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#21 Bingo

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Posted 22 August 2017 - 09:00 PM

Solar eclipse blamed.

Thousands of Atlantic salmon have escaped into Pacific waters east of Victoria after nets containing an estimated 305,000 fish were damaged at a U.S. fish farm in the San Juan Islands on Saturday.

The company, Cooke Aquaculture, blamed "exceptionally high tides and currents coinciding with this week's solar eclipse" for the failure of the net pen near Cypress Island.

Atlantic salmon are not native to Pacific waters, but are a major aquaculture species in Washington state and British Columbia.

Their presence in fish farms — and potential to escape from net cages — has been a hotly debated part of the West Coast fish farm industry for years, due to concerns about whether the foreign fish could cause harm to the five wild species of Pacific salmon.

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...4257369?cmp=rss

The virus that fish farm opponents are looking for on the B.C. coast this summer is called piscine reo-virus, or PRV, which may cause a deadly salmon disease called Heart and Skeletal Muscle Inflammation, or HSMI.

There's no debate that it's present on fish farms, even the B.C. Salmon Farming Association says most fish on farms are infected with PRV.

If PRV does cause the disease and if it's transferred to wild fish, that's a big concern, because wild salmon need to be marathon swimmers — with healthy hearts — to escape predators and migrate upstream to spawn.

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...lture-1.3687385



#22 On the Level

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 06:46 AM

Isn't salmonella (no pun intended) in chicken a fairly recent issue; from the 1970s forward?  The infection was treated, but became rampant from cramming a large number of chickens into small areas.  The industry simply gave up and now consumers have to worry about touching infected raw chicken.

 

I wonder if the same will happen to Salmon, albeit a different virus?



#23 lanforod

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 09:26 AM

^ should call it 'chickenella' to complete the confusion.



#24 Mike K.

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 10:46 AM

Lol!

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#25 aastra

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 10:56 AM

 

^ should call it 'chickenella' to complete the confusion.

 

What about Nutella?



#26 Bingo

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Posted 23 August 2017 - 11:05 AM

most fish on farms are infected with PRV.

 

 

That's the problem with fish that are watching too much recorded medical programming.


Edited by Bingo, 27 August 2017 - 07:49 AM.


#27 Bingo

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 07:52 AM

SEATTLEWashington Gov. Jay Inslee has directed the Department of Ecology to put on hold any new permits for net pens after thousands of Atlantic salmon escaped into Puget Sound earlier this month from a damaged salmon farm. The state has also set up a website that officials say will be updated "as we learn more about this incident and work with tribes and our fellow state agencies to find a solution to this serious threat to our native salmon species." Washington has the largest marine finfish aquaculture industry in the U.S. with farms producing about 17 million pounds of Atlantic salmon each year, according to the state.

http://www.timescolo...cape-1.22196436

 



#28 Bingo

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 07:02 AM

BC Hydro’s timber crib dam on the Salmon River is now gone.

Work to fully remove the dam and clean up the dam footprint was completed last week. Crews are now restoring and shaping the riverbed in preparation for the coho run this fall.

“When fish passage was opened up in the 1970s through the removal of a downstream natural barrier, it allowed salmon to fully migrate up to the dam,” Says We Wai Kai Nation Chief, Brian Assu. “Then this facility and the impacts to fish passage became an issue for us. For coho to have unhindered fish passage this fall, for the first time, up into that prime upstream habitat is a wonderful feeling. We’re very pleased.”

There are up to about 30 people working on the site. Some of the other project work includes the Paterson Creek wooden flume that was part of the diversion canal. The flume has been removed and crews will be stating to remove the concrete piers and restoring a section of creek channel.

See video  http://www.alberniva...-diversion-dam/

 

 



#29 Bingo

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Posted 23 January 2018 - 11:20 AM

A father and his 15-year-old daughter are dead after fast-moving water pushed their all-terrain vehicle over in Woods Creek south of Campbell River on Sunday.

The family lives within a few hundred metres of the creek and crosses it regularly on the ATV, Beck said. Most of the time, it’s easy to cross, he said, but Saturday’s heavy rainfall had swollen the creek, with some areas five to six feet deep.

“It was raging — the water levels were extremely high.”

Paul Berry of Comox Valley Search and Rescue said along with significant water flows, there were many hazards in the creek, including trees where someone could be pinned.

http://www.timescolo...iver-1.23151304

 



#30 Bingo

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Posted 29 January 2018 - 03:17 PM

 

An atmospheric river storm event is impacting Vancouver Island throughout the day. Rainfall amounts so far today have been in the 100-130 mm range on Western Vancouver Island, 40-55 mm around Port Alberni, 35-90 mm around Courtenay and surrounding areas, 30-70 mm around Qualicum Beach and Parksville, and 30-50 mm around the Nanaimo region. Temperatures have also been rising, most notably on the west side of Vancouver Island, with observed temperatures in the sub-alpine at automated snow weather stations reaching the 2-4˚C range this afternoon. Snow melt at mid-elevation (300-800m) is expected to contribute to river runoff. 
River levels have begun to rise in response to this rainfall. Peak levels will depend on the amount of rainfall that continues overnight tonight. Environment Canada has a rainfall warning in effect for the region, indicating the potential for further rain this evening and Monday morning. As of 5:45pm elevated rainfall rates (3-8 mm/hour) are still being observed. Rivers are expected to continue to rise overnight, and peak on Monday.

http://bcrfc.env.gov...s/flood_008.htm

 



#31 Bingo

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Posted 23 July 2018 - 07:27 AM

Sunscreen a suspect in the dying of the Cowichan River.

 

“Whenever there’s a hatch, it’s magic,” muses Saysell, a long-retired logger and fishing guide. “It’s like shimmering snow flurries. You watch the flies whirling above the river and up into the tree branches looking for mates.”

 

But these mornings, he doesn’t watch. There’s no point. The insects have all but vanished. Hatches that once began in mid-April and continued into July, he says, are now finished in a scant two weeks.

There are other factors, of course. New property-holders who strip the willows that provide critical insect habitat from the banks to mistakenly improve cosmetics — mistakenly because soon they’re frantically replanting to prevent erosion of their river frontage.

Logging that’s altered the seasonal flows of the river. Industrial water extraction for a pulp mill and use of the river to dilute municipal sewer effluents. Climate change.

The chief concern for Saysell, though, is the slick left on the water by swimmers who are widely advised to slather on sunscreen to protect themselves from harmful solar radiation.

Saysell, who has spent more than 60 years on the Cowichan and knows it as well as he knows his own skin, worries that the hatches of winged insects are vanishing because of sunscreen residues left by tourists who drift the river’s beautiful upper reaches during the summer on inflated inner tubes and air mattresses.

Scientific research increasingly suggests that Saysell’s worries have genuine merit.

 

 

A growing sheaf of studies shows that the tiniest components that are added to sunscreen to block harmful ultraviolet rays — nanoparticles of titanium dioxide, copper oxide, zinc oxide and cerium oxide, so tiny it takes 100,000 of them to make up the width of  human hair — pose grave risks to small aquatic organisms.

http://www.timescolo...iver-1.23375231


Edited by Bingo, 01 August 2018 - 09:33 AM.


#32 lanforod

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Posted 23 July 2018 - 07:55 AM

^ not really surprised. There is a reason they tell you not to touch the water at Botanical Beach. Even a tiny amount of sunscreen will harm the sea life in those pools.


Edited by lanforod, 23 July 2018 - 07:55 AM.


#33 sebberry

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Posted 23 July 2018 - 04:28 PM

First it's plastic bags, now sunscreen.  What next?


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#34 AllseeingEye

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Posted 29 July 2018 - 07:45 PM

Can completely believe this; I've been fishing that river for nearly 40 years and the "hatch" is a mere shadow today of its former self -  not a good thing at all. Just look at the river on any hot summer day when upwards of a 1000 or more tubers descend on this sensitive ecosystem - in places the oily sheen from all that 'screen' is quite apparent.

 

The Cowichan is part of the Canadian Heritage Rivers system (designated as of 2003), and given its critical import not only for First Nations cultural activity and the tourism/recreational fishery industry, but as a major spawning area for multiple keystone fish species, more needs to be done IMO to preserve this unique resource including, if necessary, banning tubing altogether and shutting down all but FN traditional fishing activity - for however long it takes - for the river to recover.


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#35 sebberry

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Posted 29 July 2018 - 08:51 PM

I'm glad you said "traditional".  It's been suggested by some of my sport fishing friends that the FN fishery is playing a significant role in the depletion of salmon stocks. 


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#36 AllseeingEye

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Posted 01 August 2018 - 08:26 AM

/\...... I am aware of some of the practices you refer to that some FN's apparently utilize on certain river systems; I've only ever witnessed personally one such example (here on the island although not on the Cowichan); that said there is no doubt there are many more critical issues at play re: declining and depleted fish stocks and FN's are not among those. They include over-fishing by commercial interests and particularly diminished fish habitat ecosystems i.e. the Fraser River being perhaps the most notable of these, largely due to commercial/industrial development, damming of key fish-bearing rivers,and of course climate shift resulting in warming seas. In the larger context FN activity, traditional or otherwise, is only a very small part of a much bigger picture.



#37 Bingo

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Posted 01 August 2018 - 09:31 AM

Second tubing death

 

A volunteer firefighter, father and a driving force behind a Vancouver Island fundraiser for cancer research has died while tubing on the Cowichan River, his friends say.

Tony Jackson, who volunteered with the Sahtlam Volunteer Fire Department and Jeepapalooza in the Comox Valley, was reported missing Sunday.

It’s the second death in as many years linked to tubing on the Cowichan River.

 

In July 2017, a Duncan woman in her early 50s died while tubing with friends.

Police said at the time that the woman passed a “pullout” zone, fell off her tube trying to get to shore and got trapped under fast-moving water.

It’s unclear what happened in the latest incident.

http://www.timescolo...iver-1.23386027

 



#38 Bingo

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Posted 03 August 2018 - 09:37 PM

Sockeye salmon are on a mission up B.C.'s Fraser River right now, swimming "a marathon a day" to reach the gravel beds where they'll lay eggs for the next generation.

But the waters of the Fraser — historically one of the world's great salmon rivers — have been so warm this week, fisheries officials say the migrating sockeye are in danger of dying before they have a chance to spawn.

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...ature-1.4771607

 



#39 jonny

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Posted 04 August 2018 - 08:30 PM

So why did we stop opening new fish hatcheries? It seems to me that's the only hope for saving the salmon and the southern resident orcas.

#40 Bingo

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Posted 04 August 2018 - 08:56 PM

So why did we stop opening new fish hatcheries? It seems to me that's the only hope for saving the salmon and the southern resident orcas.

 

Maybe we also need to build more dams to store the cold water the fish need to survive.



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