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Lost Nukes


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#1 todd

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Posted 04 November 2016 - 11:35 PM

By George Baker, Andrew Kurjata, CBC News Posted: Nov 04, 2016 5:30 AM PT

Lost Cold War nuclear weapon? Canada's navy to investigate object found off B.C. coast

 

The Royal Canadian Navy is sending a ship to determine if a diver has discovered "the lost nuke" — a Mark IV bomb that went missing after a U.S. bomber crashed off B.C.'s North Coast in the early days of the Cold War.....
 
........................
 
........"Just before midnight on February 13, 1950, three engines of a US Air Force B-36 intercontinental bomber caught fire over Canada's northwest coast.The crew jumped, and the plane ditched somewhere in the Pacific Ocean. Almost four years later, the wreck of the bomber was found accidentally in a remote location in the coastal mountains of British Columbia, three hours' flying time in the opposite direction of where it was supposed to have crashed.
 
"After years of silence, the United States finally admitted to losing its very first nuclear bomb; the incident was its first Broken Arrow, the code name for accidents involving nuclear weapons. But was the bomb dropped and exploded over the Inside Passage, or was it blown up at the aircraft's resting place in the mountains?".......
 
.............

 

 

 

The plane carried a Mark IV atomic bomb, containing a substantial quantity of natural uranium and 5,000 pounds (2,300 kg) of conventional explosives https://en.wikipedia...mbia_B-36_crash

 

Mk4_Fat_Man_bomb.jpg



#2 Bingo

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Posted 05 November 2016 - 05:46 AM

The bomber crashed north of Smithers. Here is some of the armament at the museum in Smithers.

 

IMG_4946.JPG

 

 

Map of the probable route of the bomber.

 

IMG_4948.JPG

 

 

 

 



#3 Rob Randall

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Posted 05 November 2016 - 09:06 AM

Just to clarify, it was a test bomb with a lead core so it wouldn't have detonated like the Hiroshima bomb, more like a dirty bomb, but still...

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#4 Bingo

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Posted 05 November 2016 - 09:24 AM

Just to clarify, it was a test bomb with a lead core so it wouldn't have detonated like the Hiroshima bomb, more like a dirty bomb, but still...

 

It could have done a lot of damage if it hit the hospital in Prince Rupert, so the crew did the right thing dropping it into the ocean.



#5 todd

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Posted 05 November 2016 - 11:48 AM

Just to clarify, it was a test bomb with a lead core so it wouldn't have detonated like the Hiroshima bomb, more like a dirty bomb, but still...

 

 

"After years of silence, the United States finally admitted to losing its very first nuclear bomb; the incident was its first Broken Arrow, the code name for accidents involving nuclear weapons. But was the bomb dropped and exploded over the Inside Passage, or was it blown up at the aircraft's resting place in the mountains?".......

 
.............

 

That's the story.



#6 Bingo

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Posted 05 November 2016 - 12:42 PM

That's the story.

 

I have Norman Leach's book Broken Arrow - America's First LOST Nuclear Weapon.

 

The whole story is in there. Because the cold war was on at the time, the incident and the crash north of Smithers was covered up.

The US Air Force sent in their team to bring out the wreckage and nobody knew about it. Later on the Canadians went in and found no trace of radioactivity.

The recent find underwater near Haida Gwaii might be the unexploded bomb but time will tell if it is.

I don't believe the crew would have exploded it over the water as it would have been heard or seen by vessels in the area.

The HMCS Cayuga, which was based out of Victoria helped with the rescue of the crew which had bailed out.

Other crewmen were rescued by a fish packer the Cape Perry and taken to Port Hardy, and later flown out by a Canso to McCord Air Force Base in Washington State 

In spite of the media presence all of this was hushed up at the time.

The crash occurred on Valentine's Day 1950.

 

The bomb was not exploded, and that's part of an interesting story.



#7 todd

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Posted 06 November 2016 - 10:21 AM

 

.......The navy plans to dispatch HMCS Yellowknife, a coastal defence vessel, around the third week of November to conduct an investigation. .........

..............

......Read more at: http://www.vanguardn...ear-bomb-found/

 

Taking their time. Bet the US will could do this a lot faster.


Edited by todd, 06 November 2016 - 10:21 AM.


#8 Bingo

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Posted 06 November 2016 - 10:26 AM

Taking their time. Bet the US will could do this a lot faster.

 

I think the US would have searched the area a long time ago if there was anything to be found.



#9 todd

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Posted 06 November 2016 - 10:43 AM

I think the US would have searched the area a long time ago if there was anything to be found.

 

Maybe didn't have time a lot of problems around that time. 

 

 

December 5, 1965. An A-4E Skyhawk attack aircraft carrying a 1-megaton thermonuclear weapon (hydrogen bomb) rolled off the deck of the U.S.S. Ticonderoga and fell into the Pacific Ocean. The plane and weapon sank in 16,000 feet of water and were never found. 15 years later the U.S. Navy finally admitted that the accident had taken place, claiming it happened 500 miles from land the in relative safety of the high seas. This turned out to be not true; it actually happened about 80 miles off Japan's Ryuku island chain, as the aircraft carrier was sailing to Yokosuka, Japan after a bombing mission over Vietnam.

These revelations caused a political uproar in Japan, which prohibits the United States from bringing nuclear weapons into its territory.

and more: http://mentalfloss.c...ons-us-has-lost


Edited by todd, 06 November 2016 - 10:44 AM.


#10 Bingo

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Posted 06 November 2016 - 10:51 AM

I don't for one minute believe that planes over Vietnam were carrying thermonuclear weapons. Any comment here ASE?



#11 todd

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Posted 06 November 2016 - 10:56 AM

Wouldn't doubt they had one on the aircraft carrier however.


Edited by todd, 06 November 2016 - 11:01 AM.


#12 todd

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Posted 06 November 2016 - 11:04 AM

So is it finders keepers? If it is a nuke will Canada be a nuclear power?


Edited by todd, 06 November 2016 - 11:04 AM.


#13 Bingo

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Posted 06 November 2016 - 11:06 AM

Wouldn't doubt they had one on the aircraft carrier however.

 

But not on an aircraft waiting to roll off the deck as the story goes.



#14 todd

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Posted 06 November 2016 - 11:24 AM

But not on an aircraft waiting to roll off the deck as the story goes.

 

May have had it loaded and ready to go, nuclear war waits for nobody. ASE?


Edited by todd, 06 November 2016 - 11:24 AM.


#15 todd

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Posted 07 November 2016 - 10:38 AM

 

September 25, 1959

 

Makes our sewage look not so bad.


Edited by todd, 07 November 2016 - 10:49 AM.


#16 AllseeingEye

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Posted 09 November 2016 - 09:45 AM

As everyone knows it has long been US policy not to divulge whether their ships or planes are carrying nuclear weapons; I am unaware of any instances where USAF aircraft actually specifically  carried nukes into combat in the Vietnam War. Multiple aircraft types were nuclear-capable of course including the B-52's, the A-3 Skywarrior, A-5 Vigilante and the F-4 Phantom among others.

 

Although some of the carrier-based aircraft may well have been armed and equipped with nukes while cruising offshore on their carrier I doubt for political and strategic reasons nuclear weapons were actually carried into combat ops for various reasons - fear of losing one in the event the plane was shot down, fear of an escalated conflict with China or the Soviets in the event it was actually used, and also knowledge that the US homeland was not actually threatened even in the event the North prevailed in the war which as we all know it ultimately did. So.....'doubtful' IMO.


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#17 Bingo

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Posted 25 November 2016 - 04:08 PM

NO NUKE

 

The Royal Canadian Navy confirmed today that a mysterious object found off the coast of B.C.'s North Coast is not a bomb or a lost nuclear weapon.

The navy was deployed at the request of RCMP to investigate the area near Haida Gwaii after diver Sean Smyrichinsky found a suspicious object during a diving trip near Banks Island.

In a statement, the navy said the object is "a metal part of a larger machine assembly and appears to be a piece of industrial equipment."

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...-bomb-1.3868632

 



#18 Bingo

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Posted 25 November 2016 - 04:10 PM

And there will be those who say it's a cover up, but it won't be me that says that.



#19 todd

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Posted 25 November 2016 - 04:25 PM

And there will be those who say it's a cover up, but it won't be me that says that.

Never say never.



#20 AllseeingEye

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Posted 25 November 2016 - 07:27 PM

Well rest assured I don't have it....


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