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Taliban issues ultimatum to Canada


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#1 martini

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Posted 17 August 2008 - 01:00 PM

Taliban issues ultimatum to Canada
Get troops out or Canadians will be targeted

Scott Deveau and Linda Nguyen
Canwest News Service

Sunday, August 17, 2008

A Canadian soldier with the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) stands guard during a patrol.
CREDIT: Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
A Canadian soldier with the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) stands guard during a patrol.
Afghan hospital workers stand near the coffins of three International aid workers killed in an attack claimed by the insurgent Taliban in Logar province some 50 km south of Kabul on August 13, 2008.
CREDIT: Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
Afghan hospital workers stand near the coffins of three International aid workers killed in an attack claimed by the insurgent Taliban in Logar province some 50 km south of Kabul on August 13, 2008.

KANDAHAR, Afghanistan -- The Taliban issued a dire warning to Canada Sunday that if it does not withdraw its troops from Afghanistan, insurgents would continue to target all Canadians in the country, like they did earlier this week in an ambush attack on female aid workers outside Kabul.

The Taliban urged Canadians in an open letter to press the government to withdraw their troops from Afghanistan or risk further attacks.

"The Afghans did not go to Canada to kill the Canadians. Rather, it is the Canadians who came to Afghanistan to kill and torture the Afghan," the letter states, adding that they felt Canada was pandering to the United States in doing so.

"Therefore, you have to convince your government to put an end to the occupation of Afghanistan, so that the Afghans are not killed with your hands and so that you are not killed with the hands of the Afghans."

In a statement, Defence Minister Peter MacKay condemned the letter, saying that it will not waver the goals of Canadian soldiers currently in Afghanistan.

"This letter is a disgusting attempt to justify the deliberate killings of innocent civilians. There is no justification for these killings by the Taliban," he said Sunday. "Canada is in Afghanistan at the request of the democratically elected government of that country."

He added that Canada will continue to try to bring stability and security to the Afghan people.

"We will continue to fight for these goals," MacKay said. "We will continue to protect the Afghan people from these ruthless killers."

A spokesman for Prime Minister Stephen Harper said Canada does not respond to threats from the Taliban.

"This has no effect whatsoever on the Canadian mission," spokesman Kory Teneycke told Canwest News Service. "The Taliban demonstrates time and again, its willingness to target civilians, including Afghan civilians as part of their efforts."

Earlier this week, four aid workers from the International Rescue Committee, including two Canadians, were killed in a brazen daylight ambush on a stretch of road just south of Kabul.

The Taliban have taken credit for the shooting deaths of Jackie Kirk, 40, of Montreal; Shirley Case, 30, of Williams Lake, B.C.; and Nicole Dial, a dual citizen of the U.S. and Trinidad. Their Afghan driver was also killed.

The four were in the country working on educational programs for Afghan children.

Their deaths add to the 19 non-governmental agency workers that have been killed in the country so far this year - more than were killed in all of 2007.

The IRC held a news conference in Kabul Saturday to reiterate that they were committed to continuing their work in the country, but needed to assess why their aid workers were being targeted after two others were killed last summer in a similar attack.

The IRC has been offering educational and other emergency aid in Afghanistan since 1979, just weeks after the Soviet-led invasion of the country.

The situation in Afghanistan has become increasingly treacherous for foreign aid workers in the country, who were once deemed neutral in the conflict.

In an interview earlier this week, Mohammad Hashim Mayar, deputy director of Agency Co-ordinating Body for Afghan Relief, said he believed the security situation outside of Kabul is worsening and that is leading to more attacks since a lot of the development work is being done outside of the country.

ACBAR represents more than half of the 200 NGOs doing development work in the country.

The Taliban say they are now targeting Western aid workers because they are promoting the agenda of the West. However, their critics, including Mayar, say their efforts are aimed at destabilizing any development in the country in order to make the NATO-backed Karzai government appear weak.

Liberal Leader Stephane Dion said during a visit to Montreal Sunday the Taliban warning does not surprise him.

"This letter is nothing new. We know the Taliban will use any means for their terrorist goal," he said. "So it's very important for NATO and the government of Canada to do everything to protect our civilians, not only brave men and women in uniform but the brave Canadians who are doing their best as activists to help the Afghan people."

The defence critic for the New Democratic Party urged Harper to take Sunday's threat seriously.

"It's another dramatic example of the security situation in Afghanistan," said Dawn Black, also an MP for New Westminster-Coquitlam. "The NDP has been opposed to the counter-insurgency mission for a long time and this is another indication that Harper should acknowledge the deteriorating security measures and change course on our mission in Afghanistan."

Black said the threat does not justify the recent killings but it shows that the Taliban will continue to use deaths as part of a "propaganda campaign."

"We're dealing with extremists who appear not to have any guidelines about killing," she said. "It's getting worse, not better and we're losing lives."

Meanwhile, World Vision, a non-profit international agency with workers in Afghanistan renewed their vows Sunday to continue their work in the war-torn country.

"All our staff go through rigorous security training and we're going to be increasing and strengthening security measures so we can continue to meet the dire needs of children and families in Afghanistan," spokeswoman Karen Homer said Sunday. "We have no plans to suspend or plan to stop our work in Afghanistan."

World Vision has been in Afghanistan for more than 10 years and focuses on work in community development programs that emphasize a wide range of areas including education, agriculture and health care.

In their letter to Canadians, the Taliban say future killings will be done for "revenge."

"Afghanistan has to try to have good relations with you," the Taliban said. "But if your government continues a reversed policy, the Afghans will be obliged to kill your nationals, in revenge for their brothers, their sisters, and their children."

Zabiullah Mujahid, who identifies himself as spokesman for the Taliban, said in a telephone interview that journalists may also be targeted.

"If we arrest their journalists or aid workers we will target them as we did in Logar province. They are not differentiating women and children with military targets, and we will not differentiate theirs, too."
Neither the Canadian Forces nor the Canadian Embassy in Afghanistan would comment on the letter.

National Post and Canwest News Service
© Canwest News Service 2008
http://www.canada.co...07-8a5fe0d3e289

#2 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 17 August 2008 - 01:39 PM

I'd tell the Taliban this:

"Go **** yourselves, we are here to kill you."

#3 martini

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Posted 17 August 2008 - 01:45 PM

^:D

#4 victorian fan

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Posted 17 August 2008 - 02:51 PM

"Afghanistan has to try to have good relations with you," the Taliban said. "But if your government continues a reversed policy, the Afghans will be obliged to kill your nationals, in revenge for their brothers, their sisters, and their children."


Ah ha. ATaliban example of a strongly worded letter.

#5 martini

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Posted 17 August 2008 - 04:19 PM

I seem to have the theme song for Team America in my head.

#6 VicDuck

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Posted 19 July 2009 - 06:03 AM

Hell, i say listen to them and get the f*** out. This war is making us less safe.

#7 Bernard

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 04:00 PM

Interesting poll out of Afghanistan

Seems the people in the country want Western troops to be there and hate the Taliban

#8 spanky123

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 04:45 PM

Interesting poll out of Afghanistan

Seems the people in the country want Western troops to be there and hate the Taliban


Some of the D3 Systems stuff is hilarious. Take for example their recent survey that stated that 80% of Afgans (96% in Kabul) thought that security was good in their area. http://www.d3systems...public/news.asp

Heck if they feel so secure then why are we there? Those figures are better than what you would get in downtown Victoria!

#9 Rob Randall

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Posted 23 July 2010 - 07:59 AM

At a ceremony at yesterday's Council meeting at City Hall, Armed Forces members returned a City of Victoria flag that was flown in Afghanistan. A soldier asked the City for one of the white flags bearing Victoria's blue banner logo a few months ago. The officer jokingly apologized for the dust and presented the flag back to Mayor Fortin who unfurled it. Holding it up, everyone could see how the once-pristine flag was now completely stained reddish-brown by the dusty Afghan winds. The Mayor immediately called for public works staff to fly the flag at City Hall. An unusually emotional moment at City Hall.

It's easy to become complacent about the Afghan mission, after all, it's just another endlessly repeating headline. The ceremony made it all the more tangible.

"[Randall's] aesthetic poll was more accurate than his political acumen"

-Tom Hawthorne, Toronto Globe and Mail


#10 Sparky

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Posted 23 July 2010 - 12:31 PM

^ Thanks for that information Rob. Now we will know why this flag is flying at city hall.

To sum this mission up in a word.

"Nasty"

#11 North Shore

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Posted 24 July 2010 - 08:44 AM

I'd tell the Taliban this:

"Go **** yourselves, we are here to kill you."


I don't disagree with your sentiment, but how, exactly, to go about this? How do you win against a guerilla enemy when you are an invader/occupier? Indeed, when has an occupier ever won against such opposition? "We had to destroy the village to save it" comes to mind...
Say, what's that mountain goat doing up here in the mist?

#12 Bernard

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Posted 24 July 2010 - 08:59 AM

I don't disagree with your sentiment, but how, exactly, to go about this? How do you win against a guerilla enemy when you are an invader/occupier? Indeed, when has an occupier ever won against such opposition? "We had to destroy the village to save it" comes to mind...


There are actually a number of examples of success. Most of the success is from oppressive regimes with no regard to human rights at all, but there are other examples.

1920 in Ireland, the Irish government won out over the IRA


The UK had success in Malaya, Cyrus, Oman and Aden from 1948 to the early 1970s. They had problems in Kenya. In Northern Ireland it was a very mixed result, the IRA did not win, but the troubles were not a high point.

India has been successful in dealing with insurgencies.

Russia was successful in Chechnya, though it was rather a scorched earth policy

Peru defeated the Shining Path

Admittedly these have few examples of the use of foreign troops to co the counter insurgency.

The NATO intervention in Afghanistan is fundamentally different that all previous use of foreign troops in the country. The troops are actively protecting the people and bringing some sense of order and stability after a generation of chaos. The troops are also there at the request of the government and are supported by the people in the country. The Taliban and other warlords have very little popular support.

#13 YOYO

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Posted 02 August 2010 - 09:41 PM

The war in Afghanistan is useless and the Taliban are no threat to Canada, which means we should get out of there. The Taliban were created by the States to fend of the Russians and ultimately bankrupt them.

#14 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 02 August 2010 - 09:49 PM

The Taliban were created by the States to fend of the Russians and ultimately bankrupt them.


You, my friend, ought to read up a little more on the subject before you make silly statements like that.

http://en.wikipedia...._in_Afghanistan

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taliban

http://en.wikipedia....een#Afghanistan
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#15 YOYO

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Posted 04 August 2010 - 10:14 PM

"Brzezinski, known for his hardline policies on the Soviet Union, initiated in 1979 a campaign supporting mujaheddin in Pakistan and Afghanistan, which were run by Pakistani security services with financial support from the CIA and Britain's MI6. Part of the CIA program was led by their elite Special Activities Division and included the arming, training and leading of Afghanistan's mujahideen.[27] This policy had the explicit aim of promoting radical Islamist and anti-Communist forces to overthrow the secular communist People's Democratic Party of Afghanistan government in Afghanistan, which had been destabilized by coup attempts against Hafizullah Amin, the power struggle within the Soviet-supported Parcham faction of the PDPA and a subsequent Soviet military intervention."

http://en.wikipedia....ski#Afghanistan

#16 Phil McAvity

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Posted 23 August 2010 - 07:58 AM

^You posted one link, VicHockeyFan posted three. VHF FTW!

I'd tell the Taliban this:

"Go **** yourselves, we are here to kill you."


We can also take comfort knowing that the Taliban are one of the few military forces on earth that have less might than Canada.

I remember the first time I heard about the Taliban around the turn of the millenium because they had destroyed a bunch of timeless architecture that was beautifully created out of rock valleys in the middle east and I remember thinking they were just a bunch of vermin. Everything they have done since has confirmed my opinion.
In chains by Keynes

#17 Bingo

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 09:53 PM

In the past the US has usually refused to comment on covert operations by their Special Forces. Now we have information on where the helicopter was shot down by insurgents using RPG's, how many were killed and even the names of some of the Seals.

Why the change in policy?

#18 Sparky

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Posted 08 August 2011 - 10:39 PM

In the past the US has usually refused to comment on covert operations by their Special Forces. Now we have information on where the helicopter was shot down by insurgents using RPG's, how many were killed and even the names of some of the Seals.

Why the change in policy?


The policy change is in the fact that the western world is leaving the middle east in a big way.

The west can not afford to finance middle east issues anymore .....even if oil is still at stake.

My take is that we will pull out our military force for a few years.....let the religious factions box it out amongst themselves....like they have been doing since the year 1 .....and then we will crawl back in .....during the dead of night....and suck the oil out of the ground when they are sleeping.....with a puppet administrator in place of course.

http://www.guardian....stan-night-raid

#19 LJ

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 08:21 PM

^Naahh, the dems will get voted out next year and our dirty tar sands oil will be beautiful again.
Life's a journey......so roll down the window and enjoy the breeze.

#20 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 09 August 2011 - 09:07 PM

^Naahh, the dems will get voted out next year and our dirty tar sands oil will be beautiful again.


The dems aren't denying any of our oil now. And I don't know if the Republicans can find a decent candidate, although I'd like to see Bobby Jindal take a run at it.
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

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