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Danbrook One
Uses: rental, commercial
Address: 2762-2768 Claude Road
Municipality: Langford
Region: West Shore
Storeys: 11
Danbrook One is an 11-storey, 90-unit residential complex with ground floor commercial space in the 2700-block... (view full profile)
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[Langford] Danbrook One | 11-storeys | Rentals, commercial | Built - completed in 2019


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#261 Mike K.

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Posted 19 October 2020 - 03:42 PM

Overlap would be a sharing of duties, wouldn’t it?

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#262 Rob Randall

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    C'mon man, cut out the malarkey

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Posted 19 October 2020 - 03:45 PM

^Not really. I'm thinking there's usually someone in the architect's office with some structural engineering background so that the overall design is good before it gets sent off to the professional engineer's office who really gets into the nitty gritty.

 

I was thinking of the Johnson Street Bridge as an example: conjured up by a designer but the engineers had to struggle to make it functional because more thought was put in to how it looked rather than how it worked.

 

Doesn't an architect have a little bit more technical know-how that would make the engineer's job easier?


Edited by Rob Randall, 19 October 2020 - 03:46 PM.

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#263 Mattjvd

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Posted 22 October 2020 - 11:00 AM

Architecture in BC is a Masters-level professional degree, with Engineering strongly recommended as the undergraduate. I'd imagine most architects are also civil engineers.


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#264 Jackerbie

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Posted 22 October 2020 - 11:22 AM

Architecture in BC is a Masters-level professional degree, with Engineering strongly recommended as the undergraduate. I'd imagine most architects are also civil engineers.

 

Engineers are very much the minority among registered architects. Most come from a design background, as architecture is usually offered at both the undergrad and graduate level.


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#265 TallGuy

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Posted 22 October 2020 - 03:40 PM

^Not really. I'm thinking there's usually someone in the architect's office with some structural engineering background so that the overall design is good before it gets sent off to the professional engineer's office who really gets into the nitty gritty.

 

I was thinking of the Johnson Street Bridge as an example: conjured up by a designer but the engineers had to struggle to make it functional because more thought was put in to how it looked rather than how it worked.

 

Doesn't an architect have a little bit more technical know-how that would make the engineer's job easier?

No. Professionals are expected to "stay in their lane." Reviewing and approving of work in a discipline they are not fully qualified in opens up liability.

 

Architecture in BC is a Masters-level professional degree, with Engineering strongly recommended as the undergraduate. I'd imagine most architects are also civil engineers.

No. My experience was that your could switch to architecture after two years of engineering. Two years of engineering wouldn't make you an engineer. Technically, you can't refer to yourself as an engineer unless you are a registered professional engineer, even if you have completed your undergrad.


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#266 Mattjvd

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Posted 22 October 2020 - 07:18 PM

No. Professionals are expected to "stay in their lane." Reviewing and approving of work in a discipline they are not fully qualified in opens up liability.

No. My experience was that your could switch to architecture after two years of engineering. Two years of engineering wouldn't make you an engineer. Technically, you can't refer to yourself as an engineer unless you are a registered professional engineer, even if you have completed your undergrad.


Huh, the more you know. I thought it was strictly a grad degree.

#267 MarkoJ

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 12:41 AM

Architecture in BC is a Masters-level professional degree, with Engineering strongly recommended as the undergraduate. I'd imagine most architects are also civil engineers.

 

I've met  more architects with undergrad arts degrees than engineering. Actually I can't think of any I've come across that are civil engineer undergrads. 


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#268 Mike K.

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 07:35 AM

D’Ambrosio offers engineering in-house. At least I know they did engineering for Esquimalt Town Square.

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#269 jasmineshinga

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 02:07 PM

I'm thinking there's usually someone in the architect's office with some structural engineering background so that the overall design is good before it gets sent off to the professional engineer's office who really gets into the nitty gritty.

 

I was thinking of the Johnson Street Bridge as an example: conjured up by a designer but the engineers had to struggle to make it functional because more thought was put in to how it looked rather than how it worked.

 

Doesn't an architect have a little bit more technical know-how that would make the engineer's job easier?

Not really. We can copy stuff that worked before, such as typical column spacing in parkades, but we are fully expecting it to be thrown out by an engineer and our design must flex to suit. We don't do the loading math, we have little say on the structure unless it massively impacts the design - in which case we begin the long task of getting an engineer to try something different.


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#270 jasmineshinga

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 02:09 PM

I've met  more architects with undergrad arts degrees than engineering. Actually I can't think of any I've come across that are civil engineer undergrads. 

Heck, an Architect doesn't even need a formal education, one can register and practice through AIBC if you've been working long enough and another Architect endorses your skill.


~ Jasmine ~


 



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