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Dams - Rivers - Fish


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#1 Bingo

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 07:11 AM

With Vancouver Island rivers drying up and threatening this years salmon runs, what is the solution?

Do we raise the levels of the existing dams, build more weirs along with fish ladders, increase the number of hatcheries?

A recent decision to remove a small dam in Sooke, may not be helping the situation.
Vancouver Island dam removal could end salmon run, critics say

The drought also threatens Cowichan Valley drinking water, jobs, salmon, sewage treatment.

"If we don't get rain in the next three weeks, the Cowichan could run dry."
That could mean temporarily closing the Catalyst Pulp and Paper Mill in Crofton - with about 600 employees - an unknown effect on drinking water for communities that rely on the aquifer under the river, such as Duncan,

Read more: Drought threatens Cowichan Valley drinking water, jobs, salmon, sewage treatment

#2 Mike K.

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 07:33 AM

Before we take any drastic actions I'd say we wait several years to see if this is a trend. We had a similar dry spell about a decade ago, and then in the first week of November when the rains finally came they didn't stop until spring!

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#3 Bingo

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 03:41 PM

Before we take any drastic actions I'd say we wait several years to see if this is a trend. We had a similar dry spell about a decade ago, and then in the first week of November when the rains finally came they didn't stop until spring!


Maybe, but it takes forever to get anything done. The McKenzie interchange, the deer problem, UVIC rabbits, changing the name of the city...and so on.

#4 eseedhouse

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 06:27 PM

Well, in any event they are predicting some heavy rain for next Saturday as the current high pressure ridge breaks down. Check Cliff Mass Weather Blog (scroll down to the bottom to see the forecast and map).

#5 Bingo

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Posted 05 November 2015 - 05:53 PM

British Columbia’s iconic Adams River salmon run, a spectacular natural event that has become an international magnet for tourism drawing up to 250,000 visitors a year, appears to have collapsed.

Instead of 1.2 million fish, as was hoped for in preseason forecasts, only about 3,000 sockeye have returned to the river, which flows into Shuswap Lake, about 75 kilometres northeast of Kamloops.

Last year, about four million fish were expected (after 3.8 million spawned four years earlier) but only 700,000 returned.

This year’s run was expected to number at least 200,000 based on 2011 returns, and early forecasts predicted as many as 1.2 million fish.

At 3,000 spawners, it is the worst return ever on that cycle; the next lowest year was 1939, when 16,000 fish came back.

Mr. Cooperman said the small return represents “a very frightening crash,” and two successive poor years should set off alarm bells.

http://www.theglobea...rticle27113272/

 



#6 Mike K.

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Posted 05 November 2015 - 09:52 PM

I wonder if there was as much hysteria back in the 30's? I wish we could just let nature be nature without having to fret over any change to what we consider our accepted normal.

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#7 Bingo

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 01:36 PM

Fish farm eviction notice

In 2014, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled the Tsilhqot'in First Nation — and in turn all other First Nations in Canada — can have aboriginal title to lands outside of native reserves.

At the time, experts predicted that unless First Nations got a greater say in how their traditional territories were being used, B.C. would soon be awash in new protests and new legal cases. 

Now, two years later, those predictions appear to be coming true.

Last weekend, the Musgamagw Dzawada'enuxw First Nation served a 72-hour eviction notice on a fish farm at the north end of Vancouver Island.

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...tests-1.3737728

 


Edited by Bingo, 28 August 2016 - 01:47 PM.


#8 Bingo

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Posted 28 August 2016 - 01:52 PM

Speaking of sturgeon 

 

A young fishing guide based in Lillooet is enjoying some extra attention after he and some friends reeled in a huge white sturgeon known as Pig Nose this week.

It happened late on Tuesday on the Fraser River near Lillooet after a long day without much to show for it.

Once Pig Nose had been caught, McCabe, who takes part in a voluntary program to monitor the threatened Fraser River white sturgeon population, checked it for a tag.

"I was given a tagging kit with microchips, so every fish I catch, I scan completely, and if it's a recapture I take the length and the girth of the fish and record that and if he's not tagged, I insert a microchip into him," he said.

Pig Nose already had a rice grain-sized microchip implanted several years earlier.

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...aught-1.3736474

 

 



#9 Bingo

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Posted 05 November 2016 - 10:36 AM

Chum return largest on record 

 

Record numbers of chum salmon — two million fish — returned to B.C's West Coast this year, bringing good news for fishermen fatigued by word of record lows of Fraser River sockeye.

"We've had significant abundances ... it's all good news," said Jennifer Nener, Fisheries and Oceans Canada's regional salmon director, earlier this week.

That news got even better with the Johnstone Strait haul hitting 1.3 million fish.

"Fraser River chum salmon return is estimated to be two million, the largest return on record," said Lara Sloan of Fisheries and Oceans Canada in an email to CBC Friday.

At first there was supposed to be a lottery for who got to fish commercially, he said, but returns were so strong fishing was opened up to anybody.

"Everybody was catching fish from the top of the straights up towards Alert Bay all the way down to Campbell River. We were catching fish everywhere," said Strobel, who described loads of fish weighing down boats and threatening to break or sink nets.

"That fishery has now gone 'terminal' ... the river is full of fish. At this point there is no room for further fish to spawn anyway."

So it's open season on chum, a salmon old-timers used to throw back.

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...evels-1.3837854

 



#10 Bingo

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Posted 07 November 2016 - 01:28 PM

Nanaimo River fish rescue.

 

“Salmon trying to run up the river to spawning grounds they can’t reach,” says Uve Broedys.

“Yeah it’s just heartbreaking,” says Nanaimo resident James Reinfelder.

So the Nanaimo man alerted officials.

But he says weeks later, the fish are still there and dying by the hundreds without spawning, after extreme rainfall raised rivers and sent them flooding into a strip of river cut off by a landslide many years ago.

Officials at the Nanaimo River Salmon Hatchery say there’s nothing they can do.

Locals are now rescuing the stranded salmon from shallows and carrying them by hand to deeper water.

http://www.cheknews....s-river-237277/

 



#11 Bingo

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Posted 07 November 2016 - 07:58 PM

Stuff dumped near Goldstream included...another/same one?.... corn snake.

 

Piles of household and industrial garbage have been tossed just meters away from the stream.

“You can totally tell those bags are from a reno job. People don’t want to go and pay for it at the dump, so they dump it on the reserve and forget about it” says Patrick Leon of the Tsaoout First Nations.

“We’ve been fishing here every year and we’ve never seen this before” says George-Ann Horne. “We bring our nieces here to teach them how to do this, to keep the traditions going strong of our people.

To find this, it’s just really sad to see this on our territories.”

Items like shoes, carpets and clothes were spotted in the mounds of trash, along with toxic materials such as batteries and dry wall.

The most shocking discovery was a corn snake, an exotic pet, found barely clinging to life.

http://www.cheknews....al-park-237280/

 

 



#12 sebberry

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Posted 07 November 2016 - 08:19 PM

Some people need to be made to swim with the fish guts in the river.


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#13 Mike K.

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Posted 08 November 2016 - 05:15 AM

How do we know it didn't originate from their territory?

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#14 HB

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Posted 08 November 2016 - 05:56 AM

Ive been to the area and unlike what the media reported it is not inside Goldstream Park it is in a small Indian reserve along the river directly east of the Nature house. It is accessed off Finlayson Arm rd right at the base of Mt Finlayson before the road goes up hill. there is a small access road to the reserve which is located behind a yellow gate. there is a lot of garbage back there and there is no way of knowing where it came from or who dumped it.It just didn't happen this week its an ongoing issue



#15 Bingo

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Posted 16 November 2016 - 11:25 PM

Central Saanich police are looking for whoever illegally dumped between 150 and 200 salmon at Thompson Place.

The salmon, which appeared fairly fresh, were discovered in the 8200 block of Thompson Place, off Mount Newton Cross Road, on Tuesday, but might have been dumped over the weekend, said police spokesman Cpl. Dan Cottingham.

Cottingham said investigators spoke with fisheries experts, who suspect the discarded fish were all males — undesirable for those wishing to harvest fish roe, or eggs, often used for sushi.

- See more at: http://www.timescolo...h.qTlROYRo.dpuf



#16 HB

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Posted 17 November 2016 - 06:14 AM

WTF?

The fisheries officer SUSPECTED that they were all males?

Just look at them no suspecting needed.

That's obviously not the reason they were discarded.

The sexes of the fish are easily identified when they are spawning.

No need to be surprised that you pulled out a male and it has no eggs.

Who wrote that story? a child?



#17 Bingo

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 12:34 PM

 

“After seeing the steelhead that spring we were rather alarmed by the amount of fish actually wanting to go upstream” Mike Gage told CHEK News. And different species kept coming all that year. 

The problem is they couldn’t get past the 4 metre high dam that was built in 1958 to divert some water from the Salmon River to the Campbell River system for power generation.

Even the fish ladder built at the time wasn’t working and only about 5% to 10% of returning fish made it upriver.

“The advantage of having this dam removed is just enormous” said Gage.

“It’s the last place probably on Vancouver Island for the snowpack to leave each year so it’s the coolest water. Cool water is so important for spawning fish.”

http://www.cheknews....-summer-288832/


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#18 AllseeingEye

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 08:03 PM

 

 

“After seeing the steelhead that spring we were rather alarmed by the amount of fish actually wanting to go upstream” Mike Gage told CHEK News. And different species kept coming all that year. 

The problem is they couldn’t get past the 4 metre high dam that was built in 1958 to divert some water from the Salmon River to the Campbell River system for power generation.

Even the fish ladder built at the time wasn’t working and only about 5% to 10% of returning fish made it upriver.

“The advantage of having this dam removed is just enormous” said Gage.

“It’s the last place probably on Vancouver Island for the snowpack to leave each year so it’s the coolest water. Cool water is so important for spawning fish.”

http://www.cheknews....-summer-288832/

 

Great news, hope this happens. He's right about the cold water temps in that watershed.

 

When we were fishing the area last year at the junction of the Campbell and Quinsam Rivers I stumbled over a submerged boulder and fell in ass over tea-kettle into the Campbell River. This was on a warm sunny day in September but damn near froze everything below the eyeballs. IOW however its perfect habitat for salmon and we should do anything and everything we can to maintain if not enhance the region to ensure it stays that way.



#19 HB

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 09:10 PM

A big reason fish cant get past dams or other obstructions on rivers such as waterfalls is that some hatcheries release the salmon above the obstructions an d he salmon imprint on the part of the river where they were first release and that is an issue. A local hatchery which is guilty of this is the Goldstream hatchery which is located upstream of a large waterfall in the Goldstream Park campground and in the Victoria watershed property upstream of Japan Gulch chlorination plant. When the salmon are released instead of transporting them below the falls they are released above.

then each fall hundreds of Coho get as far as the falls and that is it. they try to jump the falls but can so the pool at the base of the falls ends up with hundreds of dead coho and Chinook that are not spawned out. The Chum however don't make it that far up the river and are successful. removing dams is a good thing.

The Elhwa dam and Glines dam removal were a great success for salmon over there



#20 Bingo

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Posted 18 August 2017 - 09:13 PM

Jennifer Nener, director of salmon management for the Pacific region of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, says some Indigenous communities that were evacuated during wildfires in the Interior missed the opportunity to catch fish to sustain them through the winter.

Nener says the department held an 18-hour monitored fishery around the mouth of the Fraser River until Friday morning, allowing Indigenous groups to fish for pink and chum salmon and keep mortally wounded or injured sockeye while healthy sockeye had to be released.

http://www.timescolo...-dfo-1.21999830

 



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