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Woodframed buildings in British Columbia


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#41 Nparker

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 08:55 PM

"To take Canada from hewers of wood to fabricators of high-tech tall timber buildings –that’s the promise of a new building proposed by Toronto’s George Brown College.".

I am not entirely sure I like it, but it certainly appears to be taking wood timber construction to a whole new level.

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wood.JPG



#42 amor de cosmos

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Posted 02 April 2018 - 06:11 AM

they all look pretty awful

#43 Jackerbie

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Posted 03 April 2018 - 07:42 AM

Meanwhile, a forestry company in Japan is proposing the tallest building in the country, at 350 m, also made of hybrid timber construction https://www.dezeen.c...re-tokyo-japan/

 

tallest-timber-tower-tokyo-japan-dezeen-



#44 Jackerbie

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 11:56 AM

Is there a general topic for BC Building Code or wood frame construction? Sounds like the limit is being increased from 6 storeys to 12, provided that there is a concrete base and core. via https://globalnews.c...ers-12-storeys/



#45 LeoVictoria

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 12:12 PM

Is there a general topic for BC Building Code or wood frame construction? Sounds like the limit is being increased from 6 storeys to 12, provided that there is a concrete base and core. via https://globalnews.c...ers-12-storeys/

 

Super cool.  Mass timber construction is going to be huge.


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#46 Nparker

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 12:16 PM

Super cool.  Mass timber construction is going to be huge.

And apparently quite ugly.



#47 Mike K.

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 12:21 PM

Some food for thought:

Can you elaborate more on the transition between 'soft' and 'hard' markets, and how that relates to construction?
The hardening market will be felt more acutely in certain industries than others, in part because those industries have experienced falling rates for several years and diminishing profitability. In terms of construction, many insurance companies are scaling back the amount of wood frame risk they are willing to underwrite due to fire exposure. This means that larger wood frame projects are likely to experience higher premiums, deductibles and tighter warranties or conditions. - https://victoria.cit...on-fitzpatrick/

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#48 Jackerbie

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 12:52 PM

And apparently quite ugly.

 

The architecture and design of a building can be ugly regardless of the material. Brock Commons is modular mass timber. View Towers is concrete. They both took the same form, despite different materials and construction methods.

 

Here's a 12 story mass timber building proposed for Portland, which looks no different from your "ordinary" tower, albeit with less seafoam spandrel:

 

Screen%20Shot%202018-07-23%20at%204.02.0



#49 Nparker

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 01:04 PM

The architecture and design of a building can be ugly regardless of the material...

 

While that is certainly true, I would imagine the CoV (and environs) is unlikely to see any large timber construction that showcases innovative usage. Of course since Victoria tends to get dull designs regardless of material/method I suppose it doesn't really matter.



#50 Nparker

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 01:08 PM

Can anyone imagine these getting approved locally?

timber1.JPG

timber2.JPG



#51 LeoVictoria

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Posted 13 March 2019 - 01:38 PM

Some food for thought:

Can you elaborate more on the transition between 'soft' and 'hard' markets, and how that relates to construction?
The hardening market will be felt more acutely in certain industries than others, in part because those industries have experienced falling rates for several years and diminishing profitability. In terms of construction, many insurance companies are scaling back the amount of wood frame risk they are willing to underwrite due to fire exposure. This means that larger wood frame projects are likely to experience higher premiums, deductibles and tighter warranties or conditions. - https://victoria.cit...on-fitzpatrick/


Wood frame is different than mass timber and has very different fire characteristics. Not sure if the insurance industry has caught up with that yet though.
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