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#1 sebberry

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Posted 31 December 2010 - 07:17 PM

As I posted in the Nanny State thread the government is taking our lightbulbs away from us.

Well, some of them.

After current inventory is sold, 75w and 100w bulbs will no longer be sold after Jan 1, 2011.

According to a Wikipedia chart, a 100w light bulb outputs 1700 lumens of light, or 17 lumens per watt of energy used. A 75w bulb outputs 1200 lumens of light, or about 16 lumens per watt.

Interestingly, lower wattage bulbs produce less light per watt than higher wattage bulbs. So, in the interest of efficiency I suggest the lower-wattage bulbs be banned and let us keep our 75w+ bulbs. You can always dim the brighter bulbs if you're worried about saving money.


In the event that not everyone knows this, you cannot put a regular CFL bulb into a socket with a dimmer switch. There are some CFL bulbs on the market that can be dimmed, but they're expensive, may require special dimmers and don't dim as nicely as incandescent or halogen bulbs.


For a while I had CFL bulbs in my hallway. They were bright but I hated them. Colour rendering was all screwy and they couldn't be dimmed. I replaced the fixtures with halogen fixtures and replaced the switches with dimmers. IMO, they're much more elegant and easier on the eyes. It's nice to be able to dim them for ambient background lighting. If you have a hallway with two light switches, some dimmers allow for dimming control from both switches.


If you ever crack open a CFL bulb here's what you find:



Yes, all of that inside a lightbulb.

So, if you need the bright light, find some nice halogen fixtures and stick them on a dimmer if you're concerned about energy use. Then promptly tell the government to go shove their bulb bans where the light *don't* shine.

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#2 kenjh

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 08:53 PM

the part that bothers me is that each cfl bulb has a drop of mercury in it .I have broken many bulbs in my years..at what point do or did I poison myself?? and how can they destroy an industry ( light bulb manufacturers)that are causing no harm and less danger then what they mandate we HAVE to use??

#3 sebberry

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 09:11 PM

the part that bothers me is that each cfl bulb has a drop of mercury in it .I have broken many bulbs in my years..at what point do or did I poison myself?? and how can they destroy an industry ( light bulb manufacturers)that are causing no harm and less danger then what they mandate we HAVE to use??


In BC it doesn't really make sense. Our energy generation is very clean. In places where coal and and oil is used for power generation you're much less likely to be affected by the drop of mercury in your lightbulb than you are by the mercury emissions from the power plant.

Just don't drop the bulb ;)

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#4 Bernard

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 09:29 PM

It does make sense here to be more energy efficient because we are part of a larger grid that is predominantly powered through coal, in fact over night a lot of the power we use in BC comes from US or Albertan coal fired power stations or nuclear power stations.

That said, I am not impressed with the CFLs, they do not last nearly as long as predicted in any location with fluctuating power, which is what we seem to have in Victoria. I am waiting for LED lightbulbs to really come on to the market.

#5 Sparky

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Posted 03 January 2011 - 10:28 PM

It does make sense here to be more energy efficient because we are part of a larger grid that is predominantly powered through coal, in fact over night a lot of the power we use in BC comes from US or Albertan coal fired power stations or nuclear power stations.


Bernard, I know that through your land acquisition work you have been privy to certain information. The average British Columbian however, has no idea where his power is coming from when he is asleep and the grid police are switching from one dirty source to another.

I wonder if you could paint a bit of a simple picture for us all as to how our hydro system works. This is an especially interesting topic as we are about to enter an era where the Columbia River Treaty is about to be reviewed.

WAC Bennett would roll in his grave if he knew how we are not being paid appropriately by the US in accordance with that treaty.

#6 Bernard

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 08:50 AM

The quick situation of power generation in BC.

We are part of the Western Interconnection - this is a grid that extends from Central BC down to Northern Baja California. In Canada it also includes Alberta, in the US it includes basically the 11 western states. This grid moves power back and forth through out it at the speed of light - a watt produced in Alberta can be used in Mexico. Power can not easily flow into the Eastern, Quebec or Texas interconnections.

Here in BC we produce almost all of our power from hydro, most of it from large scale storage hydro. What BC Hydro does is that over night it slows down the flows through the dams and imports excess power from Alberta and the US - most coal fired and nuclear power plants can not easily ramp up or ramp down their power production. The upshot is that overnight they produce too much power. This excess power has to be gotten rid off, much of it is dissipated in special heat circuits close to the power plants, but some of it is sold to BC for a almost nothing.

Come morning BC Hydro ramps up the power production and sells excess power into the grid for daytime peak use for a decent profit. Hydro dams can be regulated minute by minute for how much power they produce - the only source I know that can be operated in a 'just in time' manner.

Because here in BC there have been long time barriers to adding new power production, we do not produce enough electricity to meet our own needs, we need coal and nuclear power in the US and Alberta to keep the lights on. Most of that power does come from the US.

Sparky, I am not sure what your issue with the Columbia RIver treaty is as I think it is working as planned

The Columbia River treaty was signed in 1960. BC agreed to build three dams on the Columbia river to allow for better control of water down stream to the US so that more power can be produced in the US. Half of what are called the 'downstream benefits' belong to BC and the province can either sell that power to the US or have it delivered to BC. BC has chosen to sell the power and made about $250 million a year on it - about 6 cents per KwH, a decent current rate for that power.

#7 Hotel Mike

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 09:04 AM

My advice is where practical, skip right to LED lights. They have a much more pleasant light than CFLs, last longer than halogen and burn more efficiently. It's mass stupidity to force people to opt for a lighting system that is ugly and in the end will be laughed at as being horribly inefficient and out of date.

#8 sebberry

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 09:10 AM

Thanks Bernard, that was interesting!

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#9 Sparky

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 09:33 AM

Yes, thanks Bernard nice work. I will refresh my memory and respond regarding the Columbia River Treaty. If my memory serves me correctly it was an "entitlement" that the BC residents were supposed to receive at a particular time that did not happen. I will do my homework.

#10 Holden West

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 10:11 AM

Thanks, Bernard. I've often wondered why we import power.

Meanwhile:

http://www.centennialbulb.org/
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#11 Bernard

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 12:16 PM

Yes, thanks Bernard nice work. I will refresh my memory and respond regarding the Columbia River Treaty. If my memory serves me correctly it was an "entitlement" that the BC residents were supposed to receive at a particular time that did not happen. I will do my homework.


For a long time all the money from the downstream benefits went towards building the three dams.

#12 davek

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 04:17 PM

If we can't by regular light bulbs, I wonder if legislation permits us to buy http://www.mnn.com/e...-as-heat-balls'>heat balls?

#13 Bernard

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 05:04 PM

If we can't by regular light bulbs, I wonder if legislation permits us to buy http://www.mnn.com/e...-as-heat-balls'>heat balls?


Unfortunately the government has banned them even though they are more efficient as sources of heat than standard electric baseboard heaters

#14 Sparky

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 05:41 PM

Here is the quote from WAC Bennett from 1976 regarding the last 30 years of the Columbia River Treaty that has been haunting me for years.

"Nothing is going to be freer than free and when we get full payment from the States and nothing is going to be greater. in the last 30 years of this treaty getting all this American power for nothing!"

http://webcache.goog...lient=firefox-a

Now I have to find the clause in the treaty that he was referring to.

#15 sebberry

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 05:44 PM

Will I still be able to buy bathroom heat lamps?

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#16 Holden West

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 07:04 PM

If we can't by regular light bulbs, I wonder if legislation permits us to buy heat balls?


That's hilarious. It's like the story that came out today about the raw milk producers in BC that are skirting the law by calling their illegal milk "massage cream".
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#17 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 07:10 PM

After current inventory is sold, 75w and 100w bulbs will no longer be sold after Jan 1, 2011.


These should sell real well...


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#18 Holden West

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 07:14 PM

^So you're saying people will use two 60 watts (120 watts) instead of a single 100 watt? :P
"Beaver, ahoy!""The bridge is like a magnet, attracting both pedestrians and over 30,000 vehicles daily who enjoy the views of Victoria's harbour. The skyline may change, but "Big Blue" as some call it, will always be there."
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#19 concorde

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 08:44 PM

The ban on light bulbs doesn't start until next year

http://www.reuters.c...529253520070425

#20 Sparky

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Posted 04 January 2011 - 09:22 PM

The province of BC receives an entitlement for various reasons. BC originally sold 30 years of "entitlement" upfront for some $254 M to pay for the construction of the dams. For the last 7 or 8 years we are supposed to receive a massive amount of electricity at the border. For the last 7 or 8 years we should have been able to reduce the price of electricity to consumers, not increase it, and we should not have to build more dams. I think we have been had once again.

"Canadian Entitlement
Sharing the benefits of cooperative water management was an integral part of the Treaty's design. In exchange for providing and operating the Treaty storage projects for power, Canada received "entitlement" to one-half of the estimated downstream power benefits generated in the United States. Canada initially sold its share of this additional power for $254 million to a group of U.S. utilities for a period of 30 years. This agreement expired in 2003. Since then, the full Canadian Entitlement to downstream power benefits is delivered to the Province of British Columbia at the U.S.-B.C. border for their use or resale."

http://www.crt2014-2...ntitlement.aspx

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