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Security vs Privacy


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#1 Bingo

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Posted 17 January 2015 - 07:14 AM

The documentary film "CITIZENFOUR" showing in Victoria, gives a first-hand account by Edward Snowden of how government surveillance has changed our world forever. It will make you think about everything you say in an email, in a phone call or when you use your credit card.

We are experiencing the privacy vs. security debate everyday with the pressing need gather information on the terrorists next move, down to a more personal level of finding out what our business associates, politicians and our partners are up to.

 

 

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a show of trans-Atlantic unity, President Barack Obama and British Prime Minister David Cameron pledged a joint effort on Friday to fight domestic terrorism following deadly attacks in France. They also strongly urged the U.S. Congress to hold off on implementing new sanctions on Iran in the midst of nuclear talks.

Cameron said he had called some senators Friday to make the case for holding off on new penalties.

The prime minister arrived in Washington with a request for Obama to help persuade U.S. technology companies to give governments more access to encrypted communications that terrorists may use to plot attacks. Cameron’s policy proposals have stoked concern on both sides of the Atlantic about the prospect of security efforts encroaching on privacy, particularly in the wake of the 2013 spying disclosures by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

‘‘As technology develops, as the world moves on, we should try to avoid the safe havens that would otherwise be created for terrorists to talk,’’ Cameron said.

Obama didn’t take a position on Cameron’s proposal, but he did say it was important to be able to keep tabs on terrorists who are using social media and the Internet.

‘‘When we have the ability to track that, in a way that is legal, conforms with due process, rule of law and oversight, then that’s a capability we have to preserve,’’ Obama said.

American Internet companies, concerned about keeping the trust of individual and commercial customers around the world, have sharply criticized government eavesdropping programs revealed by Snowden, the former NSA analyst. They have also publicly supported legislation aimed at restricting future surveillance.

In addition, Google, Facebook and other companies have expanded their own encryption programs to protect customers’ communications in the wake of the Snowden revelations.

http://www.bostonglo...vVHN/story.html

 

 



#2 Mike K.

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 08:09 AM

"‘‘When we have the ability to track that, in a way that is legal, conforms with due process, rule of law and oversight, then that’s a capability we have to preserve,’’ Obama said."

...or you just change the rule of law and oversight to conform with whatever it is you're up to.
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#3 sebberry

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 09:30 AM

You are 35,079 times more likely to die from heart disease than from a terrorist attack

You are 33,842 times more likely to die from cancer than from a terrorist attack

You are 23,528 times more likely to die from obesity than from a terrorist attack

You are 5,882 times more likely to die from medical error than terrorism.

You are  4,706 times more likely to drink yourself to death than die from terrorism.

You are 1,904 times more likely to die from a car accident than from a terrorist attack.

You are 2,059 times more likely to kill yourself than die at the hand of a terrorist.

You are 452 times more likely to die from risky sexual behavior than terrorism.

You are 353 times more likely to fall to your death doing something idiotic than die in a terrorist attack.

You are 271 times more likely to die from a workplace accident than terrorism.

You are more than 9 times more likely to be killed by a law enforcement officer than by a terrorist.

You are 110 times more likely to die from contaminated food than terrorism.

 

 

http://www.theburnin...ongering-works/


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#4 AllseeingEye

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 10:07 AM

The documentary film "CITIZENFOUR" showing in Victoria, gives a first-hand account by Edward Snowden of how government surveillance has changed our world forever. It will make you think about everything you say in an email, in a phone call or when you use your credit card.

We are experiencing the privacy vs. security debate everyday with the pressing need gather information on the terrorists next move, down to a more personal level of finding out what our business associates, politicians and our partners are up to.

Not terribly surprising coming from David Cameron given the UK/Britain has always had more 'statist' involvement in lives of private citizens than has the US until relatively recent decades. Britain didn't even acknowledge the existence of their domestic spy apparatus, officially, until the late 1980's. In fact their spy chief was never acknowledged, identified or named in the public press until 1992. And today as most people on VV are probably aware, London has the most CCTV's on the planet. I read somewhere the average Londoner can expect to show up on at least 8-10 different video surveillance systems throughout the course of their average day simply going about routine business.

 

Hell from the 1920's to the mid-60's MI6 occupied a building location identified by signage as the "Minimax Fire Extinguisher Company". Going further back before WWII in the interwar period in the UK you could be dragged into court and prosecuted merely for publicly mentioning the code letter/name of a deceased British spy chief.



#5 spanky123

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 10:51 AM

In general the public has become very complacent about security and privacy, viewing it as an acceptable trade-off for protection against terrorists and other state enemies. The government, in return, has rewarded us with a steady stream of anti-terrorist threats to validate that belief.

 

Even outside of Government surveillance we have seen recently that a private conversation with a partner can cost you a basketball team, a post in a private facebook group can cost you a career, and a confidential email can cost you a marriage.

 

You have to wonder what the next 5 years will look like. From a big data standpoint it is probably quite likely that you won't even need to say, type or do anything untoward to be singled out, it can all be predicted ahead of time.


Edited by spanky123, 22 January 2015 - 10:52 AM.


#6 AllseeingEye

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 11:30 AM

In general the public has become very complacent about security and privacy, viewing it as an acceptable trade-off for protection against terrorists and other state enemies. The government, in return, has rewarded us with a steady stream of anti-terrorist threats to validate that belief.

 

Even outside of Government surveillance we have seen recently that a private conversation with a partner can cost you a basketball team, a post in a private facebook group can cost you a career, and a confidential email can cost you a marriage.

 

You have to wonder what the next 5 years will look like. From a big data standpoint it is probably quite likely that you won't even need to say, type or do anything untoward to be singled out, it can all be predicted ahead of time.

I would agree spanky; I have a friend who is a senior environmental planner and has worked with some of the biggest engineering/environmental firms in Canada and abroad. He is 50+ and extremely suspicious about leaving an "electronic footprint" on the web, hence he has no Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter or similar public account etc. Regardless and with no effort I can find all sorts of references to him on the internet. He just sold his house in Nanaimo and is currently custom building a modular home "off the grid" i.e. with little or no footprint or dependence on public utilities for power, water, electricity etc. Intends to go uber-green and be as self sufficient as possible. Looking ahead I think even measures like this will not achieve anything practical in terms of shielding individuals from scrutiny.

 

His partner goes so far as to adamantly shun travel to the US because she doesn't want to "get onto the radar" of any American agency be that Border Services, Homeland Security, FBI...whatever. Admittedly she is a conspiracy aficionado in the extreme. I have tried to explain that she may as well go to and enjoy whatever Vegas or Florida or Southern California have to offer as it doesn't matter: "Big Government" in this country, never mind the US, already has files on all of us so measures like the above ultimately do little or nothing to "mask your trail". For better or worse you might as well accept it and move on as I don't believe the "privacy genie" can or will ever be put back into the bottle.

 

From a go-forward standpoint Big Government and especially Big Industry actually looks out far beyond 5 years from the perspective of the "future" and intelligence gathering or information harvesting, which is daunting purely from a privacy viewpoint. I used to work for Seagate Technology (the hard drive manufacturer, although I worked for the software division). In 1999 - 15 years ago - some of us from Vancouver were flown down to the Mother Ship in Scott's Valley CA and given a tour of the R&D facility. Of course we were under no illusion in terms of thinking we were exposed to all the "good stuff". Many areas were designated high security and strictly off limits except to authorized staff. The stuff being researched and considered even then was mind blowing. From a Big Data/Data storage angle think not of the clunky hard or disk or flash drives we are all familiar with. Rather think at the subatomic level in terms of storing data - all data, or as one of the techs said to us "everything currently know-able by the human race" and contained in all physical and electronic libraries and labs in the world. And then consider storing and retrieving all of it on a molecular scale, with data stored on electrons moving around a nucleus. Now imagine where they have taken that concept (and others like it) in the last 15 years or where it will evolve to in another 25.....



#7 spanky123

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 12:15 PM

Small footprint or not, $30 buys every detail of your life from addresses, phone numbers, email addresses, social media activity, marriage/divorce, criminal records, etc, etc

 

All perfectly legal.


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#8 Nparker

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Posted 22 January 2015 - 12:55 PM

I sometimes think the sooner we "mushroom cloud" ourselves back to the stone age the better. Maybe the smattering of humanity that remains can get it right next time (doubtful, but there is always hope).



#9 Bingo

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Posted 06 March 2015 - 01:32 PM

 Act lets agents search cellphones

In a statement to CBC News, a spokeswoman for the border agency said that the Customs Act authorizes officers to examine "all goods and conveyances including electronic devices, such as cellphones and laptops."

When it comes to items like cellphones, the Supreme Court recently ruled that police can search the devices of people they arrest. But the court also recognized that those devices are different from other items, meaning the searches must be conducted under very narrow circumstances, and the search must relate directly to the arrest.

The case of Alain Philippon, a Quebec man who was charged for refusing to give up his smartphone password at the Halifax airport, illustrates the differences in search-and-seizure powers of border agents and police, but may also signal a need to update such laws governing officials at the border. 

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...2983841?cmp=rss

 



#10 sebberry

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 09:25 AM

Canadian police get cell-site data to text thousands near murder scene
Texting, police say, "is an evolution" of old-school, door-to-door canvassing.
 
The Ontario Provincial Police in Canada are planning to text about 7,500 mobile phones that were in the area where the body of a murdered man was discovered in December—all in a bid to find somebody who may have information about the crime.
 
Welcome to the modern, digital-age version of door-to-door police canvassing.
 
According to local media, the authorities obtained a court order that does not include the names or any other identifying information of mobile phone users whose devices pinged a cell tower near where the body of Frederick "John" Hatch was discovered.
 
[...]

 
http://arstechnica.c...ene/?comments=1


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#11 todd

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 09:55 AM

You are 35,079 times more likely to die from heart disease than from a terrorist attack

You are 33,842 times more likely to die from cancer than from a terrorist attack

You are 23,528 times more likely to die from obesity than from a terrorist attack

You are 5,882 times more likely to die from medical error than terrorism.

You are  4,706 times more likely to drink yourself to death than die from terrorism.

You are 1,904 times more likely to die from a car accident than from a terrorist attack.

You are 2,059 times more likely to kill yourself than die at the hand of a terrorist.

You are 452 times more likely to die from risky sexual behavior than terrorism.

You are 353 times more likely to fall to your death doing something idiotic than die in a terrorist attack.

You are 271 times more likely to die from a workplace accident than terrorism.

You are more than 9 times more likely to be killed by a law enforcement officer than by a terrorist.

You are 110 times more likely to die from contaminated food than terrorism.

 

 

http://www.theburnin...ongering-works/

 

What's the chances of being blown up by a another country with nuclear bomb before I die a natural death?



#12 http

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 12:52 PM

What's the chances of being blown up by a another country with nuclear bomb before I die a natural death?

 

if canada ever charges americans proper market rates for water or electricity, 100%


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#13 Greg

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 09:34 PM

if canada ever charges americans proper market rates for water or electricity, 100%

To be fair, what we save on defense spending by having them as neighbors probably offsets most of those costs...



#14 lanforod

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Posted 30 October 2016 - 09:07 AM

if canada ever charges americans proper market rates for water or electricity, 100%

 

We can charge them full price as soon as Trump dumps NAFTA.



#15 Bingo

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Posted 09 October 2017 - 10:44 AM

We need more cameras, after all everyone else has a camera why not the police.

 

WATCH: VicPD installed CCTV cameras for the Goodlife Marathon. While some appreciate the extra security, others are worried about privacy. Isabelle Raghem reports. 

https://www.cheknews...arathon-374812/

 



#16 Bingo

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Posted 09 October 2017 - 10:54 AM

Security is already everywhere at the legislature.

 

20160920_083740.jpg

 

Security cameras.jpg



#17 sebberry

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Posted 09 October 2017 - 03:57 PM

You just made it onto a list of potential terror suspects by photographing those cameras, Bingo.

 

I just made it onto a list of terror suspects by using the word terror. 


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#18 AllseeingEye

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Posted 09 October 2017 - 05:16 PM

You just made it onto a list of potential terror suspects by photographing those cameras, Bingo.

 

I just made it onto a list of terror suspects by using the word terror. 

Yup....ECHELON has you dialed in now for sure Seb....


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#19 rjag

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Posted 09 October 2017 - 05:53 PM

Yup....ECHELON has you dialed in now for sure Seb....

I thought Carnivore was the newer one?



#20 Bingo

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Posted 09 October 2017 - 06:42 PM

I thought Carnivore was the newer one?

 

And don't ever say Hi, to your friend Jack in an airport.


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