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Health care in Victoria


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#161 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 11:47 AM

What I would love to see is a city-wide waitlist. If you wanted a family doctor, you'd throw your name on the one list. As soon as a doctor had any openings, admin staff would reach out to the top people on the list. As it stands right now, the only way to get a family doctor is either to stalk the Victoria Medical Society site and be one of the first to call when a new listing appears, or do some untraditional canvassing and get lucky. It seems like a lot of work to go to just to find out whether I have dry hair from inheriting my mother's hypothyroidism or from never paying for a haircut.

 

I know a person that paid a doctor $1000 to get in.  Well, that's not quite true.  He sold a car to the doctors wife, for $1,000 less than asking.  Car was hers and bam he had a family doctor.


Edited by VicHockeyFan, 06 October 2017 - 11:48 AM.

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<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#162 FirstTimeHomeCrier

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 11:56 AM

I know a person that paid a doctor $1000 to get in.  Well, that's not quite true.  He sold a car to the doctors wife, for $1,000 less than asking.  Car was hers and bam he had a family doctor.

 

#LateStageCapitalism



#163 Bingo

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 01:10 PM

I know a person that paid a doctor $1000 to get in.  Well, that's not quite true.  He sold a car to the doctors wife, for $1,000 less than asking.  Car was hers and bam he had a family doctor.

 

However...if the car turns out to be a lemon I would let let the doctor perform your next brain surgery.


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#164 Greg

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 01:11 PM

#LateStageCapitalism

 

All systems can be gamed. Including capitalism. But the fact that it is illegal for doctors to set up private practice makes it pretty clear that the system being gamed here is definitely NOT capitalism. BTW, check out this option if you main interaction with clinics is getting straightforward prescriptions refilled. It might prove more efficient for you.

 

http://vivacare.ca/telehealth.html


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#165 FirstTimeHomeCrier

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 01:19 PM

All systems can be gamed. Including capitalism. But the fact that it is illegal for doctors to set up private practice makes it pretty clear that the system being gamed here is definitely NOT capitalism. BTW, check out this option if you main interaction with clinics is getting straightforward prescriptions refilled. It might prove more efficient for you.

 

http://vivacare.ca/telehealth.html

 

We're still operating within a capitalist system, and even social programs can't be totally divorced from that. It's like trying to run an Android app on an iPhone.

 

Thanks for the link, though. I will look into whether this is an option for me.



#166 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 02:48 PM

Lilia Zaharieva says living with cystic fibrosis meant thinking her life had no future.

 

Over the space of one year, Zaharieva said her lung functioning declined 10 per cent. The expected rate of decline for a person with the disease is one to two per cent.

 

"It's quite terrifying," she told All Points West host Jason D'Souza. "I was losing the ability to do so many of the things that make me who I am. To be out in the world, to be productive, to be connecting. That's the most difficult part: to not be able to participate in my life."

 

Last year, the fourth-year student at the University of Victoria says she was put on the drug Orkambi — which targets the underlying causes of cystic fibrosis caused by a specific gene mutation — not just the symptoms. Her quality of life dramatically improved.

 

But Orkambi is expensive, costing about $250,000 per year per patient and B.C.'s provincial health plan does not cover it.

And on Sept. 1, her student coverage for the drug ended.

 

Zaharieva said her doctors have said that without it, she may have as little as two years left to live.

 

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...rosis-1.4301795

 

 

I'm really not sure what to make of this.  She believes the drug is keeping her healthy.  Experts say there is no clinical proof, in general terms, that the drug works.

 

 

"In early 2017, there was a large and unprecedented increase in the utilization of prescription drug benefits and the [UVSS] plan faced unsustainable cost increases," wrote Mackenzie Cumberland, the students' society's director of finance and operations.

 

"With this information, the 2016/2017 UVSS Board of Directors made the decision to adopt a provincially-managed formulary, B.C. Fair Pharmacare, which is used by most student health plans in B.C.

 

"This was necessary in order to maintain a health and dental plan at all."

 

Cumberland said it is impossible for the students' society's medical plan to pay for Orkambi, but supports provincial coverage of the drug.

 

 

 

Also, what's with that spike above?  What would cause that?


Edited by VicHockeyFan, 06 October 2017 - 02:52 PM.

<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#167 FirstTimeHomeCrier

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 03:06 PM

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...rosis-1.4301795

 

 

I'm really not sure what to make of this.  She believes the drug is keeping her healthy.  Experts say there is no clinical proof, in general terms, that the drug works.

 

 

 

 

Also, what's with that spike above?  What would cause that?

 

Medical marijuana?



#168 sdwright.vic

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 07:32 PM

As someone who lived in the US system and ours... just so you know, to be able to accept HMO insurance as a doctor, an thus get HIM reimbursements, you must agree to accept HMO pricing for you patients as a private physician. What's the difference?

I worked for a doctors office when I lived in NYC. To accept XYZ insurance, the doctor had to agree to accept XYZ's payment for service plus whatever copay. Seems alit like our system, except without the copay, and instead of the Government setting a fee structure, the insurance company is. Just like in the state's, a doctor here can charge what they want if someone doesn't have insurance/ health care.
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#169 Nparker

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Posted 29 March 2019 - 10:18 AM

Measles has arrived in the CRD.

Island Health has confirmed two cases of measles on the South Island, saying both people acquired the infection while travelling abroad and then sought care in Greater Victoria. The health authority is advising people who were at the following locations on the dates and times listed may have been exposed to measles.

 
March 6, 2019 5 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.      Royal Jubilee Hospital, Emergency Department
March 8, 2019 7 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.      Royal Jubilee Hospital, Outpatient clinic
March 9, 2019 8:36 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Royal Jubilee Hospital, Emergency Department

https://www.cheknews...th-says-547594/

 



#170 Kungsberg

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Posted 06 April 2019 - 06:17 AM

Downtown Victoria medical clinic faces closure because of doctor shortage

The Yates and Quadra Integrated Health Centre is likely to close in June

https://www.vicnews....octor-shortage/

 

- The Yates and Quadra Integrated Health Centre has been in operation for over 18 years, offering both family practices and a walk-in clinic that’s open 363 days a year. However, a sudden loss of medical staff may force the doors closed.

 

-  Two doctors are returning to their homeland, Ireland, while another doctor is retiring after 40 years of practice. With three doctors down, the clinic is unsustainable, forcing another three doctors to search for positions at alternative clinics beginning in June.

 

“It’s near impossible to recruit more doctors at a community clinic,” Houston said. “If a new student takes up a job at the hospital they earn 30 to 40 per cent more, and work less hours.”


Edited by Kungsberg, 06 April 2019 - 06:32 AM.


#171 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 06 April 2019 - 06:22 AM

Still, Houston has managed to recruit three more doctors for the clinic to begin at the end of June with a caveat: he needs funding from the province.

 

“I’ve requested $23,000 per month from the ministry,” Houston said. “If those patients were to go to the emergency it would cost four times as much for the exact same thing.”

 

 

 

Houston said he initially put the request in to several provincial leaders in January, including to Finance Minister Carole James and Health Minister Adrian Dix, but has not heard back.

 

Houston said that the province is focusing on more primary care centres, such as the new Westshore Primary Care Centre, but that resources aren’t being distributed strategically.

 

“The Westshore clinic isn’t functioning well because they can’t recruit the doctors; I’ve got the doctors but I don’t have the funding,” Houston said.


Edited by Victoria Watcher, 06 April 2019 - 06:22 AM.


#172 uvicubcsfu

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Posted 23 May 2019 - 09:41 PM

My family doctor moved out of the province 2 years ago and since then I've been relying on walk-in clinics which have been a mixed experience. Recently I signed up for an online clinic called Ubiquity Health. So far the experience has been great, don't have to wait an hour and I can do the appointment from home or work. The doctor was very nice and knowledgeable. Will help reduce visits to the walk-in for sure.



#173 SimonH

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 08:15 AM

My family doctor moved out of the province 2 years ago and since then I've been relying on walk-in clinics which have been a mixed experience. Recently I signed up for an online clinic called Ubiquity Health. So far the experience has been great, don't have to wait an hour and I can do the appointment from home or work. The doctor was very nice and knowledgeable. Will help reduce visits to the walk-in for sure.

We used EQVirtual a couple of times and had mixed experiences.

 

My wife had a repeat prescription fulfilled no problem.

 

I had a cough/cold/sore throat and ear ache and was told they weren't allowed to diagnose/prescribe where an ear ache (infection?) was a symptom.



#174 spanky123

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 09:20 AM

My family doctor moved out of the province 2 years ago and since then I've been relying on walk-in clinics which have been a mixed experience. Recently I signed up for an online clinic called Ubiquity Health. So far the experience has been great, don't have to wait an hour and I can do the appointment from home or work. The doctor was very nice and knowledgeable. Will help reduce visits to the walk-in for sure.

 

Online services are great for getting prescriptions filled (note that they are restricted in what they can prescribe), dealing with routine referrals, and diagnosing some minor ailments. I am sure that removes some off the pressure off of the clinic system. 

 

Lets face it though, anything that requires a doctor to physically examine you isn't going to work. 


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#175 Mike K.

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 09:46 AM

Sooke is getting a private medical clinic soon, to be operated by Michael Forbes of the Forbes Pharmacy chain.


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#176 spanky123

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 09:57 AM

Sooke is getting a private medical clinic soon, to be operated by Michael Forbes of the Forbes Pharmacy chain.

 

Makes sense, isn't Mr. Forbes one of our better known pot suppliers as well (through his various holdings in pot companies)?

 

https://www.timescol...nths-1.23655716


Edited by spanky123, 24 May 2019 - 09:58 AM.


#177 LJ

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 07:50 PM

And methadone supplier.


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#178 Matt R.

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Posted 24 May 2019 - 11:22 PM

And brewery owner.

Matt.

#179 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 25 May 2019 - 04:09 AM

he also operates a gaming company.


Edited by Victoria Watcher, 25 May 2019 - 04:11 AM.


#180 dasmo

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Posted 02 June 2019 - 07:17 AM

In the largest settlement involving a pharmaceutical company, the British drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline agreed to plead guilty to criminal charges and pay $3 billion in fines for promoting its best-selling antidepressants for unapproved uses and failing to report safety data about a top diabetes drug, federal prosecutors announced Monday. ..... The three criminal charges involved Paxil, Wellbutrin and Avandia and included a criminal fine of $1 billion. The remaining $2 billion involves fines in connection with a civil settlement over the sales and marketing practices of the blockbuster asthma drug Advair and several other drugs.

https://www.nytimes....oUo4xOdSbcH4uUA

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