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#121 G-Man

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 11:31 AM

The new Huawei P30 Pro looks pretty good!

Visit my blog at: https://www.sidewalkingvictoria.com 

 

It has a whole new look!

 


#122 Mike K.

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Posted 16 April 2019 - 02:25 PM

My buddy just got rid of his brand new Huawei phone and picked up a brand new iPhone, whatever the heck it is now.

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#123 amor de cosmos

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Posted 17 April 2019 - 01:10 PM

Intel says it is canceling a line of smartphone 5G chips that had been slated for 2020 launches. The announcement comes on the same day Apple announced a wide-ranging settlement with Qualcomm over patent issues.

Qualcomm has long been a dominant player in the wireless chip business for smartphones. Apple worries about becoming too dependent on a single supplier. So in recent years, Apple has encouraged Intel to expand its wireless chip offerings and offered Intel a significant share of its business for 4G chips in the iPhone.

Then last year, as Apple's legal battle with Qualcomm heated up, Intel became Apple's sole supplier for 4G wireless chips in the iPhone. Intel additionally was working to develop 5G chips for Apple to use in future versions of the iPhone. But recent reports have indicated that Intel was "missing deadlines" for the wireless chip that was slated to go into the 2020 model of the iPhone.

Fast Company reported earlier this month that "in order to deliver big numbers of those modems in time for a September 2020 iPhone launch, Intel needs to deliver sample parts to Apple by early summer of this year, and then deliver a finished modem design in early 2020."

If Intel had failed to provide Apple with 5G chips in a timely manner, that would have put Apple in an untenable position. The iPhone's competitors would be able to offer 5G capabilities using Qualcomm chips, while Qualcomm could have denied Apple access to 5G chips as long as the patent battle continued.

https://arstechnica....-with-qualcomm/
 

Chinese telecom tech is invading the physical world, but Europeans and industry have strategies to contain the threat.

Much of the Western intelligence debate around Chinese high-speed 5G technology has focused on hardware and software. Once the hardware is already out in the wild — which most think is inevitable — the future of the fight is in managing risk. It’s doable, if not yet widely advertised, according to several experts speaking at a U.S. intelligence conference this week, by quarantining Chinese equipment and deploying smarter electromagnetic spectrum management tools to better handle threats.

Bottom line: Huawei leads the world in the ability to rapidly produce cheap telecom hardware (as well as the underlying software.) Recent reports, including one from NATO, state it plainly. It’s one reason why European countries, including U.S. allies like Germany and the U.K., have been reluctant to ban tech from Huawei outright, even in the face of heavy U.S. pressure.

But — quietly — many European countries like the U.K. and France actually are banning Huawei’s 5G tech in part by effectively quarantining it away from vital parts of infrastructure, or military and intelligence activities, according to James Lewis, senior vice president at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. “They don’t let Huawei near their sensitive intelligence facilities, their sensitive military facilities,” said Lewis.

Some European countries are using architecture tricks to put Chinese tech on a short leash, Lewis said. For instance, a country might allow Huawei to play in the portion of the Radio Access Network where individual users connect to cell towers but not in what’s called the core network, where those towers connect and communicate to one another via a shared central node. “The theory is…watch them in the core network,” he said.

If you haven’t heard about that, that’s in part by design. Europeans, says Lewis, are eager to appear more neutral than their U.S. counterparts. “They don’t go around announcing it.”

If the United States can convince other countries to take similar risk approaches, then they will succeed in limiting the reach of Chinese telecom, even if they don’t succeed in banning it.

One of the Department of Homeland Security’s top advisors on the matter would not say if DHS was advocating a similar approach to 5G for the U.S.

https://www.defenseo...inas-5g/156355/

#124 amor de cosmos

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Posted 24 April 2019 - 08:27 AM

China’s first-mover advantage will come into play with the upcoming phase of 5G network deployment, according to a 2018 report by the Eurasia Group, a political risk consultancy headquartered in New York City. It’s part of China’s plan to establish commercial standalone 5G networks by 2020, which is at least several years ahead of the United States and other competing nations that have set 2025 as their target date.

That 5G rollout, which will require hefty investments in new infrastructure such as antennas and base stations, will enable some of the truly exciting applications and services that require near-instantaneous communications among possibly billions of new sensors and devices connected through the “Internet of Things.”

China has already made $180 billion in capital expenditures for 5G deployment over the past five years, installing about 350,000 5G-operable base stations, which is nearly 10 times the number currently deployed in the United States. Beyond China’s shores, Chinese telecom giant Huawei has also shipped 70,000 base stations and signed 40 contracts to sell 5G equipment in Europe, the Middle East, Asia, and Africa.

This head start will also give China an early lead in developing and deploying smarter cities, self-driving cars, and automated factories, says the Eurasia Group report. The opportunity to test new applications and use cases could in turn attract business from other countries that are looking to supply their own citizens with similar 5G-enabled applications and services.

*snip*

The United States currently favors millimeter wave (mm-wave) transmission, with high frequencies between 30 and 300 gigahertz. The shorter wavelengths in this range make for narrower beams that boost both the resolution and security of data transmissions. But they come with significant downsides, including limited range and an inability to penetrate obstacles such as walls and human bodies.

The short-wavelength route would require U.S. telecoms to build a very dense—and expensive—network of 5G base stations throughout any city or other geographic area to ensure reliable connectivity. The Defense Innovation Board report also cast some doubt on whether U.S. telecoms can absorb the cost of installing the infrastructure necessary for a full mm-wave network.

China’s has taken the opposite approach. It favors low-frequency transmission, primarily in the 3- and 4-GHz bands. This strategy enables Chinese telecoms to swiftly roll out broad 5G coverage with fewer base stations because the wavelengths in these bands are able to penetrate obstacles.

*snip*

Despite the sub-6-gigahertz setup’s advantages, U.S. telecoms and the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) still seem to favor the mm-wave approach. That’s largely because the U.S. government owns large chunks of the sub-6 spectrum and restricts commercial use of those bands. And it’s currently unclear whether the U.S. government will be willing to share or auction off even a sliver of it.

In most other countries, commercial access to the sub-6 spectrum isn’t impeded in this way. So, it’s reasonable to predict that China’s first-mover advantage could translate into most everyone else adopting its 5G equipment and services tailored for those low-frequency bands. If the United States continues to prioritize mm-wave deployment, U.S. telecoms and tech companies would face an uphill battle in trying to sell 5G equipment and services abroad.

https://spectrum.iee...chinas-5g-world

China Unicom will put in place uninterrupted 5G network coverage in major cities, according to its network deployment plan released Tuesday.

The 5G network will cover Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Nanjing, Hangzhou and urban Xiongan New Area, the plan said.

Meanwhile, 5G hotspot coverage will be made available in 33 cities and the company will also deploy the 5G private network and create 5G application scenarios in every walk of life in several cities to nurture the incubation of 5G applications and upgrade the industry.

China Unicom is vigorously pushing forward the innovative integration of 5G technology and applications and providing network support for 5G development, said China Unicom Chairman Wang Xiaochu.

http://www.ecns.cn/n...ef7887788.shtml

British Prime Minister Theresa May apparently gave Huawei the thumbs-up to help build the country's 5G infrastructure, in a limited way.

The National Security Council, which May chairs, agreed on Tuesday to let the scandal-scarred Chinese telecommunications giant work on "noncore" parts of the infrastructure, the Telegraph reported.

Home Secretary Sajid Javid, Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt, Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson, International Trade Secretary Liam Fox and International Development Secretary Penny Mordaunt expressed concerns about the agreement, the paper noted.

A government spokesperson noted via email that the council's decisions are "confidential" and that the security of the country's telecoms network is "of paramount importance."

"As part of our plans to provide world class digital connectivity, including 5G, we have conducted an evidence based review of the supply chain to ensure a diverse and secure supply base, now and into the future," the spokesperson wrote.

"This is a thorough review into a complex area and will report with its conclusions in due course."

https://www.cnet.com...infrastructure/

#125 amor de cosmos

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Posted 26 April 2019 - 08:14 AM

considering how fast things move these days I wonder what the world will look like in just a couple years
 

The military applications of 5G technology have vital strategic and battlefield implications for the U.S. Historically, the U.S. military has reaped enormous advantages from employing cutting edge technology on the battlefield. 5G technology holds similar innovative potential. Perhaps most obviously, the next generation of telecommunications infrastructure will have a direct impact on improving military communications. However, it will also produce cascading effects on the development of other kinds of military technologies, such as robotics and artificial intelligence. For instance, artificial intelligence and machine learning capabilities, such as those used in the Department of Defense’s Project Maven, could be greatly enhanced when leveraging the data processing speeds made possible through 5G infrastructure. As an era of great power competition emerges between the United States and China, the United States has a compelling strategic interest in being at the forefront of these new technologies.

*snip*

Due to this reality, the United States must consider and be prepared to conduct overseas contingency or counterterrorism operations in areas where Chinese telecommunications infrastructure is widely proliferated, thus restricting the United States’ ability to rely on indigenous telecoms. As noted by US AFRICOM Commander General Thomas Waldhauser, this has already become an issue in Africa where Chinese telecommunications companies are poised to dominate. The integrity of U.S. military communications systems that rely on 5G networks could be undermined at key phases of an operation. For example, if the United States is conducting a military operation in an area of interest to China, it is plausible that the Chinese government could leverage Huawei to intercept or even deny military communications. Furthermore, Chinese telecom infrastructure dominance in a theater of operations may limit the U.S. military’s ability to conduct precision targeting that leverages signals intelligence collection on 5G telecommunications networks.

*snip*

The strategic and battlefield implications of who owns and operates 5G infrastructure around the world underscores the national security importance of 5G. The U.S. government and its allies should more systematically assess both the opportunities and risks associated with conducting future military operations in environments that rely on Chinese technology.

To date, the U.S. government has devoted significant energy to persuading its allies and partners to follow the United States in prohibiting Chinese telecoms, particularly Huawei, from building and/or operating 5G infrastructure. However, its diplomatic approach has been met with varying degrees of success. While some countries such as Australia and Japan have fallen in line with the U.S. stance on Huawei, many others have not. The European Commission’s recent 5G recommendations for member states dismissed a ban on Chinese telecoms. British intelligence has reportedly maintained that the security risks associated with Huawei can be sufficiently managed, and New Zealand, after initially bandwagoning with the United States in December 2018, abruptly reversed course in February 2019. This is concerning for the United States because New Zealand and the UK are members of the Five Eyes intelligence-sharing alliance. Many allies have refused an outright ban of Huawei because of the company’s ability to offer 5G products at far cheaper rates than Western telecoms.

It is clear that U.S. diplomatic efforts are not working. The reality is that the bottom line is largely driving decision-making. Therefore, rather than take a purely negative approach, the United States should consider using positive inducements to make its 5G products more appealing. While the United States should not strive to mirror China’s top-down approach to innovation, it should work with allies to use market incentives to make U.S.- and Western-developed 5G infrastructure and products more competitive. Furthermore, the U.S. military needs to anticipate that its use of native telecommunications infrastructure in a future operating environment may be compromised, limited, or denied. The U.S. military will inevitably need greater bandwidth on the tactical edge and this should be an imperative that drives investment in research and development to address this challenge.

https://www.cfr.org/...tions-5g-debate
 

American diplomats have been warning US allies of the danger of using the Chinese company’s telecoms equipment, which they say could be used by Beijing for spying. But they have been unable to recommend or support a US company to step in and provide the same equipment instead.

“The White House keeps asking why we can’t do what Huawei does, and how long it would take for us to be able to do so,” said one US telecoms executive. “They don’t seem to understand — we gave that capability up a long time ago.”

*snip*

But some say the battle that followed left large US telecoms equipment makers — such as Lucent, which was spun out of AT&T and included Bell Labs — financially stretched, and the market as a whole fragmented.

Tom Lauria, a telecoms analyst and former director at Lucent, said: “After the Telecoms Act of 1996, we had a massive number of entrants into the market. To keep them going, we would finance almost everything they bought until they became mature enough to pay the money back. This was not a sustainable model.”

Others point out that the 1996 act allowed companies to develop and use their own network technologies, while in Europe companies all agreed to use GSM, which became the worldwide standard for mobile communications.

At the same time, said Mr Lauria, companies such as Lucent were also looking to sell into the fast-growing Chinese market, helping keep revenues afloat, but also sewing the seed for China’s eventual domination.

“Whenever we sold to the Chinese, they would demand that we manufacture locally and that we hand over the technology to our Chinese partners,” he said. “Western companies needed the revenue growth, and that meant we had to play by their rules.”

*snip*

Until recently, what some in the sector see as a commercial failure by US companies was not a political problem. But with the imminent roll-out of 5G, many in President Donald Trump’s administration are worried that the US will fall behind further.

As a result, some are promoting unlikely solutions, such as getting the US government to develop and build 5G networks instead.

*snip*

“The cost of replacing an entity on the scale of Huawei would be prohibitive,” said Mr Mayer. “The genie is already out of the bottle.”

https://www.ft.com/c...dc-98bf1d35a056

#126 Wayne

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 05:16 AM

"China has sentenced a Canadian citizen to death"

 

http://www.msn.com/e...b9&ocid=DELLDHP



#127 amor de cosmos

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Posted 30 April 2019 - 04:21 PM

By 2022, forecasters estimate that sub-Saharan Africa will have nearly 1 billion mobile phones—enough for the vast majority of the projected 1.2 billion people who will live there. What it won’t have are the endless streams of telephone poles and wires that cascade across other continents. Development experts call this an example of a “leapfrog technology.” By going straight to mobile, many African nations will be able to skip the step of building extensive and expensive landline infrastructure.

In fact, “some places will go straight to 5G,” says Vincent Kaabunga, chair of the IEEE Ad Hoc Committee on Africa, which has helped craft IEEE’s strategy to increase engineering capacity on the continent. With this kind of leapfrogging, African nations can take the lead in certain types of technological development and deployment, he says. Just look at mobile money: Companies such as M-Pesa sprang up to solve a local problem—people’s lack of access to brick-and-mortar banks—and became a way for people not only to make payments, but also to get loans and insurance. “We’ve refined the concept of mobile money over the last 10 or 15 years,” says Kaabunga, “while other parts of the world are just now coming around to embracing it.”

IEEE and its members in Africa are facilitating the application of new technologies by promoting education and access, says Kaabunga, who also works for a technology consulting firm in Kampala, Uganda. The IEEE in Africa Strategy, launched in 2017, calls for IEEE to support engineering education at every level and to advise government policymakers, efforts that Kaabunga and his colleagues in the region have already begun. For example, they’re currently working with the Smart Africa alliance, an initiative that aims to create standard policies for information and communications technology to enable a single digital marketplace across the continent.

https://spectrum.iee...t-to-the-future
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#128 amor de cosmos

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Posted 05 May 2019 - 07:26 AM

South China's technological powerhouse Shenzhen is expected to build about 7,000 5G base stations this year, local authorities said Saturday.

The city also plans to launch 5G for commercial use by 2020, according to the city's bureau of industry and information technology.

Enterprises based in the tech hub are expected to launch 5G terminal chips in the first half of this year. Smartphones and tablets featuring 5G will be launched gradually from the middle of this year, according to Xu Zhibin, deputy director of the bureau.

http://www.ecns.cn/n...pw8974550.shtml

Huawei is expected to open a 400-person chip research and development factory outside Cambridge, in the heart of the UK's silicon chip industry, according to a Saturday report by the Financial Times.

Located in the village of Sawston, about 7 miles from Cambridge, the plant is built for the research and development of broadband networks chips.

The facility is due to operate by 2021 and to create up to 400 jobs by then.

The London-based newspaper concluded that Huawei's decision to make chips in Cambridge would create powerful competition for the region's semiconductor talents.

The news is yet to be confirmed by the company, but its founder Ren Zhengfei did mention during an interview with the BBC in February this year, that the company would open an optical chip plant in Britain after purchasing around 500 acres of land in the county of Cambridge, in a bid to export optical chips to other western countries without transporting chips from China.

http://www.ecns.cn/n...pw8974726.shtml

#129 Wayne

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Posted 09 May 2019 - 07:31 AM

Moving on up.
 
"Meng Wanzhou gets approval to move to bigger, $13 million mansion".
 
This could last some time, her next scheduled court appearance is Sept 23.
 


#130 amor de cosmos

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 11:33 AM

A US Navy memo warns that 5G mobile networks are likely to interfere with weather satellites, and senators are urging the Federal Communications Commission to avoid issuing new spectrum licenses to wireless carriers until changes are made to prevent harms to weather forecasting.

The FCC has already begun an auction of 24GHz spectrum that would be used in 5G networks. But Sens. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.) today wrote a letter to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, asking him to avoid issuing licenses to winning bidders "until the FCC approves the passive band protection limits that the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) determine are necessary to protect critical satellite‐based measurements of atmospheric water vapor needed to forecast the weather."

Wyden and Cantwell said that the "ongoing sale of wireless airwaves could damage the effectiveness of US weather satellites and harm forecasts and predictions relied on to protect safety, property, and national security." They chided the FCC for beginning the auction "over the objections of NASA, NOAA, and members of the American Meteorological Society (AMS). These entities all argued that out-of-band emissions from future commercial broadband transmissions in the 24GHz band would disrupt the ability to collect water-vapor data measured in a neighboring frequency band (23.6 to 24GHZ) that meteorologists rely on to forecast the weather."

https://arstechnica....tes-navy-warns/

#131 todd

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 02:36 PM

I think I can get by without 5G?

Edited by todd, 15 May 2019 - 02:53 PM.


#132 sebberry

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Posted 15 May 2019 - 09:52 PM

Actually, bring it on. Maybe the forecasting will improve!


Victoria current weather by neighbourhood: Victoria school-based weather station network

Victoria webcams: Big Wave Dave Webcams

 


#133 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 03:38 AM

here is a 5g map:

 

https://www.speedtest.net/ookla-5g-map



#134 todd

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 08:59 AM

Actually, bring it on. Maybe the forecasting will improve!


Maybe the weather will actually improve.

#135 Mike K.

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 09:04 AM

If this means we’ll get weather faster and with less disruptions, I’m in.

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#136 todd

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 09:25 AM

If this means we’ll get weather faster and with less disruptions, I’m in.



Oh God I hope so. https://youtu.be/7YrImLVr8WY

#137 amor de cosmos

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 10:00 AM

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau accused Beijing of not playing by the same rules the large majority of democracies follow after Chinese authorities formally arrested two Canadians, accusing them of crimes related to national security.

Businessman Michael Spavor, who worked with North Korea, and former diplomat Michael Kovrig were picked up separately in December, shortly after Canada arrested Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver, and were recently arrested, according to both Chinese and Canadian officials.

Foreign ministry spokesperson Lu Kang told a daily news briefing in Beijing on Thursday morning that Kovrig — who now works for the International Crisis Group (ICG) a non-governmental organization which focuses on conflict resolution — is suspected of gathering state secrets for other countries and Spavor is accused of stealing and illegally providing state secrets, said Lu.

He didn't say when the men will be formally charged, just that they had recently been arrested. According to the Canadian government, people can be detained for up to 13½ months after an official arrest in China before formal charges are laid.

https://www.cbc.ca/n...ecret-1.5138103

#138 Mike K.

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 10:02 AM

Note to the Trudeau government: China is not a democracy.

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#139 todd

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 10:49 AM

https://youtu.be/cSIdB-IYIqk

#140 amor de cosmos

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Posted 17 May 2019 - 09:01 AM

TOKYO -- The U.S. Commerce Department on Thursday announced restrictions on exports of U.S. products to Huawei Technology that could be used to ban trade with China's telecommunications equipment giant. Huawei has been put on a blacklist known as the "Entity List”. Here are five things you need to know about it.

https://asia.nikkei....klist-on-Huawei

WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Commerce Department on Thursday announced a ban on exports of U.S. products to Huawei Technologies.

The penalty escalates the U.S.-China economic confrontation.

To prevent the Chinese telecommunications equipment giant from working around the rule through its affiliates, the ban also targets 68 of these companies around the world, including Japanese companies.

The Commerce Department added Huawei and 68 affiliates to the Entity List of foreign companies deemed to pose security risks. Producers that want to export products and software to companies on the list are required to obtain permission from the Commerce Department, which has stated that applications for these waivers will in general be denied.

https://asia.nikkei....es-to-blacklist

Huawei Technologies Co. has stockpiled enough chips and other vital components to keep its business running for at least three months as the U.S. curtails its access to American technology, people familiar with the matter said.

The Trump administration on Friday blacklisted China’s largest tech company -- which it accuses of aiding Beijing in espionage -- threatening to cut off the American software and semiconductors it needs to make smartphones and networking gear. But it’s been preparing for such an eventuality since at least the middle of 2018, hoarding components while designing its own chips, the people said.

Government officials also privately warned Huawei executives last year to explore non-American alternatives, the people said, asking not to be identified talking about internal affairs. The three-month cushion is a conservative internal estimate and the company could well sustain operations beyond that time-frame, they said.

The moves against China’s national champion may have devastating consequences for the rest of the world. Blocking the sale to Huawei of critical components such as semiconductors could cripple its operation, depress the businesses of American chip giants from Qualcomm Inc. to Micron Technology Inc. and retard the rollout of critical 5G wireless networks worldwide.

*snip*

In the longer term, Huawei still has to assure its customers -- many of the world’s largest telecommunications carriers -- that it can not just build, but also maintain, their wireless networks. The U.S. ban hits the Chinese company just as it’s jockeying for a big chunk of the hundreds of billions of dollars that the likes of Vodafone Group and China Mobile Ltd. are devising around the world, laying the foundation for future technologies from autonomous cars to smart cities.

Huawei’s predicament underscores the extent to which China as a whole is reliant on foreign chip technology: the country imports more semiconductors today than oil. While Huawei and peers such as Tsinghua Unigroup are designing increasingly advanced architectures, they haven’t reached sufficient scale in production to make a dent in that annual inflow.

https://www.bloomber...ad-of-trump-ban

Edited by amor de cosmos, 17 May 2019 - 09:03 AM.


 



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