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PROPOSED
Duck's Building Hotel
Uses: hotel, commercial
Address: 1314-1324 Broad Street
Municipality: Victoria
Region: Downtown Victoria
Storeys: 6
The Duck's Building development is a proposal to build a six-storey, 137-room hotel with ground floor retail s... (view full profile)
Learn more about Duck's Building Hotel on Citified.ca
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[Downtown Victoria] Duck's Building hotel | Hotel; retail | 6-storeys | Proposed


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#41 Rob Randall

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Posted 26 September 2019 - 08:23 PM

The sometimes-confused Victoria News posted a story that made it seem like this is a done deal:

 

A Vancouver-based developer is bringing some modern updates to a heritage-facade building in downtown Victoria.

The collected properties in the 1300-block of Broad Street, including the heritage Ducks Building, will soon be transformed into a 137-room, six-storey hotel with retail space underneath.

 

 

But of course the project is early in the approval stages. It hasn't even come before committee of the whole. 


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"[Randall's] aesthetic poll was more accurate than his political acumen"

-Tom Hawthorne, Toronto Globe and Mail


#42 Mike K.

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Posted 26 September 2019 - 09:35 PM

It’s Nicole Crescenzi, BP’s resident Citified article re-writer.

Note her title: New downtown Victoria hotel to offer car elevator, bee sanctuary

And the Citified article: Proposal for 137-room Broad Street hotel to include bee habitat, car elevator

There will be two car elevators, actually. I specified an elevator (singular) to see if anyone would bite, and Crescenzi did. Sloppy sleuthing for a reported not to catch it.

Anyways...

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#43 aastra

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Posted 27 September 2019 - 11:59 AM

Methinks too many of these supposedly sensitive modern designs have brick cladding right down to the sidewalk. I don't have a problem with some of them doing it, but almost all of them do it. On the corner of Broad and Johnson there's an old cast-iron commercial frontage. I'm wondering if the left section below wouldn't have a fair bit more personality if those brick-covered pillars on the ground floor were cast iron instead (or if they were anything other than the same brick as on the upper levels).

 

The old ground floors weren't blah. More often than not they showed off a ton of distinction and personality.

 

post-3717-0-37077300-1568678521.png


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#44 G-Man

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Posted 27 September 2019 - 02:00 PM

This observation is so bang on. I had not really internalised my concern with many these newer buildings but is exactly it. Brick to the ground.

Visit my blog at: https://www.sidewalkingvictoria.com 

 

It has a whole new look!

 


#45 Jackerbie

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 08:45 AM

Methinks too many of these supposedly sensitive modern designs have brick cladding right down to the sidewalk. I don't have a problem with some of them doing it, but almost all of them do it. On the corner of Broad and Johnson there's an old cast-iron commercial frontage. I'm wondering if the left section below wouldn't have a fair bit more personality if those brick-covered pillars on the ground floor were cast iron instead (or if they were anything other than the same brick as on the upper levels).

 

The old ground floors weren't blah. More often than not they showed off a ton of distinction and personality.

 

Additions with personality would be against the heritage design guidelines, they're supposed to fade into the (brick) background



#46 Rob Randall

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 08:53 AM

But there has to be something big and solid-looking on the ground for the brick to sit atop. Otherwise it doesn't make visual sense. The brick ends up looking like a cheap cladding. 


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"[Randall's] aesthetic poll was more accurate than his political acumen"

-Tom Hawthorne, Toronto Globe and Mail


#47 aastra

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 10:18 AM

Those old ground floors with tall windows and fine dividers amidst extensive glass coverage often gave the impression that they were lighter than the levels above.

 

Cast iron storefront at Johnson and Broad...

 

Or this one below:

 

post-13-0-32390400-1550521787.jpg

pic from https://archives.vic...rnment-street-2


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#48 aastra

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 10:21 AM

I feel like the modern wing of the hotel at Johnson and Broad is a serious offender re: thick brick pillars down to the ground that detract from the overall effect.


Edited by aastra, 30 September 2019 - 10:22 AM.

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#49 Rob Randall

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 10:31 AM

As it is in so many respects, the Magnolia Hotel is a good example of what to do right. It doesn't have to be sold blocks of marble. 

 

Capture.JPG

 

 

 


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"[Randall's] aesthetic poll was more accurate than his political acumen"

-Tom Hawthorne, Toronto Globe and Mail


#50 m3m

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 10:51 AM

I've always liked the look of the Hotel Rialto:  https://www.google.c...!7i13312!8i6656o



 



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