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Historically themed websites


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#1 gumgum

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Posted 04 November 2006 - 10:22 PM

Sorry if this website has been posted already.
http://vihistory.ca/
It's kinda neat.

#2 Holden West

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Posted 04 November 2006 - 10:27 PM

Good idea. We can post our favourite historical sites here.

Here's a UVic directory that archives several student websites on Victoria history:

http://web.uvic.ca/~hist66/

-From Outpost to City-Wharf Street 1881

-Maynard's Photographic Gallery

-An Alternative Walking Tour of Victoria, BC

-Victoria's Victoria
"Beaver, ahoy!""The bridge is like a magnet, attracting both pedestrians and over 30,000 vehicles daily who enjoy the views of Victoria's harbour. The skyline may change, but "Big Blue" as some call it, will always be there."
-City of Victoria website, 2009

#3 gumgum

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Posted 04 November 2006 - 11:16 PM

I can't get enough of these sites.

I've updated the title of the thread.

#4 Number Six

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Posted 05 November 2006 - 10:12 AM

Here's one that contains everything you need to know about Beacon Hill Park:

http://www.islandnet.com/beaconhillpark/

#5 Number Six

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Posted 05 November 2006 - 10:17 AM

These are B.C., rather than just Victoria, but worth checking out:

http://www.bchistory.ca/

http://victoria.tc.ca/Resources/bchistory-exhibits.html

and of course the City of Victoria archives:

http://www.victoria.ca/archives/archives.shtml

in addition to the B.C. archives you'll find Victoria images at the Library and Archives Canada website:

http://www.collectionscanada.ca/index-e.html

#6 Holden West

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Posted 05 November 2006 - 05:49 PM

This is the Vancouver Library site but they have some fantastic Victoria photographs too.

(Which I'm sure we'll be seeing in other threads soon! :) )

http://www.vpl.vanco... ... agree.html
"Beaver, ahoy!""The bridge is like a magnet, attracting both pedestrians and over 30,000 vehicles daily who enjoy the views of Victoria's harbour. The skyline may change, but "Big Blue" as some call it, will always be there."
-City of Victoria website, 2009

#7 Bernard

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Posted 27 August 2008 - 01:51 PM

A blog on James Bay History

John Lutz's site

and E and N history site

A page on the Yates family

#8 Rob Randall

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Posted 12 December 2008 - 05:46 AM

The Times Colonist's new archives site is great. I love how it's searchable.

I found my great-grandparent's wedding announcement. We never would have been able to find this otherwise.

Victoria Daily Colonist
Saturday, July 3, 1909

Last evening at "Breadalbane," the Rev. Dr. Campbell celebrated the marriage of Mr. David Randall and Miss Jermina Campbell, youngest daughter of Mr. Alexander Sutherland, of Edinburgh. The bridegroom was supported by Mr. John B. Wood, and the bridesmaid was Miss Violet N. Wood. The bride arrived from Edinburgh last week. After the marriage ceremony the bride and bridegroom, with a few intimate friends had supper at Mr. and Mrs. Sullivan's, Penwell street. Mr. and Mrs. Randall will reside on Gamma street.



#9 Rob Randall

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Posted 12 December 2008 - 06:16 AM

Here is an excerpt from an article about a relative on my mother's side of the family, D.M. Eberts who I am told was my great-great uncle:

Victoria Daily Colonist
July 6, 1898

SAANICH IS IN LINE.
-----
Rousing Reception Tendered the
Attorney-General at the Saan-
ichton Meeting.
------
He Speaks for Three Hours and
is Most Attentively List-
tened To.
------
Mr. Yates Appeals to the Electors
on Local Grievances Entirely--
Joseph Martin Repudiated.
------

Hon. D. M. Eberts, Attorney-General, spoke for upwards of three hours at the Agricultural hall, Saanichton, on Monday evening on the general policy of the government and was most attentively listened to. It was 9 o'clock when the meeting opened and Mr. Eberts started his address, which he continued until 11:15, without interruption, except from a young man from the city, who had imbibed too freely and asked a lot of silly questions, and a couple of opposition candidates for the position of road boss who had a wordy war at the rear of the hall, as to which was to be the successor of the present incumbent, if the government was defeated. They will both continue out of a job, particularly if the feeling throughout the province is as favorable to the government as the people of South Victoria showed themselves to be on Monday evening. The Attorney-General received a most enthusiastic reception and delivered a masterful speech.



#10 G-Man

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Posted 12 December 2008 - 07:13 AM

Gamma Street? Wow must have been a different place!

#11 Rob Randall

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Posted 12 December 2008 - 07:46 AM

I assume it was near Alpha, Beta, etc. on the other side of Douglas in the Burnside area, before it turned commercial/industrial.

#12 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 12 December 2008 - 07:53 AM

I assume it was near Alpha, Beta, etc. on the other side of Douglas in the Burnside area, before it turned commercial/industrial.


Gamma Street is still there.

http://maps.google.c...F-8&sa=N&tab=wl

#13 G-Man

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Posted 12 December 2008 - 08:58 AM

It is, I was just hinting that you wouldn't today acknowledge you lived there in the paper.

#14 Rob Randall

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Posted 12 December 2008 - 07:36 PM

The huge boulevard trees on nearby Speed Street hint that Gamma might have been a pleasant residential suburb.

#15 victorian fan

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Posted 13 December 2008 - 09:18 AM

People were still living in homes behind the Red Lion when it was first built in 1968.

.

#16 Coreyburger

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Posted 14 December 2008 - 12:13 AM

The whole area near Point Ellice house used to be high end residential.

#17 Jacques Cadé

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Posted 16 June 2009 - 07:33 PM

Not sure where else to put this. There's a new item on Unknown Victoria about the Indian legend of Knockan Hill.

#18 Holden West

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Posted 19 July 2009 - 07:08 AM

Here's a task for Obsessive Compulsive amateur editors. Historic Australian newspapers is in beta mode--decades of news, some containing local content are online and searchable, carrying on from 1910 where the British Colonist site leaves off. Trouble is, the electronic translation is spotty due to poor imagery so hand-editing is needed. You don't need to register, just type in the key code to log in and start editing. A godsend for insomniacs.
"Beaver, ahoy!""The bridge is like a magnet, attracting both pedestrians and over 30,000 vehicles daily who enjoy the views of Victoria's harbour. The skyline may change, but "Big Blue" as some call it, will always be there."
-City of Victoria website, 2009

#19 aastra

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Posted 19 July 2009 - 10:15 AM

Excerpts from
"Victoria, Vancouver Island"
The Brisbane Courier
Thursday, March 12, 1868

A correspondent of the Alta California writing from Victoria in December last, gives the following account of the rapid decline in that city:

"This city has experienced two flush periods, and two otherwise -- one of the latter in full vigor now. Its lovely site accounts in some measure for the lavish outlays of money in the construction of business houses and ornate residences, but the main cause was excitement incited by the gold discoveries northward. It was founded in 1858, during the Fraser River stampede. As many as 15,000 adventurers were here at one time, camped in tents, and out of them. A city of houses grew up with almost unheard of rapidity, and nearly as speedily declined, thousands having left in '58, disgusted. The Fraser bubble did not appear and collapse to no purpose, as it no doubt led to the discovery of the Cariboo mines, in 1860, which in the next two years called hither many thousand people. These mines were very productive, and a stream of gold poured into Victoria, which gave the place new life, and the people a mistaken confidence that it must be a second San Francisco."

"It's early commercial importance was overrated, as was the up-country gold mines. The heavy class of steamers do not come here now, but put in at Esquimalt harbor, three miles from here, which is deeper, more spacious, fully as secure after entrance, which is made with greater ease and safety than Victoria Inlet. Her Majesty's ironclad Zealous and other Government vessels now lie there. The California steamers put in there also. Immense naval works are contemplated by Government, and many things point it out as destined to overshadow this city in time."

#20 Mike K.

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Posted 19 July 2009 - 10:21 AM

Esquimalt was destined to overshadow Victoria? I knew it :)

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