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The Tragically Hip


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#21 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 07:44 AM

It will become one of CBC's historical events. I'm not a fan but watched anyways and found his energy or lack thereof riveting

 

Ya, I'll be interested to know the viewership numbers.

 

I was at the Yates Taphouse and they had to turn away the first people at 3:15pm.  It was already full.

 

I'd also be curious to find out how much the CBC (us taxpayers) paid for the rights.  There was no commercials, so it's not as if it paid for itself in any way.   The production value was very good, I give CBC credit for that.


<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#22 Rob Randall

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 08:53 AM

Most popular article on NewYorker.com right now:

"Canada’s heroes are consumed by their country: Atanarjuat, the fast runner of Inuit legend, who ran naked through the snow; Tom Thomson, the country’s greatest painter, drowned on Canoe Lake in Algonquin Park, in the middle of the landscapes he was trying to capture; the North-West Mounted Police, whose horses collapsed from exhaustion in the Great March West; John Franklin, who froze to death in the Northwest Passage. The great Canadian icon of my childhood was Terry Fox, who ran the length of a marathon a day, trying to cross Canada on a prosthetic leg while dying of osteosarcoma, in order to raise money for cancer research. Gord Downie has entered the iconography of the Northern survivor. He has proved his endurance by crossing an impossible country while dying."

http://www.newyorker...ramatic-goodbye

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#23 LeoVictoria

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 01:17 PM

Whatever the CBC paid, it was worth 10 times that. Brought Canadians together all over the country.

#24 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 01:20 PM

Whatever the CBC paid, it was worth 10 times that. Brought Canadians together all over the country.

 

Ya, I can agree with that, I guess.  Except that maybe CTV could have got it, and got it without a dime of our tax money.


<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#25 Bingo

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 01:36 PM

Ya, I can agree with that, I guess.  Except that maybe CTV could have got it, and got it without a dime of our tax money.

 But then CBC would have been showing Olympics on 8 channels. This way they captured a larger audience.



#26 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 06:19 PM

Ya, I'll be interested to know the viewership numbers.

 

According to the CBC, 11.7 million people — a third of the country — watched the broadcast.

 

 

http://www.cheknews....lly-hip-209844/

 

 

The most watched television broadcast in Canadian history was the Gold medal game of the men's hockey tournament at the 2010 Winter Olympics, played between the United States and Canada at General Motors Place (renamed "Canada Hockey Place" for the Olympics) in Vancouver. A confirmed 16.6 million Canadians watched the whole game, roughly one-half of the country's entire population.[28] A groundbreaking 26.5 million Canadians watched some part of the game, over 80 percent of the country's 34-million-person population.[29] According to multiple sources, 13.3 million Canadians watched the Opening Ceremonies of the Vancouver 2010 Olympics, which was the previous record.[30]

Many believed the final game of the 1972 Summit Series had up to 18 million viewers, but this was not so; only 4.3 million people watched it. 10.3 million people watched the ice hockey gold medal final of the 2002 Winter Olympics

 

 

https://en.wikipedia...oadcasts#Canada


<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#27 LeoVictoria

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 06:32 PM

Ya, I can agree with that, I guess. Except that maybe CTV could have got it, and got it without a dime of our tax money.


And ruined it wIth commercial breaks. No thanks
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#28 LJ

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 06:54 PM

I got enough of it from the newscasts. When I got the news push that "Gord Downie had terminal brain cancer" I had to google it to see who he was.


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#29 AllseeingEye

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 08:07 PM

Was reading an article a few months back just after Downie announced his brain cancer prognosis, which made the rather interesting point that the main reason the Hip never really broke through into the international - read American - market was the unfortunate (for them) timing of their initial breakout success, which roughly coincided with the emergence of the seminal Seattle Grunge movement. 

 

Consider when the T-H began to make real headway in this country who the big and emerging big bands of the day were - super-groups U2 and Guns 'n Roses, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden, Alice in Chains.....some of the biggest rock acts on the planet in the last 40 years. I saw GnR, Nirvana and Pearl Jam in their prime and it is easy in retrospect to see why a band from some place called Kingston singing about hockey, the prairies and long dead Toronto Maple Leaf players named Bill Barilko - subjects which resonated naturally to many Canadians - probably wouldn't make much impact on fans in London, Tokyo, Miami or LA.



#30 Rob Randall

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Posted 21 August 2016 - 08:10 PM

Victorians watching live in Banff:

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"[Randall's] aesthetic poll was more accurate than his political acumen"

-Tom Hawthorne, Toronto Globe and Mail


#31 Mike K.

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 06:11 AM

Kids these days.

Anyways, I recall an interview on MuchMusic from back in the day when Downey was asked how much being Camadian meant to the band. Downey said he didn't much care for his heritage, he was where he was and his music simply resonated with what he knew.

I always thought that was a bit lame of him to have said that.

Anyways, a long time VV member who has since moved to another town has a great story of walking into a small bar in LA only to find the Canadian members of the LA Kings sitting at the stage watching the Hip perform an acoustic set.

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#32 Jables

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 11:58 AM

Anyways, I recall an interview on MuchMusic from back in the day when Downey was asked how much being Camadian meant to the band. Downey said he didn't much care for his heritage, he was where he was and his music simply resonated with what he knew.

I always thought that was a bit lame of him to have said that.

 

This isn't surprising to me and it doesn't upset me at all.  Many musicians tend to write about what they know and/or care for and people will react to it in their own way.

 

In a sense, it's that reaction that has given them their uniquely Canadian identity - even if the band itself wasn't necessarily intending this to be the case.  It's just how the cookie crumbled.



#33 jonny

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 12:05 PM

It’s funny how when an artist dies, or as in this case is going to die, they can go from a decent, but relatively obscure and niche-y entertainer, to the embodiment of what it means to be Canadian, living icons, etc. etc. It’s kind of nauseating.

 

They were a pretty obscure group but now everybody’s a fan, apparently.


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#34 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 12:13 PM

I could not tell you what the Red Hot Chili Peppers sing about.  I really don't pay much attention to lyrics.  Tragically Hip's, or anyone else's.


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<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#35 tedward

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 12:49 PM

They were a pretty obscure group but now everybody’s a fan, apparently.

 

Never was, still not, and apparently that makes me a "lesser" Canadian according to all the hype.


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#36 Dietrich

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 01:48 PM

I was starting to think I was the only one that wasn't a fan - in my peer group at least. How un-Canadian of me it seemed. Whatever.


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#37 Dr.Doinglittle

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 02:08 PM

Ron McLean called Downie Canada's Shakespeare just as they went to the live feed... which I thought was a bit much.

 

I always thought of them more as a central Canadian phenomenon - although they certainly had a fanbase out here.


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#38 LeoVictoria

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 02:43 PM

It’s funny how when an artist dies, or as in this case is going to die, they can go from a decent, but relatively obscure and niche-y entertainer, to the embodiment of what it means to be Canadian, living icons, etc. etc. It’s kind of nauseating.

They were a pretty obscure group but now everybody’s a fan, apparently.


Maybe it's a generational thing. Certainly not an obscure group when I was growing up. Given that a third of the country tuned in to the show i suppose they're not that obscure.

#39 Rob Randall

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 06:26 PM

...

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Edited by Rob Randall, 22 August 2016 - 06:27 PM.

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"[Randall's] aesthetic poll was more accurate than his political acumen"

-Tom Hawthorne, Toronto Globe and Mail


#40 Bingo

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Posted 22 August 2016 - 06:29 PM

It’s funny how when an artist dies, or as in this case is going to die, they can go from a decent, but relatively obscure and niche-y entertainer, to the embodiment of what it means to be Canadian, living icons, etc. etc. 

It’s kind of nauseating. They were a pretty obscure group but now everybody’s a fan, apparently.

 

I don't think the Hip's music had much to do with the concert, as the musicians are mediocre as far as talent goes.

It was more about having a chance to see someone perform last rites on themselves, and for the audience who took the opportunity to question and touch base with their own mortality.

I was to a fan and still not, but I got the message 


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