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[Bicycles] Issues with bicycles and cyclists in Victoria


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#1 http

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Posted 20 August 2008 - 12:59 PM

I am an avid cyclist, over 100 000 km, and I think bike lanes are wrongheaded in that they encourage separation instead of integration. Why should bicycles require special rules over and above the rules required of internal combustion powered vehicles?
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#2 Zimquats

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Posted 20 August 2008 - 01:12 PM

I would have thought "It's obvious".

#3 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 20 August 2008 - 01:38 PM

I am an avid cyclist, over 100 000 km, and I think bike lanes are wrongheaded in that they encourage separation instead of integration. Why should bicycles require special rules over and above the rules required of internal combustion powered vehicles?


Rightly or wrongly, lot's of folks won't bike without bike lanes. It encourages bicycle use.

We put white " - - - - " (broken?) lines down the road. Does that segregate traffic? Of course it does. In some cases, like on the highway, it seperates faster traffic from slower traffic. As long as cars have the right to pass bicycles on the left, we ought to find ways to segregate where possible and practical.

#4 Newlywednotnearlydead

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Posted 20 August 2008 - 02:00 PM

I am an avid cyclist, over 100 000 km, and I think bike lanes are wrongheaded in that they encourage separation instead of integration. Why should bicycles require special rules over and above the rules required of internal combustion powered vehicles?


I'm also an avid cyclist and I love bike lanes. I feel much safer on streets with a bike lane because, let's face it, there are a lot of terrible drivers and cyclists on the road. Bike lanes serve as a visible reminder to drivers to respect the space of cyclists and for cyclists not to be an idiot, keep right and not ride in the middle of a lane causing road rage behind them.

Besides, the most cycle-friendly cities in the world like Amsterdam and Copehagen have bike lanes, why wouldn't we want to follow their example?

#5 James Bay walker

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 07:42 PM

I am an avid cyclist, over 100 000 km, and I think bike lanes are wrongheaded in that they encourage separation instead of integration. Why should bicycles require special rules over and above the rules required of internal combustion powered vehicles?

I find areas with bike lanes reduce sidewalk cycling (somewhat).

jbw

#6 HB

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 08:14 PM

I find areas with bike lanes reduce sidewalk cycling (somewhat).

jbw



The only place where sidewalk cycling is an issue is in front of elementary schools at 830 am and again at 3 pm

Back up your claim with some photographs of all these people who are riding on sidewalks and commuting to places on sidewalks.. Id like to know where its happening because i never see it other than over at our place or rock bay landing.

#7 pherthyl

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 09:58 PM

I am an avid cyclist, over 100 000 km, and I think bike lanes are wrongheaded in that they encourage separation instead of integration. Why should bicycles require special rules over and above the rules required of internal combustion powered vehicles?


I know this thread is ancient, but I think you're nuts. Surely you enjoy dedicated bike lanes, since they are safer, quieter, and the air you breathe is cleaner. You seriously would rather feel "integrated" than have all those advantages? I don't buy it.

#8 James Bay walker

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 04:46 AM

The only place where sidewalk cycling is an issue is in front of elementary schools at 830 am and again at 3 pm

Sorry, that turns out not to be the case. As it's been an issue with me for many years in many areas including downtown (and I've rarely noted it near elementary schools and/or at those times of the day when in those areas).

jbw

#9 sdwright.vic

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 07:20 AM

The only place where sidewalk cycling is an issue is in front of elementary schools at 830 am and again at 3 pm.


I have to actually agree with jbw.... I as well have seen and complained on the helmet thread about sidewalk riders. I have seen it as well at numerous places around the city.

If bike lanes are stupid, then hey, let's get rid of sidewalks also. After all they encourage separation as well. I demand my right to walk where I want when I want. For that I also want to drive my car on median and sidewalks in rush hour.
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#10 patrick venton

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 09:48 AM

I understand bike lanes in the downtown core. Why there are bike lanes attracting bikers along major arterials where turning off either way causes a dangerous crossing over effect is in my observation. Playing games with large uncomfortable steel devices is really perplexing. There are plenty of side roads that go the same direction and they seem not to be biker targeted by the city. Dean St. is a far better ride for cyclists than Richmond and is only a few hundred feet east of Richmond and some, a few cyclists , use it . What is the attraction to stay close to steel danger. And why does the city not insist closing Richmond to cyclists and make them take a safe route up Dean St. This is an example of I think a better way to operate safely. It would save time , pain , and paint.

#11 rjag

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 09:53 AM

If bike lanes are stupid, then hey, let's get rid of sidewalks also. After all they encourage separation as well. I demand my right to walk where I want when I want.


Don't give the fine folks over at CARS any ideas!!!!

#12 James Bay walker

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 09:55 AM

And why does the city not insist closing Richmond to cyclists and make them take a safe route up Dean St. This is an example of I think a better way to operate safely. It would save time , pain , and paint.

An interesting concept (closing off areas of roads to bicycles, I've never seen that done anywhere) and sounds like a concept that has potential. Dean Avenue is one avenue I've not travelled. I suspect that it has lots of stop signs for someone on it paralleling Richmond (not that those would even slow down many cyclists) but perhaps it does not or those could be changed to yield signs.

For many travellers, it's "all about speed" (saving a few minutes or seconds along their route), and safety along with enjoying the trip are very secondary.

jbw

#13 patrick venton

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 10:07 AM

JBW, there are mini roundabouts all the way up Dean St.

#14 http

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 10:49 AM

I know this thread is ancient, but I think you're nuts. Surely you enjoy dedicated bike lanes, since they are safer, quieter, and the air you breathe is cleaner. You seriously would rather feel "integrated" than have all those advantages? I don't buy it.


Hiow refreshing! I'm more used to my character being derided than my sanity.

No, I don't enjoy them. The Motor Vehicle Act (if only it were properly enforced) provides a lot more clearance. Bike lanes make left turns problematic at best. There is no noticeable difference in volume or air quality. But mostly, they make dealing with autos making right turns (including parking) difficult. In practice, many drivers become erratic and stop telegraphing when making a right turn off a roadway with a bike lane. More than a few will, partway through, decide to come to a stop to let me by, thinking I've some special privilege. I don't, and it screws up the smooth flow of traffic for me and everyone behind me and them - because like HELL I'm going to pass on the right when a car's turning right.

I know my perspective is not the party line - but having spent almost a decade as a bike courier, I have little fear of traffic. While I don't feel as zippy now as twenty years ago, I still have no problem taking a left turn off Douglas at Fort St, for example. Less experienced cyclists may not see it the same way I do, but I think that having the infrastructure enforce a maximum skill level useable in traffic is counterproductive in the long run.
"Who are those slashdot people? They swept over like Mongol-Tartars." - F. E. Vladimirovna

#15 patrick venton

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 11:17 AM

It not playing the party line . The" only" point is safety. This is the china playing in the bull shop. Lots of bulls. Pure stupidity to play with bulls. You will lose if you make contact, that is why vehicles have their cargo on the inside. Bicycles have their cargo on the outside. Thats why the police and ambulance call you "Organ Doners" , be you Dead Right.

#16 D.L.

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 11:24 AM

An an avid cyclist too I find many bike lanes to be unnecessary. And I fully agree about designating secondary streets as cycling routes. When I attended Camosun college Haultain and Dean Streets were the way to go. Forget Bay and Richmond, take the bike lanes off those streets.

The Off-Broadway bike route in Vancouver is an excellent example of this

#17 Bingo

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 01:27 PM

An an avid cyclist too I find many bike lanes to be unnecessary. And I fully agree about designating secondary streets as cycling routes.


Bike lanes can be a false sense of security. If I can't use secondary roads, or the Goose, I take the car.

#18 sebberry

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 02:07 PM

But how do you encourage planet saving transportation methods without bike lanes? Won't the planet spin out of its orbit around the sun if we get rid of bike lanes and ask cyclists to ride down the residential roads?

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#19 patrick venton

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 02:18 PM

kinda like cops plugging off a whole lane plus the cycle lane for an infraction, to show the people where the Bear pooped in the buckwheat....

#20 SamCB

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 03:39 PM

Physically separated bike lanes are the answer. Green paint and an empty buffer zone simply won't do. Victoria needs to plan for the future and invest in serious bicycling infrastructure.

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