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Jeopardy! - TV game show


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#21 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 02 May 2019 - 02:37 PM

James Holzhauer earned the record for second-longest winning streak in “Jeopardy!” regular play history with his 21st victory Thursday.

 

The native of Naperville on Wednesday tied for the title with Julia Collins, who in 2014 collected $428,100 over 20 games on the quiz show, before claiming it for his own one day later.

 

The 34-year-old Las Vegas sports bettor still has a long “Jeopardy!” journey ahead before toppling all-time regular play champion Ken Jenning’s 74-game record in 2004.

 

Andy Saunders, administrator of The Jeopardy Fan website, said “Jeopardy!” producers tape 230 episodes in a season. If Holzhauer continues to win the rest of the games in season 35, which is scheduled to end July 26, he will have reached win No. 62,he said.

 

The victory Thursday brings Holzhauer’s 20-day winnings to $1,608,627.

Saunders, who compiles statistics on “Jeopardy,” noted on his website that it took Jennings 48 games to reach $1,608,627.

 

https://www.chicagot...0503-story.html


Edited by Victoria Watcher, 02 May 2019 - 02:38 PM.


#22 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 02 May 2019 - 02:46 PM

also if you are a professional gambler with a demonstrated lengthy winning record would you be able to get financing from banks or wealthy individuals to substantially increase your wagers?

 

https://www.usatoday...gas/3653132002/



#23 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 02 May 2019 - 03:48 PM

here is some recent video of his play:

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=4IIN8iVWj9k



#24 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 03 May 2019 - 07:31 PM

‘Jeopardy!’ whiz James Holzhauer wins 22nd game, won’t play again for two weeks

https://nypost.com/2...-for-two-weeks/

#25 Cassidy

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Posted 03 May 2019 - 08:22 PM

also if you are a professional gambler with a demonstrated lengthy winning record would you be able to get financing from banks or wealthy individuals to substantially increase your wagers?

Most professional gamblers take a piece of action from other professional gamblers (often more than one).

Much like a diversified stock portfolio, professional gamblers will take a chunk of the action of another professional gambler (usually a friend, or at least a respected acquaintance) in order to reduce their exposure to the chance of going bust, and to maximize their opportunities when the odds swing in their favour. 

Often, two gamblers (or more) will take of piece of the action in each other simultaneously, thus limiting each of their exposure, and maximizing their ability to exploit opportunities.

 

Although taking a piece of another gambler sitting at your table is considered collusion (and therefore cheating), taking a piece of another gambler in a different tournament, or playing at a different casino is considered a wise business move.

 

I would posit that our friend Jepardy James is far, far more of a professional gambler than either he, or the Jepardy producers are letting on. He has discovered a series of exploitable flaws in the design of the game of Jeopardy, and he's exploiting the crap out of them.

If he was in a Las Vegas casino doing what he is doing now (repeatedly exploiting the same series of game flaws) the casino would have backed him off and barred him long ago.



#26 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 03:04 AM

interesting.

he’s a sports bettor though. are they often banned?

the thing about him exploiting jeopardy though is that he still has to be better than his two nightly opponents. that switch up every single game. so is that really exploiting? as you can see now his opponents use the same strategies but they simply can not buzz in as fast as he can or they do not know as many answers as he does.

#27 Mike K.

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 06:07 AM

From what I can see, the only gambling going on is on the Daily Doubles. Everything else comes down to a quick trigger fringer and knowledge.

Has the game been forever changed? Yes and no. Some people will attempt to go big at the start, but few will have the knowledge to provide correct answers, so the normal progression is likely to be maintained.

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#28 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 06:14 AM

going from the top square down never really made any sense really. or even staying in the same category really. your brain does not need to work that way.

this guy gets answers right. period. so when he gets an answer right he controls the board and gets another opportunity to find the daily double. but also when he uncovers a daily double he is able to bet large because he is likely to get it right.

his undoing will be when another contestant hits some daily doubles and also bets big and wins and or james gets two daily doubles wrong. that might require some good and bad luck.

Edited by Victoria Watcher, 04 May 2019 - 06:14 AM.


#29 Cassidy

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 11:05 PM

Selective aggression, money management, he protects his bankroll.

He's playing an advanced strategy of his own design, one that exploits weakness in the original design of the game.

 

He's doing a lot more than getting answers right and hitting the buzzer quickly.



#30 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 05 May 2019 - 02:13 AM

but hitting the buzzer right and getting answers right allows him to do the other stuff. if you don’t do that you have no money accumulation and no opportunity for other strategies. first and foremost you have to get the most cash quickly.

#31 Cassidy

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Posted 05 May 2019 - 06:24 AM

Yes, exercising a unique gambling strategy requires a multitude of skills.

That's why I said "he's doing a lot more than getting answers right and hitting the buzzer quickly".

 

But being fast and smart without selective aggression, money management, and protecting your bankroll just makes you another Jeopardy player ... which he most definitely isn't.

 

You're oversimplifying what he's doing, which as a by-product inadequately explains why he's breaking records.



#32 lanforod

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Posted 05 May 2019 - 06:33 AM

He's also got an element of luck here that always runs out at some point. No big deal, strategy or not, he isn't cheating and is obviously one of the most knowledgeable people to play the game.

#33 Rob Randall

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Posted 05 May 2019 - 07:01 AM

A knowledgeable person knows Cosette is the daughter of Fantine because they know Les Miserables backward and forward. James knows it because he used his amazing brain to memorize facts about the opera.

 

To be a champ you have to expand your natural knowledge base with flashcard memorization of your weak areas. They can name the sorcerer in The Tempest or the symbol for flourine but couldn't tell you the plot of the play or how that element reacts.

 

Not to take anything away from him, he is a genius. But it's a little like professional Scrabble players. Some don't even speak good English but they have memorized the current Scrabble dictionary and are strategical experts.


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#34 Cassidy

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Posted 05 May 2019 - 07:06 AM

He's also got an element of luck here that always runs out at some point. No big deal, strategy or not, he isn't cheating and is obviously one of the most knowledgeable people to play the game.

Indeed, he will lose at some point.

All gamblers do.



#35 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 05 May 2019 - 07:06 AM

he says he reads children’s books on subjects because they are often written for kids that do t necessarily have any interest in the subject.

#36 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 05 May 2019 - 07:07 AM

I wonder how many of the games he would have won if he bet nothing on the daily doubles.

#37 Cassidy

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Posted 05 May 2019 - 07:08 AM

......But it's a little like professional Scrabble players. Some don't even speak good English but they have memorized the current Scrabble dictionary and are strategical experts.

A normal person can't play against a Scrabble expert or pro. The experts memorization of the Scrabble dictionary renders any effort to play against them by somebody who hasn't memorized the Scrabble dictionary the equivalent of trying to push a rope up a hill.



#38 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 06 May 2019 - 05:44 PM

i’m almost sure james will write a book or 5.

he’s going to be in huge demand by gambling websites etc.

he’s pretty set.
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#39 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 21 May 2019 - 03:06 PM

Jeopardy Champ James Holzhauer Continues His Hot Streak — and Even Ken Jennings Is Cheering Him On
 

The 34-year-old professional sports gambler is closing in on Ken Jennings Jeopardy! records, but Jennings himself says he's cheering Holzhauer on

 

 

https://people.com/t...winning-streak/



#40 Rob Randall

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Posted 21 May 2019 - 03:31 PM

Last night the other guy was in challenging range until James hit both daily doubles, blowing the poor rival out of the water in a matter of seconds. With his big bets there's just not enough potential money left on the board for any challengers at that late stage of the game.


"[Randall's] aesthetic poll was more accurate than his political acumen"

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