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Woodframed buildings in British Columbia


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#1 amor de cosmos

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Posted 09 October 2015 - 09:07 AM

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Acton Ostry Architects have released renderings of Brock Commons Phase 1, a 404-bed student residence at the University of British Columbia. When completed, the $51.5-million residence building will stand 53 metres tall, making it among the tallest mass timber buildings in the world.

The use of a hybrid mass wood and concrete structure was investigated to demonstrate the applicability of wood in BC’s development and construction industries. Rigorous analysis concluded that the cost of a mass timber structure was similar to that for a typical concrete or steel structure. “Advances in wood technology and manufacturing make tall wood buildings not only possible but also safe and cost effective, while providing a way to lessen the carbon footprint of the built environment,” explain the architects in a press release.

The structure is comprised of a one storey concrete podium and two concrete cores that support 17 storeys of mass timber and concrete structure. Vertical loads are carried by the timber structure while the two concrete cores provide lateral stability. The floor structure is comprised of 5-ply CLT panels that are point-supported on glulam columns on a 2.85m x 4.0m grid. This results in the CLT panels acting as a two-way slab diaphragm.

The structural concept is similar to that of a concrete flat plate slab. To avoid a vertical load transfer through the CLT panels, a steel connector allows for a direct load transfer between the columns and also provides a bearing surface for the CLT panels.

The CLT panels and glulam beams are encapsulated with gypsum board to achieve the required fire resistance rating. The roof is made up of prefabricated sections of steel beams and metal deck with the roofing membrane pre-applied to achieve quick watertightness during construction.

https://www.canadian...ngs/1003729440/

Edited by amor de cosmos, 09 October 2015 - 09:09 AM.

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#2 jonny

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Posted 09 October 2015 - 09:22 AM

It's a wooden View Towers!


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#3 sebberry

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Posted 09 October 2015 - 02:24 PM

It would be interesting to see what the earthquake simulations look like for this.


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#4 amor de cosmos

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Posted 09 October 2015 - 03:18 PM

It's a wooden View Towers!

campus plan says it has to be international style

It would be interesting to see what the earthquake simulations look like for this.

being wood, it might be more flexible, which could make it more earthquake-proof. i don't know that for sure but it might help being wood.

#5 Nparker

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Posted 09 October 2015 - 04:10 PM

It's a wooden View Towers!

To be fair it is just student housing. I don't suppose glamour is really all that important in this sort of structure.



#6 sebberry

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Posted 09 October 2015 - 05:42 PM

being wood, it might be more flexible, which could make it more earthquake-proof. i don't know that for sure but it might help being wood.

 

It probably wood... er... would be better in a quake.  The simulation would sure be entertaining to watch though.


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#7 LJ

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Posted 09 October 2015 - 07:10 PM

^I wouldn't want to be on the 18th floor during an event, you would get whipsawed pretty good I expect.


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#8 James Bay walker

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Posted 14 October 2015 - 06:00 PM

quote name="LJ" post="279917" timestamp="1444446611"]

^I wouldn't want to be on the 18th floor during an event, you would get whipsawed pretty good I expect.[/quote]
Sure but hey, for thrill seeking students that might be the big selling point for the upper floors.

I wonder how well noise insulated it is between floors / walls? Hope they at least put carpeting/underpad on the floors. jbw

#9 Daveyboy

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Posted 14 October 2015 - 06:30 PM

How about a fire in an 18th floor unit? Or on the 5th floor?  My kids wouldn't be living in such a structure....



#10 LJ

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Posted 14 October 2015 - 06:46 PM

It would all be sprinklered, so minimum danger.


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#11 nagel

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Posted 15 October 2015 - 07:44 AM

http://www.treehugge...nstruction.html



#12 James Bay walker

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Posted 15 October 2015 - 08:43 AM

 

They make the point that wood's one of the few renewable construction materials, but I'd of thought:  glass, steel and concrete were fully recyclable.  Is no one reusing all of those? 

 

Sprinklers in the units and common hallways would certainly seem essential (and I think sprinklers are becoming or about to become de rigeur in all highrises, buidling code wise). 

 

I'd like to see prohibitions on smokers visiting or occupying any highrises lacking sprinklers.  I wonder how many lives such a step would save each year from fire/smoke fatalities?

 

jbw



#13 nagel

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Posted 15 October 2015 - 08:58 AM

They make the point that wood's one of the few renewable construction materials, but I'd of thought:  glass, steel and concrete were fully recyclable.  Is no one reusing all of those? 

 

Sprinklers in the units and common hallways would certainly seem essential (and I think sprinklers are becoming or about to become de rigeur in all highrises, buidling code wise). 

 

I'd like to see prohibitions on smokers visiting or occupying any highrises lacking sprinklers.  I wonder how many lives such a step would save each year from fire/smoke fatalities?

 

jbw

AFAIK we have essentially zero recycling of window glass here.  The only recycling would be where specific pieces are repurposed by certain businesses like the Glass Smith on Tennyson.



#14 phx

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Posted 15 October 2015 - 07:15 PM

They make the point that wood's one of the few renewable construction materials, but I'd of thought:  glass, steel and concrete were fully recyclable.  Is no one reusing all of those? 

 

Concrete isn't practical to recycle.  Steel is, though,



#15 James Bay walker

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Posted 16 October 2015 - 12:10 PM

Concrete isn't practical to recycle.  Steel is, though,

Oh?  That's news to me.  http://www.cement.or...led-aggregates 

 

After removal of contaminants through selective demolition, screening, and /or air separation and size reduction in a crusher to aggregate sizes, crushed concrete can be used as: new concrete for pavements, shoulders, median barriers, sidewalks, curbs and gutters, and bridge foundations structural grade concrete soil-cement pavement bases lean-concrete or econo-crete bases and bituminous concrete.

 

eg. I think the preferred approach when replacing a concrete structure, is to grind it up into gravel and use that towards forming the new structure's concrete.  Newer is almost always (much) larger, so using up all the old structure on site becomes easy.

 

jbw


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#16 phx

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Posted 16 October 2015 - 09:25 PM

Oh?  That's news to me.  http://www.cement.or...led-aggregates 

 

I knew someone would say it can be recycled.  It's debatable whether making it into new concrete counts as recycling, as you're not saving much.

 

And before someone starts, no, I'm not actually interested in debating it.



#17 nagel

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Posted 16 October 2015 - 09:41 PM

I knew someone would say it can be recycled.  It's debatable whether making it into new concrete counts as recycling, as you're not saving much.

 

And before someone starts, no, I'm not actually interested in debating it.

Sort of like how K cups are now being burned to make concrete.  If it helps you sleep at night to consider that as recycling, go for it. 



#18 amor de cosmos

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Posted 18 May 2016 - 08:35 AM

update
http://www.archdaily...ay-in-vancouver

there might be a much taller one in london someday
http://www.dezeen.co...raper-barbican/
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#19 amor de cosmos

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Posted 19 July 2016 - 10:44 AM

Construction of UBC Brock Commons, a record-breaking 18-storey mass timber development at the University of British Columbia, is well underway.

Acton Ostry Architects released renderings of the $51.5-million student residence last October. While it was predicted that the mass timber structure would be erected at a rate of one floor per week, construction forecasts have been far outdone. The current rate of construction is one floor every three days, and is only expected to increase.

Structurlam Products LP, the provider of the mass timber package for the project, has manufactured the key building components — cross-laminated timber panels (Crosslam CLT) and glue-laminated columns (Glulam). Record-breaking construction is thanks to the fact that Structurlam products are manufactured to 1 mm of accuracy, allowing for expedited construction and quick installation. The lumber for UBC Brock Commons has been sourced exclusively from British Columbia’s second-growth forests through locally-based lumber partners Interfor, Canfor and West Fraser.

https://www.canadian...wer/1003734324/

Edited by amor de cosmos, 19 July 2016 - 10:45 AM.

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#20 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 01 September 2016 - 07:14 PM

http://dailyhive.com...u-ban-vancouver

 

Japanese architect to build world's tallest hybrid timber building in Coal Harbour

 

 

20 units?

 

Totalling 54,503 square feet of floor area, the 223-foot-tall (68 metres) building will have 20 residential units, retail space on the ground floor, and three levels of underground parking accessible from West Hastings Street.

 

The first 12 floors of the building will be constructed using traditional concrete and steel methods with balconies and the concrete facade aligned with the levels of the adjacent Evergreen Building designed by the late Arthur Erickson. The proponents have also contracted Cornelia Hahn Oberlander, the original landscape architect for the Evergreen Building, to mirror the landscaping work on the proposed building.

 


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