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Crisis in Qatar


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#1 Bingo

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 06:39 AM

BEIRUT, Lebanon — EgyptSaudi Arabia and three other Arab countries severed all ties with Qatar early Monday,

in a renewal of a four-year effort to isolate it and a sign of a new boldness after a visit to the region by President Trump.

The five Arab states not only suspended diplomatic relations, as they have in the past, but also cut off land, air and sea travel to and from Qatar and ordered their citizens to leave the country.

Qatar, like other monarchies in the Persian Gulf, is a close ally of Washington, and it hosts a major American military base that commands the United States-led air campaign against the Islamic State.

https://www.nytimes....rates.html?_r=0

 



#2 Bingo

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 06:49 AM

 

The US Combined Air Operations Center (CAOC) at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar, provides command and control of air power throughout Iraq, Syria, Afghanistan, and 17 other nations.

The base, which boasts one of the longest runways in the Persian Gulf at 12,500 feet, is a strategically important facility that can accommodate up to 120 aircraft.
In 2016, the base was used as staging ground to fly B-52 airstrikes against ISIS targets in Iraq and Syria. 
Early in the Afghanistan campaign, F-16 fighters and E-8C Joint Stars reconnaissance planes that monitor ground units were based there, along with refueling tankers.
The base houses the forward headquarters of the US Air Force Central Command, Combined Air and Space Operations Center and the 379th Air Expedition Wing.
The Combined Air and Space Operations Center (CAOC) oversees US military air power in Afghanistan, Syria, Iraq and 18 other nations, according to the Air Force.
Manned by personnel from the US Air Force, Army, Navy and Marines as well as coalition partner countries, the CAOC is "the nerve center" of air campaigns across the region, according to the Air Force.

 



#3 catfluff

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 07:50 AM

My wife's cousin works at a Canadian school in Doha (College of North Atlantic - Qatar) and he said this morning that he's stocked up on a months worth of food and water. The supermarket shelves are becoming bare.



#4 lanforod

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 07:53 AM

I'm interested in exactly why the other gulf nations are ticked at Qatar. Qatar seems to be supporting the fight against ISIS fine, so what is the argument about supporting Islamist terrorists groups about?



#5 tedward

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 08:35 AM

My wife's cousin works at a Canadian school in Doha (College of North Atlantic - Qatar) and he said this morning that he's stocked up on a months worth of food and water. The supermarket shelves are becoming bare.

 

What else would you expect when panicked people buy a month's worth of food via a distribution system designed for at most, weekly shopping? Bit of a feedback loop there. ;)


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#6 Rob Randall

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 09:08 AM

Qatar reminds me of a guy going to a hockey game with a Canucks hat, Leafs jersey and Canadiens jacket thinking that will make him the most popular guy at the game when in fact it makes everyone hate him.

 

What I gather is that small but rich and powerful Qatar has been acting as a regional power player for years, trying to broker peace deals and influence policy while also appeasing some of the bad guys in the area. This tangled, overlapping, contradicting web of suspicion among the five or so countries has been simmering for a while so when Trump visited Saudi Arabia to shake hands and cut deals the Saudis felt emboldened enough to join with Egypt and the rest of basket cases to gang up on Qatar for being so bossy and, I don't know--Qatar-ish. Anyway, it's created a big mess.

 

Thing is, Trump's advisors didn't seem to realize the visit would trigger this response.


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#7 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 09:29 AM

^ Ya, it's Trump's fault, of course.


<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#8 Rob Randall

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 09:35 AM

Well, he sure didn't help. You could take the pro-Trump side and say this is a little short-term pain for long term gain. But I doubt Trump's bickering, naive, short-handed team are capable of playing the long game.


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"[Randall's] aesthetic poll was more accurate than his political acumen"

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#9 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 09:54 AM

It's hard to see how Trump could come to Canada, shake a few of the wrong hands, and it would cause Canada and Germany, and Denmark to recall all our citizens from, and end all trade with, say, the UK.  Don't give Trump too much credit.


<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#10 Rob Randall

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 10:05 AM

It's hard to see how Trump could come to Canada, shake a few of the wrong hands, and it would cause Canada and Germany, and Denmark to recall all our citizens from, and end all trade with, say, the UK.  Don't give Trump too much credit.

 

It helps that the countries you name are on pretty good terms, Greenland notwithstanding. 

 

Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, UAE, Libya, Maldives, Yemen and Bahrain on the other hand...they're all double dealing, buying US arms, doling out cash to terrorists, meddling in Syria and Iran and all sorts of destructive nonsense. They've been watching Trump and realized they can screw over little Qatar with no serious repercussions and they were right. 


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#11 Rob Randall

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 02:24 PM

According to the Financial Times, the dispute is even more dangerous and bone-headed than previously assumed.

 

Apparently the Qatari royal family was on a falconry hunting expedition in Iraq (because what else do you do when you're rich and stupid) and got themselves kidnapped by Jihadis. Qatar secured their release with a billion dollar ransom which of course got dispersed throughout the bad-guy world.

 

https://www.ft.com/c...f4-c742b9791d43


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#12 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 02:37 PM

Note that the kidnapping happened in 2015 or very early 2016.  And the release this past April.  So I'm not sure we can know all the facts and figures.

 

 

It is clear now that from the very start, the hunters’ abduction was linked to the civil war in Syria, which has drawn in regional powers in an increasingly complicated proxy war. On one side of the hostage negotiations were Shiite powers — Iran and its Lebanese proxy Hezbollah — which firmly support the Syrian government of Bashar al-Assad. On the other were the Sunni powers Qatar and Turkey, which fund and arm rebel groups trying to take down Mr. Assad’s government.

 

Their release, which involved the payment of millions of dollars in ransom to an Iraqi militia backed by Iran, was tied to a broader deal involving a trading of besieged sectarian populations among four towns in Syria, according to a senior Shiite leader in Iraq who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the subject.

 

The Iraqi Shiite official said the release of the Qatari prisoners was linked to the safe evacuation of — and delivery of humanitarian aid to — residents of two Shiite villages in Idlib Province, Fouaa and Kfarya. They have been under government control but besieged by Sunni Islamist rebel groups backed by Turkey and Qatar.

 

The Syrian deal was negotiated separately before the fate of the hostages became entwined with the talks. As part of that agreement, residents of two predominantly Sunni villages, Madaya and Zabadani, that have been held by rebels but besieged by forces loyal to the Syrian government are to be bused to safety. Many of them, about 2,000 people, have already been evacuated from Madaya.

 

 

 

https://www.nytimes....ri-hunters.html

 

But hey, the West (certainly including Canada) keeps buying oil/gas from these countries, so in the end it's our money that funds all this stuff.

 

 

Bilateral merchandise trade between Canada and Qatar are substantial, but continue to fluctuate. This trend continued in 2012 with total trade decreasing to $373.6 million from $559.5 million in 2011. This downward shift is attributed to a significant decrease in the imports of liquefied natural gas from Qatar, down to $148 million in 2012 from $387 million in 2011. However this product continues to make up 85.8% of Canada's imports from Qatar. Canadian exports to Qatar saw an increase in 2012.

Canada’s reputation is based foremost on the presence of our academic and health institutions, the College of North Atlantic and the University of Calgary’s Nursing Campus being the most noteworthy.  The work accomplished by other health institutions such as SickKids International also speaks forcefully.

Over 7000 Canadian expatriates live and prosper in Qatar, working within existing Canadian and Qatari companies and institutions.  This dynamic community is active in Qatar and serves to advance our mutual interests.

Since June 2011, Qatar Airways offers three weekly direct flights between Montréal and Doha.

 

http://www.canadaint...x.aspx?lang=eng


Edited by VicHockeyFan, 05 June 2017 - 02:50 PM.

<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#13 Mike K.

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 02:52 PM

Doesn't matter.

 

It's still Trump's fault.


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#14 Cassidy

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 03:13 PM

Qatar hates Bahrain, and also hates the Emirates.

The reverse is also true. Their hatred is solidly rooted in history.

It's been bubbling under the apparent civility for decades.

 

It's amazing they ever were members of the same group of countries in the first place.

 

The apparent support the Emir (supposedly) offered to Iran was all that was needed to regurgitate that ancient hatred.

 

As the wealthiest country per capita in the world, I suspect Qatar will manage just fine. 

 

Because these countries are absolute monarchies, it's never about "countries", and more about family squabbles.

 

(as for the kidnapping, it's worth noting that the "Royal Family" in Qatar refers to about 6000 people, so it's not like the Emir's son or daughter were involved ... it could be as nutty as the Emir's 14th cousin 25 times removed).


Edited by Cassidy, 05 June 2017 - 03:20 PM.


#15 Mike K.

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 03:14 PM

So, what you're saying is, Trump?


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#16 Cassidy

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 03:18 PM

So, what you're saying is, Trump?

Why "yes" ... I thought that was obvious!



#17 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 05:14 PM

I bet of those 6,000, at least 40 of them are Trumps.


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<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#18 LJ

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 07:34 PM

I'm interested in exactly why the other gulf nations are ticked at Qatar. Qatar seems to be supporting the fight against ISIS fine, so what is the argument about supporting Islamist terrorists groups about?

They are friends with Iran.


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#19 Rob Randall

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 06:51 AM

Wow, so much for us armchair pundits: Trump has the real truth:

 

So good to see the Saudi Arabia visit with the King and 50 countries already paying off. They said they would take a hard line on funding extremism, and all reference was pointing to Qatar. Perhaps this will be the beginning of the end to the horror of terrorism!

 

 

Does the State Department really think that Qatar is the main source of terror funding and that Saudi Arabia itself is the country responsible for stopping it? And it has nothing to do with the countries' earlier branding of Qatar's Al Jazeera as "hostile media"?


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#20 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 06:57 AM

Why does Qatar fund Al Jazeera?  I do not see many Belguim or Peru or New Zealand media companies that feel they need or have a strong business case to have a global presence.  Not that AJA made any business sense either.


Edited by VicHockeyFan, 06 June 2017 - 07:06 AM.

<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

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