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[Central Saanich] Jesken Town Centre (Costco) | Cancelled


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#1 obscurantist

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 02:42 PM

The first Indian band in a Canadian province to receive GST revenue wants its $130,000 monthly cheque to balloon, so the Tsawout First Nation has put out the welcome mat for tax-generating businesses.

Negotiations with big-box stores Costco and Wal-Mart have Tsawout Chief Allan Claxton feeling bullish.

He expects a deal to be struck with one of them some time this year.

On Tsawout territory, the GST is called the First Nations Goods and Services Tax (FNGST). Paid by everyone, including status Indians, the FNGST is set at 6 per cent....

The 240-hectare Tsawout reserve on the busy Pat Bay Highway is 15 minutes north of downtown Victoria. Victoria International Airport is minutes away from the reserve and the B.C. ferry terminal is a 10-minute drive north.

It's a great location for commercial business, Mr. Claxton believes. Another plus is that it's next to the Municipality of Central Saanich, two-thirds of which is protected by the Agricultural Land Reserve.

Central Saanich Mayor Jack Mar, 66, a farmer for 46 years, said very few hectares are left for large developments.

Costco approached Central Saanich about two years ago. But strong public opposition and the municipality's rural-focused community plan shut the lid on the big box. ...

If development unfolds as predicted, Mr. Claxton said that his band will need to buy more land. The band has been eyeing the 305-hectare Vantreight Farms, North America's second largest daffodil grower.

Land purchases will be financed with FNGST funds.

"As long as the government has the GST, we'll keep getting it," Mr. Claxton said. "It's money that stays in the community. Positive things come from it. Otherwise, it goes to Ottawa into a big, black hole."

Canada's first FNGST agreement was finalized in 2004 with a Yukon band. Later this year, native communities in Eastern Canada and Yukon should have agreements. And four more B.C. bands have expressed interest in the FNGST, according to the Department of Finance.

Under the agreements, the bands agree to give up their GST-free status in exchange for a share of the revenue. ...

Financial self-sufficiency makes it easier for bands to opt out of the federal Indian Act and run their reserves like a municipality without federal input.

Mr. Claxton says self-government will allow the band to create more jobs and reduce dependency.

"We know our needs. We want to get off welfare. Welfare was never something our people believed in," said the chief, who in previous careers managed a grocery store in nearby Sidney, and worked as a long-term-care nurse. ...

For the 2005-06 fiscal year, the Tsawout received $3.2-million in federal funds.

Several non-Tsawout businesses -- including motels, gas stations, restaurants and offices -- continue to send their collected FNGST to the Canada Revenue Agency.

The Department of Finance determines how much is returned to the Tsawout.

Based on an estimate of the net GST collected in B.C. for one year, the government calculates the Tsawout's share of the FNGST using a formula based on the number of band members aged 15 and up, and their income.

The band has about 500 members living on the urban reserve, at least 60 per cent of them under the age of 30.

About 1,500 non-natives also live on the reserve, lease land and pay property taxes. They also figure into FNGST calculations.

If new businesses materialize, the FNGST returned to the Tsawout will increase. But the estimated value of the goods and services tax paid by the Tsawout when they are away from the reserve is deducted from that.

The end result of the formula is that the net FNGST returned to the Tsawout will be lower than the total collected by FNGST-paying businesses on the reserve.

The 130-seat White Spot family restaurant pays about $8,000 a month to lease property on the reserve.

A manager wasn't aware that some of the roughly $10,000 per month of FNGST collected at the eatery will go back to the Tsawout.

"I didn't know they could do that," said Jenny Paiva, 28. "Sometimes it seems like they benefit more. When does it stop? When will everyone be equal?"

However, Sandy Mackay, the manager of the 51-unit Super 8 Motel, was aware of the new regime. Procedurally, nothing has changed for her.

"They [the federal government] still grab our taxes by the 15th of each month," said Ms. Mackay, 56.

She thinks it's wonderful that the Tsawout are receiving tax money.

"If the money goes to the right hands and they do as they say, hats off to them."

Mr. Claxton has plans.

The priority is a $5-million sports facility for Tsawout youth. Work will begin this spring on a gym/community hall, state-of-the-art lacrosse box and year-round soccer field.

The FNGST revenue may also be used to subsidize postsecondary education for band members.

And the Tsawout's two-year-old health and community-care centre will benefit.

The FNGST will also fund research and lawyers for the Tsawout's bid to prove that their traditional lands were taken and should be returned. ...



#2 aastra

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Posted 02 February 2007 - 04:28 PM

Can't be a Wal-Mart store in the works. Between the one in the 'burbs and the soon-to-be-supersized one at Town & Country, there's no way Greater Victoria can tolerate still more, is there? Please say no.

Are we trying to turn Greater Victoria into Alberta or something?

#3 ressen

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Posted 03 February 2007 - 07:49 PM

Maybe its IKEA

#4 Holden West

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Posted 03 February 2007 - 08:13 PM

Is is February already? Time for the annual IKEA rumour!

When Ivar emerges from his duvet around this time and sees his shadow, there may (or may not) be an IKEA constructed in Victoria (or Nanaimo, or Vancouver Island) providing the surrounding population reaches 500,000 (or 750,000 or 1 million) and the planet Venus aligns with Mars.
"Beaver, ahoy!""The bridge is like a magnet, attracting both pedestrians and over 30,000 vehicles daily who enjoy the views of Victoria's harbour. The skyline may change, but "Big Blue" as some call it, will always be there."
-City of Victoria website, 2009

#5 m0nkyman

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Posted 03 February 2007 - 08:31 PM

If we get one before Winnipeg, they are going to be sooooooooo envious. ;)

#6 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 12:04 AM

Is is February already? Time for the annual IKEA rumour!

When Ivar emerges from his duvet around this time and sees his shadow, there may (or may not) be an IKEA constructed in Victoria (or Nanaimo, or Vancouver Island) providing the surrounding population reaches 500,000 (or 750,000 or 1 million) and the planet Venus aligns with Mars.


I believe they strive for 1M before thay make a store.

#7 G-Man

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 10:40 AM

Oh no not Ikea rumour time again!

i would bet that it will be Costco as there is only one here now. And it must be pretty inconvenient if you live in Sidney to go there. Not that I support Costco or that type of store but I am sure that is the corporate thinking.

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#8 renthefinn

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Posted 04 February 2007 - 09:37 PM

Home Depot?

#9 hungryryno

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Posted 19 April 2007 - 02:25 PM

We could really use a Red Lobster somewhere!

Costco originally wanted to go on Keating X Rd and then Airport lands, but Central Saanich and North Saanich both said no. So they all went to Langdford.


No more Home Depots two stores and still crappy service. I've walked out of both stores with full carts left in the aisle because of the lack of customer service. At the Saanich one two employees closed an ailse and then went for lunch and I couldn't get my cart out from where I was. I shop at Rona thank you!

#10 gumgum

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Posted 19 April 2007 - 06:55 PM

They're nice at Rona but the people working there are useless with a capital "U". Twice - 2 separate times!- I found myself stuck at the service desk for over half-an-hour because they couldn't figure out how to tell the computer that my order was already paid for - I paid for it the day I ordered it. The second time I eventually gave up my passive patience and told them how to do it.

#11 gumgum

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Posted 19 April 2007 - 06:57 PM

^Maybe it was just the people at the service desk. The door guy was knowledgeable - and so was the paint lady. The cashier didn't leave an impression.

#12 G-Man

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Posted 20 April 2007 - 06:33 AM

Well I have been to Home Depot 3 times in the last couple of months each time picking up and then returning my countertop that I ordered but that they cannot seem to get right...

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#13 Holden West

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Posted 20 April 2007 - 09:11 AM

They're angry at you for not clicking their banner ad. \/
"Beaver, ahoy!""The bridge is like a magnet, attracting both pedestrians and over 30,000 vehicles daily who enjoy the views of Victoria's harbour. The skyline may change, but "Big Blue" as some call it, will always be there."
-City of Victoria website, 2009

#14 Mike K.

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 08:13 AM

With recent news that Costco has kept up its drive to open a store in Central Saanich, the region might finally have an alternative to driving to Langford for most things "big box."

The first Costco had opted to locate in Langford due to opposition by residents to open a store on the peninsula in the early 1990's.

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#15 Sparky

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 10:46 AM

^ Didn't Costco first attempt a store in the Selkirk area before Central Saanich?

Much to the neighbours shagrin.

#16 Mike K.

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 01:06 PM

I hadn't heard of that proposal before! You mean where Selkirk Waterfront is now located?

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#17 Sparky

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 07:37 AM

^ Yes, that is where it was proposed. Unfortunately I can not find any references that back up my statement. It was a short lived proposal.

If my memory serves me correctly it was around the time that the Pro Pats Legion relocated from downtown to the Selkirk. I worked nearby at the time and thought it would be handy to pick up some socks on my way for a beer.

Maybe it was all just a dream? :)

#18 D.L.

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 08:29 PM

Here's the proposed location, Jesken Rd. (Jus Kun Rd.) just north of the Saanich Historical Artifacts Society - http://maps.google.c...lumbia&t=h&z=17

#19 aastra

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 10:50 AM

Check this out:
"Work Together on Area's Future" (Times-Colonist, February 16, 2012)

Currently, the zoning scheme for central Keating prohibits stores larger than 5,000 square metres.

In times gone by, that limitation made sense. The surrounding population wasn't large enough to support major retail outlets. But in recent years, as the population has grown, Keating has been stifled by this restriction. The local hardware store was closed, and that caused a domino effect. Several adjacent businesses followed suit and new tenants weren't found.

Read more: http://www.timescolonist.com/news/Work+together+area+future/6161850/story.html#ixzz1mfM7hCDW


So when the population was smaller, large businesses were prohibited because large businesses wouldn't have survived? But now that the population is larger, small businesses can't survive?

Keep in mind that the population of Central Saanich has increased by about 4,500 in the past 25 years. Not exactly booming growth. Yet the time has come to give the green light to big box stores? Something smells.

#20 Nparker

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 11:16 AM

...the time has come to give the green light to big box stores? Something smells.


What you smell is the aroma of lost tax revenue from CS' coffers, when Big Box stores are able to build on land within the municipality that is owned by First Nations people. More power to the latter. CS made its reduced-tax bed and now they can lie in it.

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