Jump to content

      













Photo

Local place names - First Nations vs. later names


  • Please log in to reply
186 replies to this topic

#181 Rob Randall

Rob Randall
  • Member
  • 9,963 posts

Posted 09 April 2018 - 03:16 PM

CHEK has posted this on their page:

 

*Out of respect for cultural protocol, we are not using any images of him until he is memorialized.*

 

 

I've never heard of this. You learn something new every day.


"[Randall's] aesthetic poll was more accurate than his political acumen"

-Tom Hawthorne, Toronto Globe and Mail


#182 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Suspended User
  • 52,121 posts

Posted 09 April 2018 - 03:26 PM

EDIT:  Oh, CHEK says this:

 

*Out of respect for cultural protocol, we are not using any images of him until he is memorialized.*

 

^  Welcome to 3:33pm today!


Edited by VicHockeyFan, 09 April 2018 - 03:26 PM.

<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#183 David Bratzer

David Bratzer
  • Member
  • 480 posts

Posted 09 April 2018 - 11:30 PM

Well, if you google the story, you will see google has all the old cache with the photos, so they changed them all after the initial publish, every single media outlet.  Well, TC, CHEK and Black Press, anyway.

 

Also seems like a bad idea, having hereditary chiefs, no?   Who gets to decide if that ever changes, nobody?

 

Also, he was 70, and it was a "sudden passing".   Seems odd not to have more info.

 

Well, at least the Times-Colonist still has a photo from the animal cruelty charges back in 2015:

 

The chief of the Esquimalt First Nation and his wife face two counts each of animal cruelty.
 
Andrew Thomas and Mary Anne Thomas are charged with causing unnecessary pain, suffering or injury to an animal and neglecting or failing to provide necessities, the B.C. SPCA said.
 
The Thomases were released on the condition that they not possess animals. They are scheduled to appear in court on Oct. 22.
 
The B.C. SPCA responded to a call about a sick dog tethered outside a home in July.
 
B.C. SPCA Const. Erika Paul said the dog “was heavily matted, filthy, with several abscess sites, the most critical of which was the eye — it had been left for an extended period, to the point it was ruptured and had to be removed.”

Edited by David Bratzer, 09 April 2018 - 11:31 PM.


#184 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Suspended User
  • 52,121 posts

Posted 10 April 2018 - 05:34 AM

To be fair, charges were eventually stayed.
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#185 David Bratzer

David Bratzer
  • Member
  • 480 posts

Posted 10 April 2018 - 08:39 PM

To be fair, charges were eventually stayed.

 

It is fair to point that out. At the same time, my personal view is that this may have been an appropriate case for a special prosecutor. Andrew Thomas had served as the hereditary chief of the Esquimalt First Nation for more than 40 years when, in 2015, the BC SPCA announced he would face criminal charges for animal cruelty. He was a powerful man with resources and influence at his disposal. On a number of occasions he was engaged in litigation against both the Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia. Millions and millions of dollars were at stake. Appointing a special prosecutor would have ensured independence and resolved any lingering questions about how and why these animal cruelty charges were resolved.



#186 David Bratzer

David Bratzer
  • Member
  • 480 posts

Posted 10 April 2018 - 08:48 PM

It is fair to point that out. At the same time, my personal view is that this may have been an appropriate case for a special prosecutor. Andrew Thomas had served as the hereditary chief of the Esquimalt First Nation for more than 40 years when, in 2015, the BC SPCA announced he would face criminal charges for animal cruelty. He was a powerful man with resources and influence at his disposal. On a number of occasions he was engaged in litigation against both the Government of Canada and the Province of British Columbia. Millions and millions of dollars were at stake. Appointing a special prosecutor would have ensured independence and resolved any lingering questions about how and why these animal cruelty charges were resolved.

 

Just one other thing to point out. Here is an example in British Columbia of a case, involving a First Nations chief, where a special prosecutor was appointed:

 

Victoria - The BC Prosecution Service (BCPS) announced today that Special Prosecutor Brock Martland has approved one charge of sexual interference of a person under the age of 16 years against Roger William, elected Chief of the Xeni Gwet’in First Nation. The offence is alleged to have occurred on or about May 12, 2017, in Williams Lake, British Columbia. Chief William’s first appearance on this charge is scheduled today at Williams Lake Provincial Court on court file number 34880.
 
Mr. Martland was appointed a Special Prosecutor on August 28, 2017, shortly after a Report to Crown Counsel relating to this charge was received by the BCPS. Assistant Deputy Attorney General Peter Juk, Q.C. appointed Mr. Martland under s.7 of the Crown Counsel Act because he considered it in the public interest to do so. The appointment of a Special Prosecutor is intended to avoid any potential for real or perceived improper influence in the administration of justice.
 
Mr. Martland is a Vancouver lawyer in private practice. He was given a mandate to provide legal advice to the RCMP investigators as may be necessary, conduct any related charge assessment and assume conduct of the prosecution if charges were approved. 

Edited by David Bratzer, 10 April 2018 - 08:48 PM.


#187 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Suspended User
  • 52,121 posts

Posted 11 April 2018 - 05:37 PM

The Esquimalt Nation consists of 150 people on reserve and another 100 living off, in various parts of the world.

 

So less people in total than live at View Towers.  

 

http://www.esquimalt...onoverview.html

 

100125_aerial_2.jpg


Edited by VicHockeyFan, 11 April 2018 - 05:38 PM.

<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

 



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users