Jump to content

      













Photo

Times Colonist


  • Please log in to reply
621 replies to this topic

Poll: The Times Colonist: Will it survive? (1 member(s) have cast votes)

The Times Colonist: Will it survive?

  1. Yes - The TC will always be here as a daily paper (17 votes [20.99%])

    Percentage of vote: 20.99%

  2. Yes - but not a daily (26 votes [32.10%])

    Percentage of vote: 32.10%

  3. Yes - but Internet only (13 votes [16.05%])

    Percentage of vote: 16.05%

  4. No - it is no longer viable (25 votes [30.86%])

    Percentage of vote: 30.86%

Vote Guests cannot vote

#41 gumgum

gumgum
  • Member
  • 7,069 posts

Posted 02 March 2009 - 09:18 PM

I don't think A Channel's going. I heard...stuff.

#42 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Suspended User
  • 52,121 posts

Posted 02 March 2009 - 09:25 PM

I don't think CFAX is going anywhere either. It makes money quite nicely, albeit from a handful of advertisers. I buy a fair amount of radio ad space, and rates have not gone down at all. That would be a sign of desperation, and I don't see it from ZONE, Q, or CFAX, that I mostly buy from.

The TC has it tougher to adjust rates, because their salespeople are union and make a good base, with little made up in bonus/commission. So if they have a sale/cut-rate deal, it loses money no matter what, under their existing labour contract. Radio is more flexible, but again, I have not seen them doing deals. Radio relies on "morning drive", "pm drive" and "listen-at-work" etc. and few people have satellite radio or internet in their cars, or an internet feed to watch all the time, or TV to watch at work. At home, where the TV is, that's a whole new story.

#43 mat

mat
  • Member
  • 2,070 posts

Posted 02 March 2009 - 10:12 PM

I don't think CFAX is going anywhere either. It makes money quite nicely, albeit from a handful of advertisers. I buy a fair amount of radio ad space, and rates have not gone down at all. That would be a sign of desperation, and I don't see it from ZONE, Q, or CFAX, that I mostly buy from.

The TC has it tougher to adjust rates, because their salespeople are union and make a good base, with little made up in bonus/commission. So if they have a sale/cut-rate deal, it loses money no matter what, under their existing labour contract. Radio is more flexible, but again, I have not seen them doing deals. Radio relies on "morning drive", "pm drive" and "listen-at-work" etc. and few people have satellite radio or internet in their cars, or an internet feed to watch all the time, or TV to watch at work. At home, where the TV is, that's a whole new story.


The big problem is that all local radio, print and TV is owned by large corporations that need to make big cuts - and their view is from offices in Toronto, Winnipeg; and with world-wide shareholders and investors.

Victoria and Vancouver Island media mean little in terms of the total conglomerate.

CFAX and TC do well, in fact very well, for ad buy - makes them ripe for a sale. The problem is there is nobody nationally with the financing, or direct cash, to buy under Canwest, and their bankers, terms.

#44 Holden West

Holden West

    Va va voom!

  • Member
  • 9,058 posts

Posted 02 March 2009 - 10:19 PM

^What about Black Press buying up Vancouver Island content? Imagine a return to a locally-owned daily.
"Beaver, ahoy!""The bridge is like a magnet, attracting both pedestrians and over 30,000 vehicles daily who enjoy the views of Victoria's harbour. The skyline may change, but "Big Blue" as some call it, will always be there."
-City of Victoria website, 2009

#45 victriviaqueen

victriviaqueen
  • Member
  • 48 posts

Posted 03 March 2009 - 02:22 PM

For me, CFAX has always been there. It was a fixture in our kitchen in the morning growing up and now it is part of my commute. It is still a viable part of our community and I truly cannot imagine it disappearing.

The TC was always there as a kid (actually I think we got the Colonist before it merged with the Times, but that's not terribly relevant) but as an adult, the only time I read it is when I get a free copy on the bus or a link to an online story. If it disappeared, it would be strange but not unexpected.

To be without any local TV station, otoh, would be weird. While I fully supported the New VI and also the Arts channel that applied for a local license years back, the resulting upstart was a trainwreck. Since Hudson Mack took on the role of news director (and hired Stephen Andrew), the station has turned around to become the stronger player locally. Still, since they lack weekend coverage, I do watch CHEK to see which pets are missing and who crashed where. I feel very isolated when local news is missing from my TV; it's one of the main reasons we initially held back from satellite service. I have to say, though, if local news goes, my Shaw cable account is likely going to be cut.
http://frugalvictoria.com "Living for less in the City of Gardens"

#46 Newlywednotnearlydead

Newlywednotnearlydead
  • Member
  • 187 posts

Posted 06 March 2009 - 11:11 AM

^What about Black Press buying up Vancouver Island content? Imagine a return to a locally-owned daily.


I would really enjoy seeing a small, locally-owned daily newspaper that focuses on local issues. Not that the TC is horrible, but if I want the big picture, I'd rather read the Globe and Mail. I'd love to see an interesting daily newspaper that actually breaks news and challenges the local politicians and bigwigs.

As far as Canadian TV goes, I frankly don't see why CTV and Global even exist. I can watch American shows on their American networks, why bother licensing US TV shows? Canadian content can work if it's good, shows like Corner Gas and even Trailer Park Boys attracted a fairly sizable and loyal following.

#47 mat

mat
  • Member
  • 2,070 posts

Posted 06 March 2009 - 10:20 PM

I would really enjoy seeing a small, locally-owned daily newspaper that focuses on local issues. Not that the TC is horrible, but if I want the big picture, I'd rather read the Globe and Mail. I'd love to see an interesting daily newspaper that actually breaks news and challenges the local politicians and bigwigs.

As far as Canadian TV goes, I frankly don't see why CTV and Global even exist. I can watch American shows on their American networks, why bother licensing US TV shows? Canadian content can work if it's good, shows like Corner Gas and even Trailer Park Boys attracted a fairly sizable and loyal following.


Local news, especially print, is in an interesting situation. The Canwest west coast papers (TC, VanSun and Province) are the cash cows - they all have profits which means they will be the last to go in any Canwest sale or reorganization.

The problem for the TC is they no longer have the staff to really cover local news (and in fact their mandate was Nanaimo south) - especially online, the content should be completely local (not Vancouver Gang Wars - as the lead for today), and refreshed every hour.

We won't get a truly local news (and I mean news) paper, until the TC is bought out by an entity that believes and supports local investigative journalism; or it fails - and a new paper can take its place.

#48 Holden West

Holden West

    Va va voom!

  • Member
  • 9,058 posts

Posted 09 March 2009 - 09:22 PM

Here's a good example of the economics of the mainstream press. Here's an emotionally devastating article in yesterday's Washington Post, written by one of the country's top feature writers. This one story required 500 hours of interviews, along with the work of numerous editors, technicians, researchers, designers and photographers. It cost many thousands of dollars.

Who would pay the bills for this in the world of new media? Or would we simply do without this type of reportage?

I was listening to a radio program featuring a lecture by a media expert on the new new reporting reality. The lecturer was talking about the turmoil in the mainstream media but that in time, new media would eventually pick up the pieces. An audience member wanted to know how it would be financed. The lecturer eventually conceded that reporters of the future would have to settle for a lot less income (probably closer to what we Vibrant Victoria forumers make for our posts than what a Times Colonist or Black Press employee makes for their work).
"Beaver, ahoy!""The bridge is like a magnet, attracting both pedestrians and over 30,000 vehicles daily who enjoy the views of Victoria's harbour. The skyline may change, but "Big Blue" as some call it, will always be there."
-City of Victoria website, 2009

#49 mat

mat
  • Member
  • 2,070 posts

Posted 09 March 2009 - 10:56 PM

holden - good post, and totally relevant in describing the local and national media environment.

The TC online this evening has a prime news story on Ian Thow -



now tell me he will get a fair trial with that huge pic...

#50 Newlywednotnearlydead

Newlywednotnearlydead
  • Member
  • 187 posts

Posted 09 March 2009 - 11:04 PM

It's probably time for a new business model. I hope we're on the cusp of a media revolution using electronic readers like the Kindle where instead of getting a paper delivered, you plug your reader in and download today's paper. That would cut down considerably on the costs and basically mean your only costs would be staff and advertising. The days of a dead tree edition are probably coming to an end, which is fine with me. If it means more money for good local journalism, I'd be thrilled to subscribe.

They may also want to adopt a business model that encourages user donations. Many political magazines rely on supporter donations to keep them afloat, magazines like the National Review and The Nation would probably have died long ago without donors.

#51 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Suspended User
  • 52,121 posts

Posted 09 March 2009 - 11:20 PM

It's probably time for a new business model. I hope we're on the cusp of a media revolution using electronic readers like the Kindle where instead of getting a paper delivered, you plug your reader in and download today's paper. That would cut down considerably on the costs and basically mean your only costs would be staff and advertising. The days of a dead tree edition are probably coming to an end, which is fine with me. If it means more money for good local journalism, I'd be thrilled to subscribe.

They may also want to adopt a business model that encourages user donations. Many political magazines rely on supporter donations to keep them afloat, magazines like the National Review and The Nation would probably have died long ago without donors.


Isn't there a way we could have news based on the Wikipedia model? I trust Wiki 90% of the time. Constant updates by folks to make sure it is as accurate as possible. Or maybe that doesn't work, as updates will be made by popular opinion of facts, rather than by those that were at the news-making scene.

#52 Newlywednotnearlydead

Newlywednotnearlydead
  • Member
  • 187 posts

Posted 10 March 2009 - 08:18 AM

Isn't there a way we could have news based on the Wikipedia model? I trust Wiki 90% of the time. Constant updates by folks to make sure it is as accurate as possible. Or maybe that doesn't work, as updates will be made by popular opinion of facts, rather than by those that were at the news-making scene.


That's an interesting idea, I think crowdsourcing by interested amateurs could work because it wouldn't be much different than forums like this and there is quite often some very interesting journalism that happens on community forums. I'd imagine that there would have to be two tiers of participation, maybe something like a "trusted user" status that would allow you to make changes and "contributor" status that would allow you to suggest changes for a trusted user to consider.

However, while this approach would probably be great for the more factual, event based reporting, it wouldn't neccessarily lend itself to the indepth investigative journalism that could break a major story.

#53 mat

mat
  • Member
  • 2,070 posts

Posted 10 March 2009 - 10:43 AM

I have been trying to get onto the TC website for the past 2 hours and keep getting "server too busy" - anyone else experiencing the same problem?

11:53 - looks like all Canwest online news websites are down. National Post, VSun and TC are coming back with server timeout errors

12:24 - all canwest websites back up. Looks like they had a temporary server problem

#54 LJ

LJ
  • Member
  • 8,987 posts

Posted 10 March 2009 - 11:44 AM

I like my morning paper. I want to sit and have coffee and read the paper, I don't want to have to sit and read a computer screen.
Life's a journey......so roll down the window and enjoy the breeze.

#55 yodsaker

yodsaker
  • Member
  • 1,280 posts

Posted 10 March 2009 - 03:03 PM

I like my morning paper. I want to sit and have coffee and read the paper, I don't want to have to sit and read a computer screen.

I do both but prefer a paper in my hand.

#56 Caramia

Caramia
  • Member
  • 3,835 posts

Posted 10 March 2009 - 08:56 PM

I prefer a magazine - like the Douglas, or Focus... with researched articles, and information on my local community.
Nowadays most people die of a sort of creeping common sense, and discover when it is too late that the only things one never regrets are one's mistakes.
Oscar Wilde (1854 - 1900), The Picture of Dorian Gray, 1891

#57 G-Man

G-Man

    Senior Case Officer

  • Moderator
  • 12,747 posts

Posted 11 March 2009 - 07:49 AM

I like a morning paper still too.

#58 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Suspended User
  • 52,121 posts

Posted 11 March 2009 - 08:45 AM

It's a huge couple of days for Canwest Global. Today is the end of their credit extension, and Friday they owe a $38M payment on notes. This could be do or die.

http://www.theglobea...PStory/Business

#59 Koru

Koru
  • Member
  • 715 posts

Posted 11 March 2009 - 08:52 AM

I must say, I enjoy my morning paper, helps the monotony of the slow starts to the morning up in the crane...

On another note, I grew up delivering the Times Colonist w/my mom and little brother to a good part of the Cook St. Village area of South Fairfield, as well as relief delivery in other areas of Victoria over the years and it provided a lot of income for me as a elementary, junior high and senior high student. My little brother, now 18, has quite a lot of money saved up and is going to be entering his 3rd year of university in the fall (yes...he'll be 19 when he starts 3rd year...) completely debt free, he has held no other job than delivery Victoria's daily as well as bi-weekly newspapers and has hence paid for Uni via paper delivery and has 5 figures saved up in GIC's as well as a result of delivery...

I had my first route w/the pennysaver (for those that remember it...) when I was bout 6 or 7, and delivered it on my own, I graduated to Victoria News and then the Times Colonist. I can't deny, I'll shed a small tear if the TC was to see an untimely death as a memory of my childhood and upbringing would no longer be

#60 gumgum

gumgum
  • Member
  • 7,069 posts

Posted 11 March 2009 - 11:19 AM

Maybe this thread title needs to be changed? It's not really about the physical size of the paper.

You're not quite at the end of this discussion topic!

Use the page links at the lower-left to go to the next page to read additional posts.
 



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users