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The Climate Change / Global Warming Debate


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#2021 Mike K.

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 05:26 AM

Isn’t the spraying of glyphosate in our forests extremely, and I mean extremely, limited it its application?

Aspen is a low value wood that does not mesh with forestry harvesting so it’s controlled whenever possible, but that’s been the case for generations.

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#2022 dasmo

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 09:20 AM

Isn’t the spraying of glyphosate in our forests extremely, and I mean extremely, limited it its application?

Aspen is a low value wood that does not mesh with forestry harvesting so it’s controlled whenever possible, but that’s been the case for generations.

But the forest fire in Lejac is only 100 hectares. That's nothing right? 

To say that Aspen has low value is simply not true. "The relatively low density of aspen is an advantagein manufacture of particleboard because moderate pressure will bring the individual particles into close contact, ensuring a medium-density board with good strength. In general, nail-holding power varies with specific gravity,with the result that Populus species have about the samece to hold nails and other fastenings"   Go to page 161 and beyond. http://www.cfs.nrcan.../pdfs/12011.pdf

Plus it has value as a fire break, is part of the ecosystem of a forest reducing long term management costs. Killing the forest of it's biodiversity also has repercussions to other industries some unknown as of yet. Kinda like we just figured out that we actually need the bees....

Spraying herbicides in the forest is a low cost method to maximize the "best" crop yield which is pine and fir. It is short term thinking at the expense of the future.  Meanwhile the news is reporting the death of cedar trees due to climate change.... 

Forget the carbon tax. This is something that is NOT abstract. Think global ACT LOCAL! 



#2023 Mike K.

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 09:23 AM

It’s like a weed. It spreads incredibly quickly and can stifle growth of small saplings by rapidly outgrowing them, so it needs to be controlled.

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#2024 dasmo

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 09:33 AM

It's not a weed, it's a pioneer species establishing first after fires. If it was invasive and prevented the growth of anything else we would be living in an Aspen forest right now.... 



#2025 Mike K.

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 09:39 AM

A pioneer species! I like that term.


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#2026 dasmo

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 09:40 AM

Change the policy to allow for say 25% and incorporate it's harvest into the industry which would more than pay for the added cost of hacking it back to get to that coverage rate. Particle board is a pretty popular product. Make it from no VOC glue and you have a premium product that would be in demand all over the world. 



#2027 dasmo

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 09:41 AM

A pioneer species! I like that term.

It's not my term. https://www.nrcan.gc...nces/fire/13149



#2028 tommy

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 02:37 PM

A pioneer species! I like that term.

what if they called it a colonist species?



#2029 tommy

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 02:42 PM

...you know this link is to an article about boreal forest... 

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  • CFS_Boreal_876px_E.jpg


#2030 dasmo

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 10:38 AM

Yes but the section I was referring to was not about boreal forests but rather boreal species which the Aspen is. Aspen is also part of our forests here in BC. It's not an invasive species. Our clearcuts basically emulate what a fires does. Once they replant they want to promote the growth of Fir and Pine that they plant. This basic premise is fine to me but they way it's done is not. 

 

"After a fire, forest regeneration on burned sites begins with the establishment of pioneer species, notably aspen, white birch, jack pine and lodgepole pine. All of these species require full sunlight to thrive, and all are well adapted to landscapes where fires regularly recur.

Aspen and birch are able to re-establish quickly by sprouting from stumps and roots of burned trees. These species are also able to recolonize burned sites by producing abundant seeds that can be blown by wind over long distances.
Jack pine and lodgepole pine have serotinous cones (protected by a waxy coating) that require the heat of fire to release their seeds. Fire also produces favourable conditions for the seeds of these pines to germinate. Nutrients are released in the soil, mineral soil is exposed, competing species are eliminated and the amount of sunlight on the forest floor is increased. Both jack and lodgepole pine depend on fire to regenerate."

 

Why have it be mandated for so little of them to be in our managed forests? If they move in first then could there be a management policy to let a larger percentage of them go for a bit then harvest those trees first to make way for the conifers. You know, something that is actually a sustainable long term industrial practice instead of just spraying poison into these managed forests for the cheapest, forget about the future, gain. 


Edited by dasmo, 16 May 2019 - 11:47 AM.


#2031 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 17 May 2019 - 03:45 AM

D6uvrEtWsAAVouz (1).jpg_large.jpg

 

singapore

spain

uk

"mountains"

china

europe

spain

south africa

russia

sweden

adirondacks

canada

australia

alaska

 

now if we are to believe the headlines and all these jurisdictions have warming higher than the world average where are all the articles about the places where warming is slower than the global average?


Edited by Victoria Watcher, 17 May 2019 - 03:47 AM.


#2032 Mike K.

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Posted 17 May 2019 - 05:19 AM

Nobody wants to write about our cool spring, I guess.

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#2033 spanky123

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Posted 17 May 2019 - 07:31 AM

Well as we pointed out in the report on Canada warming 2x as fast as the rest of the world, if you pick the start and end periods that match your desired outcome, you can come up with pretty much any stat you want.



#2034 Mike K.

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Posted 17 May 2019 - 07:41 AM

Right now the stat is that it’s freezing outside.

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#2035 spanky123

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Posted 17 May 2019 - 07:46 AM

Right now the stat is that it’s freezing outside.

 

Every time the weather is a degree warmer than normal CFAX runs extended global warming coverage. A degree cooler and crickets.



#2036 dasmo

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Posted 17 May 2019 - 02:14 PM

Roundup lawsuits coming to this side of the border. 

"The lawsuit highlights a lack of oversight in Canada over products like Roundup, Merchant says. He says the product isn’t tracked as closely by federal authorities as medical devices or medications, which means that there isn’t a large pool of historic data on cancer rates and Roundup."

https://www.ctvnews....ancer-1.4426068



 



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