  • 1,044 posts

Posted 16 November 2014 - 09:22 AM

Isn't Harper also considered the Commander in Chief anyways?


No, it's actually the Queen, as represented by the Governor-General. The PM is not a member of the military.

I don't think anyone invited Harper to dress in any sort of Forces uniform, and he certainly has no more business wearing pilot's wings than he would calling himself a PEng or a dentist.

Laws are supposed to apply to everyone equally.
  • Nparker, sebberry, Jill and 1 other like this

#42 Rob Randall

Rob Randall
  • Member
  • 10,200 posts

Posted 16 November 2014 - 09:27 AM

Isn't Harper also considered the Commander in Chief anyways?

 That's more of a US presidential thing. Our Governor General is the commander in chief and she or he is allowed to wear a military uniform.


"[Randall's] aesthetic poll was more accurate than his political acumen"

-Tom Hawthorne, Toronto Globe and Mail


#43 AllseeingEye

AllseeingEye

    AllSeeingEye

  • Member
  • 3,994 posts
  • LocationGorge-Selkirk

Posted 16 November 2014 - 03:16 PM

Isn't Harper also considered the Commander in Chief anyways?

I would have to double check my Canadian Constitutional regs but in this country, unlike the US where the POTUS is technically the Commander-in-Chief, I do believe the Governor General holds that distinction which is why David Johnson was in a Canadian Army uniform on Remembrance Day in spite of the fact he has never served in the CAF in any capacity.



#44 lanforod

lanforod
  • Member
  • 7,196 posts
  • LocationSaanich

Posted 16 November 2014 - 03:18 PM

Thanks for clearing that up. Technically he can still order the military to do whatever.

#45 Bernard

Bernard
  • Member
  • 4,241 posts
  • LocationVictoria BC

Posted 18 November 2014 - 10:20 AM

Canada does not have the commander in chief type of role there is in the US.   The role the US president fulfills as commander in chief is actually done by the chief of defense staff in Canada.   The Prime Minister and Cabinet give the missions to the military but it is the Chief of Defense Staff that is responsible for all the operational decisions.

 

The Governor General is a symbolic embodiment of the Crown and the Crown is everything in our legal and political system but it holds no real powers.    The military is the enforcement arm of the Crown but does not take direction from the Crown



#46 AllseeingEye

AllseeingEye

    AllSeeingEye

  • Member
  • 3,994 posts
  • LocationGorge-Selkirk

Posted 18 November 2014 - 11:22 AM

Canada does not have the commander in chief type of role there is in the US.   The role the US president fulfills as commander in chief is actually done by the chief of defense staff in Canada.   The Prime Minister and Cabinet give the missions to the military but it is the Chief of Defense Staff that is responsible for all the operational decisions.

 

The Governor General is a symbolic embodiment of the Crown and the Crown is everything in our legal and political system but it holds no real powers.    The military is the enforcement arm of the Crown but does not take direction from the Crown

I am very well aware of the role of the CDS (And its 'Defence'  BTW..."Defense" is the US spelling) and the symbolic role of the GG pertaining to the CAF, and that in real terms he/she certainly does not have the same literal or legislative power as the POTUS.

 

My comments were intended to be seen more from a constitutional standpoint; to witness from the GG website:

http://www.gg.ca/eve...px?sc=4&lan=eng



#47 AllseeingEye

AllseeingEye

    AllSeeingEye

  • Member
  • 3,994 posts
  • LocationGorge-Selkirk

Posted 18 November 2014 - 12:32 PM

Apologies for the length of the following however this was sent to me by a colleague in the UK with no link; a brilliant and poignant overview of Canada and this nation's contribution to Western/European security over the past century from a British newspaper- so true too:

 

 

Until the deaths of Canadian soldiers killed in Afghanistan , probably almost no one outside their home country had been aware that Canadian troops are deployed in the region.

 

And as always, Canada will bury its dead, just as the rest of the world, as always will forget its sacrifice, just as it always forgets nearly everything Canada ever does. It seems that Canada 's historic mission is to come to the selfless aid both of its friends and of complete strangers, and then, once the crisis is over, to be well and truly ignored.

 

Canada is the perpetual wallflower that stands on the edge of the hall, waiting for someone to come and ask her for a dance. A fire breaks out, she risks life and limb to rescue her fellow dance-goers, and suffers serious injuries. But when the hall is repaired and the dancing resumes, there is Canada, the wallflower still, while those she once helped glamorously cavort across the floor, blithely neglecting her yet again.

 

That is the price Canada pays for sharing the North American continent with the United States , and for being a selfless friend of Britain in two global conflicts. For much of the 20th century, Canada was torn in two different directions: It seemed to be a part of the old world, yet had an address in the new one, and that divided identity ensured that it never fully got the gratitude it deserved.

 

Yet it's purely voluntary contribution to the cause of freedom in two world wars was perhaps the greatest of any democracy. Almost 10% of Canada 's entire population of seven million people served in the armed forces during the First World War, and nearly 60,000 died. The great
Allied victories of 1918 were spearheaded by Canadian troops, perhaps the most capable soldiers in the entire British order of battle.
Canada was repaid for its enormous sacrifice by downright neglect, it's unique contribution to victory being absorbed into the popular memory as somehow or other the work of the 'British.'

 

The Second World War provided a re-run. The Canadian navy began the war with a half dozen vessels, and ended up policing nearly half of the Atlantic against U-boat attack. More than 120 Canadian warships participated in the Normandy landings, during which 15,000 Canadian
soldiers went ashore on D-Day alone.
Canada finished the war with the third-largest navy and the fourth largest air force in the world. The world thanked Canada with the same sublime indifference as it had the previous time. Canadian participation in the war was acknowledged in film only if it was
necessary to give an American actor a part in a campaign in which the United States had clearly not
participated - a touching scrupulousness which, of course, Hollywood has since abandoned, as it has any notion of a separate Canadian identity.

 

So it is a general rule that actors and filmmakers arriving in Hollywood keep their nationality - unless, that is, they are Canadian. Thus Mary Pickford, Walter Huston, Donald Sutherland,
Michael J. Fox, William Shatner, Norman Jewison, David Cronenberg, Alex Trebek, Art Linkletter, Mike Weir and Dan Aykroyd have in the popular perception become American, and Christopher Plummer, British.

 

It is as if, in the very act of becoming famous, a Canadian ceases to be Canadian, unless she is Margaret Atwood, who is as unshakeably Canadian as a moose, or Celine Dion, for whom Canada
has proved quite unable to find any takers.
Moreover, Canada is every bit as querulously alert to the achievements of its sons and daughters as the rest of the world is completely unaware of them. T

he Canadians proudly say of themselves - and are unheard by anyone else - that 1% of the world's population has provided 10% of the world's peacekeeping forces.

 

Canadian soldiers in the past half century have been the greatest peacekeepers on Earth - in 39 missions on UN mandates, and six on non-UN peacekeeping duties, from Vietnam to East Timor, from Sinai to Bosnia.Yet the only foreign engagement that has entered the popular non-Canadian imagination was the sorry affair in Somalia , in which out-of-control paratroopers murdered two Somali infiltrators. Their regiment was then disbanded in disgrace - a uniquely Canadian act
of self-abasement for which, naturally, the Canadians received no international credit.

 

So who today in the United States knows about the stoic and selfless friendship its northern neighbor has given it in Afghanistan ?Rather like Cyrano de Bergerac , Canada repeatedly does honourable things for honourable motives, but instead of being thanked for it, it remains something of a figure of fun. It is the Canadian way, for which Canadians should be proud, yet such honour comes at a high cost. This past year (2013) more grieving Canadian families knew that cost all too tragically well.

Lest we forget.


  • Bingo and lanforod like this

#48 Mike K.

Mike K.
  • Administrator
  • 50,423 posts

Posted 18 November 2014 - 02:16 PM

Have a read about Polish military forces in the Second World War and you'll really get a sense of what its like to be forgotten.

 

The sacrifices Poles made in the war, only to be shunned at its end by the countries they shed so much blood for, is a tragedy gone largely untold. And further to that the Poles were literally the gatekeepers of Europe, thwarting attacks from the east for time immemorial while the rest of the continent fought amongst themselves.


  • johnk likes this

Know it all.
Citified.ca is Victoria's most comprehensive research resource for new-build homes and commercial spaces.


#49 AllseeingEye

AllseeingEye

    AllSeeingEye

  • Member
  • 3,994 posts
  • LocationGorge-Selkirk

Posted 18 November 2014 - 02:37 PM

Have a read about Polish military forces in the Second World War and you'll really get a sense of what its like to be forgotten.

 

The sacrifices Poles made in the war, only to be shunned at its end by the countries they shed so much blood for, is a tragedy gone largely untold. And further to that the Poles were literally the gatekeepers of Europe, thwarting attacks from the east for time immemorial while the rest of the continent fought amongst themselves.

Couldn't agree more Mike however this being a Canadian forum  :)  I figured I would focus on Canada in the November 11 thread.

 

If you want to look at Poland - perfectly legitimate subject - then you need go beyond that consider the USSR. Forgotten - especially in popular culture, Hollywood movies and books? Consider that 75% of Nazi Germany's 10,000,000 losses during WWII came at the hands of the Red Army on the Eastern Front. Consider what might have happened on D-day if 3 million Wehrmacht troops weren't tied up in Russia. Might have been a very different outcome.



#50 Mr Cook Street

Mr Cook Street
  • Member
  • 927 posts

Posted 18 November 2014 - 02:43 PM

If you want to look at Poland - perfectly legitimate subject - then you need go beyond that consider the USSR. Forgotten - especially in popular culture, Hollywood movies and books? Consider that 75% of Nazi Germany's 10,000,000 losses during WWII came at the hands of the Red Army on the Eastern Front. Consider what might have happened on D-day if 3 million Wehrmacht troops weren't tied up in Russia. Might have been a very different outcome.

Though the USSR killed millions of Eastern Europeans - mostly Ukrainians - by forced starvation and horrendous persecution years before the first shot was fired of WWII.



#51 Mike K.

Mike K.
  • Administrator
  • 50,423 posts

Posted 18 November 2014 - 02:54 PM

Couldn't agree more Mike however this being a Canadian forum  :)  I figured I would focus on Canada in the November 11 thread.
 
If you want to look at Poland - perfectly legitimate subject - then you need go beyond that consider the USSR. Forgotten - especially in popular culture, Hollywood movies and books? Consider that 75% of Nazi Germany's 10,000,000 losses during WWII came at the hands of the Red Army on the Eastern Front. Consider what might have happened on D-day if 3 million Wehrmacht troops weren't tied up in Russia. Might have been a very different outcome.

 
I suppose what I was trying to say was that the British have a history of shunning their allies. Canadians have suffered in that regard as other nations have and that shouldn't come as a surprise -- although the article is trying to make it seem as though only we (Canadians) are the forgotten wallflowers.
 
Anyhow, yes, the USSR lost millions, but they were fully complicit in starting the Second World War. While Hitler moved on Poland from the west Stalin moved on Poland from the east, an aggressor no different from Hitler. In fact he killed far more people in Gulags -- by some estimates 3x as many -- than Hitler killed in his concentration camps. Luckily for the USSR the Allies were too scared not to hail them as saviours when the final showdown came about. And for that Poland paid the ultimate price.
 
Anyhow, back to Canada.
 

Though the USSR killed millions of Eastern Europeans - mostly Ukrainians - by forced starvation and horrendous persecution years before the first shot was fired of WWII.

I'd be interested in learning more about this is you could provide a link.

I know the Ukrainians were aggressors against Poland prior to the war but I had not heard that the USSR actually killed millions of Ukrainians.


Know it all.
Citified.ca is Victoria's most comprehensive research resource for new-build homes and commercial spaces.


#52 AllseeingEye

AllseeingEye

    AllSeeingEye

  • Member
  • 3,994 posts
  • LocationGorge-Selkirk

Posted 18 November 2014 - 02:57 PM

Though the USSR killed millions of Eastern Europeans - mostly Ukrainians - by forced starvation and horrendous persecution years before the first shot was fired of WWII.

Got it, check. Just for transparency and full disclosure sake I have a double History Degree with a major in military studies. None of this is news to me - and far be it from me to defend the old USSR; I am so anti-communist as to make the majority of posters on VV look like raving Marxists.

 

Fact is however from a purely military standpoint the USSR and the Red Army specifically bled Germany dry. Period.

 

They annihilated 500+ German Divisions, nearly 50,000 Luftwaffe aircraft and at least two entire German Army Corps. And yes as pointed out by MCS they were hardly saints. Ukrainian atrocities aside, one reason why Germany got as far as they did on the Eastern Front was a little cookout devised by Stalin just prior to the war where he had 30,000+ senior Soviet Army officers purged - which is a nice way of saying they were executed.


  • Mr Cook Street likes this

#53 Mike K.

Mike K.
  • Administrator
  • 50,423 posts

Posted 18 November 2014 - 03:03 PM

ASE, what are your thoughts on the theory that Hitler went after Stalin after realizing that the USSR had in fact used Germany to start the war, tire out the west, and deplete its own military resources which would then allow the USSR to move in and sweep across the continent largely uncontested?


Know it all.
Citified.ca is Victoria's most comprehensive research resource for new-build homes and commercial spaces.


#54 AllseeingEye

AllseeingEye

    AllSeeingEye

  • Member
  • 3,994 posts
  • LocationGorge-Selkirk

Posted 18 November 2014 - 03:24 PM

ASE, what are your thoughts on the theory that Hitler went after Stalin after realizing that the USSR had in fact used Germany to start the war, tire out the west, and deplete its own military resources which would then allow the USSR to move in and sweep across the continent largely uncontested?

Now_that requires a much longer response than I have time for now Mike, heh. In short - "no". I will provide my reasoning later when I'm not actually, um..."working".


  • Mike K. likes this

#55 LJ

LJ
  • Member
  • 9,117 posts

Posted 18 November 2014 - 07:56 PM

Can't find the thread about the police ticketing the car following the repatriation of the soldier killed in a training accident but just wanted to note that it made Fox national news today. How embarrassing.


Life's a journey......so roll down the window and enjoy the breeze.

#56 Bingo

Bingo
  • Member
  • 16,666 posts

Posted 08 November 2015 - 04:05 PM

Remembrance Day ceremonies - 2015

Greater Victoria

Most regular services start at 10:45 a.m. Wednesday unless noted otherwise (spectators are requested to be in place by 10:30).

• Aboriginal ceremony, 9 a.m. at Goldstream park

• Veterans’ Cemetery, 9:30 a.m., 1190 Colville Rd.

• Central Saanich, Peacekeeping Memorial Cenotaph, municipal hall, 1903 Mt. Newton Cross Rd.

• Esquimalt Cenotaph, Memorial Park, 1229 Esquimalt Rd.

• Oak Bay Cenotaph, at the War Memorial, Uplands  Park, Beach Drive

• Royal Roads University, 10:40 a.m. in the Italian Garden of the school, 2600 Sooke Rd. Free admission to Hatley Park and the museum for the day.

• Saanich Cenotaph, municipal hall, 770 Vernon Ave.

• Sidney Cenotaph, in front of RCMP station, 9895 4th St.

• Sooke Cenotaph, Sooke Royal Canadian Legion, 6726 Eustace Rd.

• Victoria Cenotaph, legislature grounds, 501 Belleville St.

• West Shore Cenotaph, Veterans Memorial Park, intersection of Goldstream Avenue and Veterans Memorial Parkway, Langford

- See more at: http://www.timescolo...h.kGaiOWbY.dpuf

 



#57 Bingo

Bingo
  • Member
  • 16,666 posts

Posted 11 November 2017 - 11:29 AM

November 11, 2017

 

IMG_7998.JPG

 

IMG_7999.JPG

 

IMG_7988.JPG

 

 

 

 


  • Mike K. and AllseeingEye like this

#58 Mike K.

Mike K.
  • Administrator
  • 50,423 posts

Posted 11 November 2017 - 12:31 PM

Thank you, Bingo.

Know it all.
Citified.ca is Victoria's most comprehensive research resource for new-build homes and commercial spaces.


#59 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Suspended User
  • 52,121 posts

Posted 11 November 2017 - 01:05 PM

Terror threat blockade.  Hey there's our old tactical response vehicle!

 

23472112_1713635235322808_46091270789802


Edited by VicHockeyFan, 11 November 2017 - 01:05 PM.

<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

 



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users