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Hurricanes and Typhoons


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#1 Bingo

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 06:28 PM

With 25 million people in its path, one of the strongest tropical cyclones ever observed, Super Typhoon Haiyan, made landfall Friday morning in the Philippines, the country's weather service reported.

With sustained winds of 315 kph (195 mph) and gusts as strong as 380 kph (235 mph), Haiyan was likely the strongest tropical cyclone to make landfall anywhere in the world in recorded history. It will take further analysis after the storm passes to determine exactly if it is a record.

http://edition.cnn.c....html?hpt=hp_t1

#2 Bingo

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 06:21 AM

Tacloban city Mayor Alfred Romualdez told CNN it is "entirely possible" that 10,000 people may have died in the storm in Leyte province. His statement came after a top provincial police official, Elmer Soria, said local estimates suggest as many as 10,000 are feared dead in Leyte, according to AFP.



http://edition.cnn.c....html?hpt=hp_t1

#3 Bingo

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 06:57 AM



http://edition.cnn.c....html?hpt=hp_t1

#4 Bingo

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 10:25 PM

Tropical storm Harvey, formerly known as Hurricane Harvey is pounding away at Houston as 15 to 50 inches of rain is predicted through Friday.

 

Harvey knocked almost 15% of U.S. refinery capacity out of commission, which threatens to boost fuel prices across the country.

Energy markets could be in for a bumpy ride when they open Monday as investors try to gauge the impact of the disruption. After slamming into Texas on Friday and causing massive flooding in Houston over the weekend, the storm was moving east on Sunday toward a refining hub near the Louisiana border. That could shut down even more of the U.S. energy infrastructure.

https://www.wsj.com/...rain-1503851397

 



#5 Bingo

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 10:26 PM

That's quite a knockout punch to the gas prices, and Canadians will probably be on the canvas as well, before the bell rings.



#6 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 10:28 PM

Whatever. Harvey sucked. They had compared it to Katrina. Waaaaaay off.

One Mayor told the people that refused to evacuate to write their names and social security numbers on their forearms so they could be identified quickly once dead.

Lame er rooooo. Nobody died in that city.

Edited by VicHockeyFan, 27 August 2017 - 10:30 PM.

<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#7 Bingo

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Posted 27 August 2017 - 10:41 PM

Whatever. Harvey sucked. 

 

It was more like August Weather...not May Weather...

...yeah I know  :whyme:


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#8 Bingo

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Posted 28 August 2017 - 10:52 AM

Here are some of the mind-blowing facts and figures associated with Harvey and the unprecedented nature of the storm and resulting flood disaster.

  • 225 miles in 60 hours: Since its landfall on Friday night, Harvey has progressed at literally at a walking pace, about 3 to 4 mph on average, meandering a path of about 225 miles in 60 hours. Harvey is currently re-emerging into the Gulf of Mexico only 70 miles up the coast from where it made landfall Friday night.
  • 12.07 inches: In the more than 31,000 days since they have been measuring rainfall at Houston Hobby Airport (since 1930), the top two rainiest days were Saturday (12.07 inches) and Sunday (10.99 inches).
  • 9.92 inches in 1.5 hours: This is how much rain fell at a location approximately 3 miles south of Hobby Airport near Houston.
  • 20 feet in 4 hours: The water at White Oak Bayou in Houston rose this much in Sunday’s early morning hours (between 1 and 5 a.m.).
  • 194: This is how many tornado warnings the National Weather Service offices in Texas and Louisiana have issued since Thursday.

more http://www.cnn.com/2...-harvey-latest/


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#9 Bingo

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 04:22 PM

IRMA might be even worse.

 

As Hurricane Irma barreled toward the Caribbean on Tuesday -- on a path that could send the Category 5 megastorm toward Florida -- people up and down the state were starting to prepare for the worst. 

The hurricane packed maximum sustained winds of 185 mph late Tuesday afternoon and was traveling west at 15 mph, the U.S. National Hurricane Center reported in its 5 p.m. ET advisory.

The storm was roaring toward the Leeward Islands. Irma’s center was about 130 miles east of Antigua and approximately 135 miles east-southeast of Barbuda, the advisory said. 

Hurricane Allen hit 190 mph in 1980, a record for modern-day storms, while 2005's Wilma, 1988's Gilbert and a 1935 storm hitting the Florida Keys all had 185 mph winds.

http://www.foxnews.c...han-harvey.html

 



#10 lanforod

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 07:44 PM

Yipes for sure. Hunker down, or better off, get out of the way. I'm heading out to San Juan in December. These places weather major storms often, but not often one this big comes head on.



#11 LJ

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 07:50 PM

Yipes for sure. Hunker down, or better off, get out of the way. I'm heading out to San Juan in December. These places weather major storms often, but not often one this big comes head on.

We were planning on a trip to Miami and San Juan in October, but had to postpone for other reasons, Whew.

 

We were also scheduled to go on a cruise out of New Orleans 10 days after hurricane Katrina hit. The cruise company cancelled that one.

 

People want to know where we are travelling - so they can avoid the area.


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Life's a journey......so roll down the window and enjoy the breeze.

#12 lanforod

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 07:52 PM

I'm sure if there are major infrastructure issues in San Juan, St. Maartin or Haiti, our cruise will move elsewhere. I hope not though.



#13 Bingo

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 06:42 AM

Canadian airlines Air Transat and WestJet have sent planes to evacuate travellers from Dominican Republic as well as Turks and Caicos ahead of Hurricane Irma.

"Bahamas Prime Minister Hubert Minnis said his government was evacuating the six islands in the south because authorities would not be able to help anyone caught in the "potentially catastrophic" storm.

People there would be flown to Nassau starting Wednesday in what he called the largest storm evacuation in the country's history.

All aircraft should arrive in the Dominican Republic on the morning of September 6th, and passengers should be back in Canada in the afternoon or early evening," the airline said in a news release.

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...ublic-1.4276658



#14 Rob Randall

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 08:32 AM

And now some words of wisdom this morning from you know who:

 

“It looks like it could be something that will be not good. Believe me, not good."

 

-PRESIDENT DONALD J. TRUMP


Edited by Rob Randall, 06 September 2017 - 08:33 AM.

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"[Randall's] aesthetic poll was more accurate than his political acumen"

-Tom Hawthorne, Toronto Globe and Mail


#15 Bingo

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 12:18 PM

By early Wednesday afternoon the centre of the storm was 35 kilometres east-southeast of St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands and 150 kilometres east of San Juan, Puerto Rico and heading west-northwest at 26 km/h. 

Warm water is fuel for hurricanes and Irma was moving over water that was 1 C warmer than normal. The 26 C water that hurricanes need went about 80 metres deep, said Jeff Masters, meteorology director of the private forecasting service Weather Underground.

The U.S. National Weather Service said Puerto Rico had not seen a hurricane of Irma's magnitude since Hurricane San Felipe in 1928, which killed a total of 2,748 people in Guadeloupe, Puerto Rico and Florida.

"The dangerousness of this event is like nothing we've ever seen," Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rossello said. "A lot of infrastructure won't be able to withstand this kind of force."

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...4276642?cmp=rss

 



#16 jonny

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 12:19 PM

Whatever. Harvey sucked. They had compared it to Katrina. Waaaaaay off.

One Mayor told the people that refused to evacuate to write their names and social security numbers on their forearms so they could be identified quickly once dead.

Lame er rooooo. Nobody died in that city.

 

Sucked as in was awful, or sucked as in it wasn't as bad as Katrina in terms of life lost?



#17 Rob Randall

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 12:29 PM

You notice the Florida Keys on a map and you say, "Holy crap, people actually live on those tiny islands?" and you call up Google Street View and sure enough, hotels, restaurants and houses built right up to the beach and you think, yeah, that's not going to end well.


"[Randall's] aesthetic poll was more accurate than his political acumen"

-Tom Hawthorne, Toronto Globe and Mail


#18 jonny

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 12:35 PM

You notice the Florida Keys on a map and you say, "Holy crap, people actually live on those tiny islands?" and you call up Google Street View and sure enough, hotels, restaurants and houses built right up to the beach and you think, yeah, that's not going to end well.

 

That pretty much sums up the entire US coast from Texas to Carolina. Built up right to the coast on very flat land, either at, slightly above or slightly below sea level (New Orleans). People love their waterfront property. Some places, like Houston, were actually built on a bayou and on reclaimed land (which was very cheap back in the day). 

 

Yet, every time something awful happens from a hurricane, we're supposed to act like we're so surprised and shocked. 


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#19 Bingo

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 12:36 PM

Sucked as in was awful, or sucked as in it wasn't as bad as Katrina in terms of life lost?

 

I suppose you can talk about the loss of life as in the physical death of the body, or you can talk about the loss of life as in the emotional death where all you lost was your home, your belongings, your job and perhaps your relationship.

 

We still don't realize the impact of the forest fires here in BC, but there will be some pain from that for awhile, not to mention the lingering health issues of breathing in fly ash for most of the summer for those living in the interior.

And here we are complaining because we are getting a few days of ash settling on our vehicles.


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#20 jonny

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 12:38 PM

The highest point in Key West is 18 feet. They are talking about Irma causing a 12 foot storm surge. Yeah, that's going to be a mess. 



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