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Victoria homelessness issues


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#16201 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 03 December 2018 - 03:00 PM

If you're giving to a charity that spends up over 60% to 70% of its contributions on administrative costs, then it's a pretty sure bet that your money is (in fact) going to pay off the loan on the charity CEO's 2018 Audi Quattro.

 

good cause charity #1 is very conservative with fundraising and admin expenses.  they rely solely on scarce volunteers and collect $100,000 and $90,000 goes to find the cure for the disease.

 

good cause charity #2 takes a more aggressive view towards fundraising.  they collect $17 million and $10 million goes to finding a cure for the disease. 

 

which charity is more likely to find the cure?



#16202 lanforod

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Posted 03 December 2018 - 03:01 PM

Exactly. It doesn't take long, and helps encourage charities to be efficient. If everyone did it, we'd get a lot more bang for our buck over time.



#16203 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 03 December 2018 - 03:20 PM

If everyone did it, we'd get a lot more bang for our buck over time.

 

i disagree. if every charity committed to no more than 10% for fundraising and and admin overall giving would just drop right off.



#16204 Midnightly

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Posted 03 December 2018 - 03:23 PM

i remember years ago mark zuckerberg going on about charities and how throwing money blindly at a charity can sometimes cause more harm then good after giving huge donations to some places (i remember one specifically about donating a large sum-millions, to a school to improve the school and education being offered only to have most the money was eaten up by admin and consultants and very little trickled down to actually see the kids) in the end he created his own charity to help prevent this from happening and to have a say where the money directly goes

 

not saying people should be starting up charities left and right, but doing more research and finding out where the money plans to go and how they plan to use it (especially if you plan to donate a larger sum of money) seems important  especially now a days when it seems everyone is asking for money



#16205 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 03 December 2018 - 03:33 PM

Activist and fundraiser Dan Pallotta calls out the double standard that drives our broken relationship to charities. Too many nonprofits, he says, are rewarded for how little they spend -- not for what they get done. Instead of equating frugality with morality, he asks us to start rewarding charities for their big goals and big accomplishments (even if that comes with big expenses). In this bold talk, he says: Let's change the way we think about changing the world.

 

video that might even change your mind:

 

https://www.ted.com/...ong?language=en


Edited by Victoria Watcher, 03 December 2018 - 03:35 PM.


#16206 lanforod

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Posted 03 December 2018 - 04:08 PM

I don't have a problem with charities that spend a lot. I have a problem with charities that spend $50 to fund-raise $100, and charities that pay their staff exorbant salaries or eat up massive amounts of funds for administrative purposes. 

 

I get that it usually costs money to fund-raise, but there are plenty of charities that do it effectively and efficiently, and there are those that don't. For the most part, it isn't hard to find out which belongs in which group.

Each to their own, but I'm sticking with my strategy here.



#16207 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 03 December 2018 - 04:15 PM

if you watch the video the author explains that if your want to attract top talent your charity you have to pay the executive well.  that seems right.

 

 

 

Businessweek did a survey, looked at the compensation packages for MBAs 10 years of business school, and the median compensation for a Stanford MBA, with bonus, at the age of 38, was 400,000 dollars. Meanwhile, for the same year, the average salary for the CEO of a $5 million-plus medical charity in the U.S. was 232,000 dollars, and for a hunger charity, 84,000 dollars. Now, there's no way you're going to get a lot of people with $400,000 talent to make a $316,000 sacrifice every year to become the CEO of a hunger charity.

Some people say, "Well, that's just because those MBA types are greedy." Not necessarily. They might be smart. It's cheaper for that person to donate 100,000 dollars every year to the hunger charity, save 50,000 dollars on their taxes, so still be roughly 270,000 dollars a year ahead of the game, now be called a philanthropist because they donated 100,000 dollars to charity, probably sit on the board of the hunger charity, indeed, probably supervise the poor SOB who decided to become the CEO of the hunger charity, and have a lifetime of this kind of power and influence and popular praise still ahead of them.

 

 

https://genius.com/D...wrong-annotated


Edited by Victoria Watcher, 03 December 2018 - 04:18 PM.


#16208 LJ

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Posted 03 December 2018 - 07:39 PM

I like this site....

 

https://www.charityintelligence.ca/


Life's a journey......so roll down the window and enjoy the breeze.

#16209 A Girl is No one

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Posted 12 December 2018 - 08:47 PM

Question: why are there no (or almost no) people sleeping in parks when it rains?

#16210 sdwright.vic

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Posted 12 December 2018 - 08:52 PM

Ask a judge that during the next case!
  • A Girl is No one likes this
Predictive text and a tiny keyboard are not my friends!

 



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