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Port Alberni container port


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#41 Mike K.

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 07:49 AM

For the same reasons Prince Rupert makes sense, the Alberni terminal makes sense.

 

Shipping companies don't necessarily care about the logistics on the ground, that's somebody else's job to figure out. They care about the fastest shipping time from Point A to Point B and a terminal in the Alberni Inlet (it wouldn't be all the way up the inlet, it'd be approximately half-way up the inlet) cuts an entire day off their sailing times. That's huge.

 

I would imagine that the containers will be moved via rail to the Nanaimo area (the rail right-of-way already exists, it just needs proper upgrading which is far cheaper than cutting a new route). From there they would indeed be loaded onto freight barges or freight+rail barges like they use in Alaska (see picture below). There would be enough containers on such a barge to stack an entire CN freight train, if not enough for a second train.

 

There's also the environmental issue. Fewer massive vessels traversing the straight means fewer disruptions for wildlife and a significantly reduced risk of an incident.

 

1-235.jpg


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#42 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 08:02 AM

A day less sailing and a whole whack of expensive logistics on the ground to get it landed here and then on to the Mainland.  So it goes from the most efficient way to move freight in the world (water) to all the lesser ones.


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#43 Mike K.

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 08:12 AM

I think the issue is Vancouver is running out of capacity. So its either billions in investment to expand or build new terminal capacity in arguably the most expensive jurisdiction in Canada, or to use Port Alberni which removes vessels from the straight, already has a rail connection and is just a 1.5 hour sailing away from Nanaimo to several terminal areas with awaiting freight railyards.


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#44 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 08:15 AM

That sounds fair if the have space problems. I’m not sure they do. When they get self driving trucks they can get more moving away from the Port lot quicker.
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#45 Mike K.

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 08:18 AM

The primary transport from the terminals is rail, I think. Trucks are mostly used for shifting capacity between terminals, no? I dunno, but I think that's how it works.

 

You don't often see trucks hauling just containers on anything other than relatively short trips (i.e. a container load of building materials gets plucked off the boat and loaded on a truck destined for Victoria, etc.).


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#46 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 08:20 AM

What are all those truckers that continually strike/gripe in Vancouver?

 

 

 

More than 600 truckers say they're effectively out of a job after Port Metro Vancouver granted access to just 68 companies under a new licensing system finalized Friday.

 

Port Metro Vancouver promised to create a new system after drivers, complaining of long wait times and low rates, conducted a bitter work stoppage for nearly a month last year.

Under the system announced Friday, 68 companies representing 1,450 trucks have been approved to serve the port. Last year the number of trucks working the port was estimated at more than 2,000.

 

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...ystem-1.2931314


Edited by VicHockeyFan, 18 November 2017 - 08:24 AM.

<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#47 Mike K.

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 08:22 AM

From a decade ago, even:

 

Canada's Port of Vancouver is struggling with container capacity problems and raising costs to shippers amid rising Asian trade.

 

Operating capacity of the two terminals which handle the bulk of the traffic at Vancouver's three container terminals "has either been reached, as in the case of Vanterm, or has been exceeded, as in the case of Deltaport," operator TSI Terminal Systems said recently."

 

https://www.joc.com/...s_20060605.html


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#48 Mike K.

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 08:23 AM

What are all those truckers that continually strike/gripe in Vancouver?

 

Exactly those guys, the guys who move containers short distances. Their grievances were more or less the same as dump truck drivers' grievances.


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#49 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 08:29 AM

Expand Deltaport.  It's in shallow water (I mean if they just need more yard space).  If they need more unloading space for another ship, that looks more difficult.

 

screenshot-www.google.ca-2017-11-18-08-28-06-018.png

 

.


Edited by VicHockeyFan, 18 November 2017 - 08:31 AM.

<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#50 Mike K.

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 08:30 AM

I'm not sure if that's politically correct nowadays.


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#51 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 08:32 AM

I'm not sure if that's politically correct nowadays.

 

They have beavers in the way?  OK.


<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#52 Mike K.

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 08:34 AM

Exactly!

 

Yeah, I think they have overall capacity issues. That's why we're seeing more and more vessels just chilling off Royal Roads and off Cowichan. Sometimes they're hanging out for weeks because they've missed their queue.


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#53 sdwright.vic

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 08:50 AM

So is it possible that stuff being delivered to Vancouver Island could possible end up making stuff that has to be delivered to Vancouver Island?

Or will something stupid happen, like everything still ending up in Vancouver and then being delivered back here again?
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#54 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 08:56 AM

So is it possible that stuff being delivered to Vancouver Island could possible end up making stuff that has to be delivered to Vancouver Island?

Or will something stupid happen, like everything still ending up in Vancouver and then being delivered back here again?

 

That's just the way supply chains work.  There is a reason all cars bought in BC are not made in BC, even if some parts are.  It's the reason water is bottled near Hope and is sold in Calgary, and bread baked in Calgary is sold in Vancouver.


Edited by VicHockeyFan, 18 November 2017 - 08:57 AM.

<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#55 sdwright.vic

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 09:19 AM

^No one said supply chains where intelligent now, did they. That's why there are still local places that bake bread in pretty much everywhere.
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#56 Bingo

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 03:18 PM

From a decade ago, even:

 

Canada's Port of Vancouver is struggling with container capacity problems and raising costs to shippers amid rising Asian trade.

 

Operating capacity of the two terminals which handle the bulk of the traffic at Vancouver's three container terminals "has either been reached, as in the case of Vanterm, or has been exceeded, as in the case of Deltaport," operator TSI Terminal Systems said recently."

 

https://www.joc.com/...s_20060605.html

 

More on ports here;

https://vibrantvicto...hipping/page-42



#57 lanforod

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Posted 18 November 2017 - 10:32 PM

Related to all this is the issue of the George Massey tunnel. It prevents larger ships from just heading up river and unloading in New West or Surrey. The NDP cancelling that bridge project just exacerbates the issue.


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#58 Mike K.

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Posted 19 November 2017 - 08:31 AM

True. The port authority is also trying to figure out what to do about cruise ships not fitting under the Lions Gate.

We’ve (yyj) got a real opportunity here so long as they can’t accommodate the big ships.

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#59 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 19 November 2017 - 08:33 AM

^No one said supply chains where intelligent now, did they. 

 

Well, built from scratch they are.  But we did not build this continent from scratch, so it's been pieced together, like the electric grid has been.


<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#60 Bingo

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Posted 19 November 2017 - 11:44 AM

Related to all this is the issue of the George Massey tunnel. It prevents larger ships from just heading up river and unloading in New West or Surrey. The NDP cancelling that bridge project just exacerbates the issue.

 

Going up the river is slow and old fashioned. 

 

The Port of Prince Rupert enjoys significant competitive advantages over other west coast ports.

Shortest Trade Route Between North America and Asia's fast growing economies.
The Port of Prince Rupert is North America's closest port to key Asian markets by up to three days - it's 36 hours closer to Shanghai than Vancouver and over 68 hours closer than Los Angeles.

Our strategic location and growing trade capacity gives shippers a powerful competitive edge in the global economy.

One of the deepest natural harbours in North America 
The Port of Prince Rupert has one of the deepest natural harbours in the world and the deepest inner harbour entrance of any of our competitors.

With a channel depth of 35 metres and terminal berths of 17 metres, the Port is capable of handling the largest vessels deployed in transpacific trade.

http://legacy.rupert...rade/advantages

 



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