Jump to content

      














Photo

AirBnB, VRBO, vacation and executive rental news and issues in Victoria


  • Please log in to reply
1350 replies to this topic

#21 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Suspended User
  • 52,121 posts

Posted 17 July 2015 - 05:53 AM

I don't think it's a serious issue affecting our vacancy rate.  YES, it's affecting hotel rentals, of course it is.  But that effect is minimal.

 

If anything, those few condos that are being used as Air Bnb would not have sold in the first place, if the purchaser did not have the Air BNB option.


<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#22 Coreyburger

Coreyburger
  • Member
  • 2,862 posts

Posted 17 July 2015 - 06:08 AM

True, but that doesn't tell the full story. As for the hotels, it is actually a bad thing if they are pulling people of hotels because of hotel tax. That tax pays for the very tourism marketing that AirBNB requires to exist, so they are crapping in their own bed and expecting us to deal with it (much like Uber, etc.)



#23 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Suspended User
  • 52,121 posts

Posted 17 July 2015 - 06:13 AM

True, but that doesn't tell the full story. As for the hotels, it is actually a bad thing if they are pulling people of hotels because of hotel tax. That tax pays for the very tourism marketing that AirBNB requires to exist, so they are crapping in their own bed and expecting us to deal with it (much like Uber, etc.)

 

That sort of cuts both ways though.  Car rental companies pay no tourism tax, and they benefit from tourism marketing.  And Air BNB brings customers to restaurants and attractions, that also pay no tourism marketing money.  (These companies can voluntarily be TV members, and many do).

 

Maybe the hotel tax is not the best way to raise the money for TV.

 

Anyway, the City ought to be wary of the wrong way to try to regulate.


  • sebberry likes this
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#24 sebberry

sebberry

    Resident Housekeeper

  • Moderator
  • 18,597 posts
  • LocationVictoria

Posted 17 July 2015 - 07:44 AM

And there are very few. It's not an issue at all as far as housing is concerned.

 

But if you're Councillor Loveday, just a tiny fraction being used for Air BnB rentals has a significant impact on the rental market!


Victoria current weather by neighbourhood: Victoria school-based weather station network

Victoria webcams: Big Wave Dave Webcams

 


#25 lanforod

lanforod
  • Member
  • 7,415 posts
  • LocationSaanich

Posted 17 July 2015 - 07:50 AM

Yeah, I don't think AirBnB, VRBO, Flipkey, and HomeAway combined are taking more than 10* condos off the rental market. But certainly, they are affecting the hotel market. Should we do something about it? Nah.

 

Uber vs taxi's is a bit different.

 

 

*VHF Stat


Edited by lanforod, 17 July 2015 - 07:51 AM.


#26 Mr Cook Street

Mr Cook Street
  • Member
  • 936 posts

Posted 17 July 2015 - 07:56 AM

Methinks it would be fairly easy to encourage vacation property owners to register and either pay a flat annual rate, or, a tax for every night they are booked. Pretty easy to see who is renting out their places by doing a quick search online. Make the fee relatively affordable and the penalty for not registering punitive to encourage registration.



#27 lanforod

lanforod
  • Member
  • 7,415 posts
  • LocationSaanich

Posted 17 July 2015 - 08:03 AM

Why though? Is it worth it - it'll likely cost more to administer than the money you bring in.



#28 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Suspended User
  • 52,121 posts

Posted 17 July 2015 - 08:03 AM

Methinks it would be fairly easy to encourage vacation property owners to register and either pay a flat annual rate, or, a tax for every night they are booked. Pretty easy to see who is renting out their places by doing a quick search online. Make the fee relatively affordable and the penalty for not registering punitive to encourage registration.

 

It sounds easy, but likely to create a whole new level of bureaucracy, for the latter part.


<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#29 Mr Cook Street

Mr Cook Street
  • Member
  • 936 posts

Posted 17 July 2015 - 08:07 AM

That is a good point.



#30 Mike K.

Mike K.
  • Administrator
  • 53,163 posts

Posted 17 July 2015 - 08:09 AM

These units can be a big money maker. Why not apply a commercial mill rate for them?

Know it all.
Citified.ca is Victoria's most comprehensive research resource for new-build homes and commercial spaces.


#31 lanforod

lanforod
  • Member
  • 7,415 posts
  • LocationSaanich

Posted 17 July 2015 - 08:11 AM

These units can be a big money maker. Why not apply a commercial mill rate for them?

 

Do you want to do the same for long term rentals - ie. secondary suites?



#32 lanforod

lanforod
  • Member
  • 7,415 posts
  • LocationSaanich

Posted 17 July 2015 - 08:12 AM

We don't want to tax people twice. The income is already taxed as income...



#33 Mike K.

Mike K.
  • Administrator
  • 53,163 posts

Posted 17 July 2015 - 08:16 AM

The two are completely different things, I'd say. A long term rental is not affecting an industry that has a large daily vacancy. If it weren't for private rentals, we'd be in serious trouble in this region.

That being said homes with legal secondary suites already pay higher taxes as a result of the added value of a legal suite.

Know it all.
Citified.ca is Victoria's most comprehensive research resource for new-build homes and commercial spaces.


#34 sebberry

sebberry

    Resident Housekeeper

  • Moderator
  • 18,597 posts
  • LocationVictoria

Posted 17 July 2015 - 08:29 AM

That being said homes with legal secondary suites already pay higher taxes as a result of the added value of a legal suite.

 

Don't forget the nightmare owners often face in order to bring their suite up to code, leaving many to simply not bother.  That alone has to have a measurable impact on vacancy rates.  There's a lot of musty basements in town that could be upgraded to perfectly suitable housing if the city simply stopped insisting the entire house be raised 4".


Victoria current weather by neighbourhood: Victoria school-based weather station network

Victoria webcams: Big Wave Dave Webcams

 


#35 spanky123

spanky123
  • Member
  • 11,983 posts

Posted 17 July 2015 - 11:15 AM

The main issues that most municipalities face with Airbnb and others is the issue of short term rentals. If you were to rent your place out with Airbnb for months at a time then nobody would have a problem with that. It is the daily rentals that not only impact hotels and hotel tax but neighbours as well. If I owned a condo downtown then I wouldn't be happy to have the units next door being used by daily renters who where there to party and cared less about the premises.

#36 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Suspended User
  • 52,121 posts

Posted 17 July 2015 - 11:17 AM

The main issues that most municipalities face with Airbnb and others is the issue of short term rentals. If you were to rent your place out with Airbnb for months at a time then nobody would have a problem with that. It is the daily rentals that not only impact hotels and hotel tax but neighbours as well. If I owned a condo downtown then I wouldn't be happy to have the units next door being used by daily renters who where there to party and cared less about the premises.

 

What business is that of the city though, that particular issue?  That's your building issue.

 

What issue does the City of Victoria face due to short-term rentals, from their point of view?  Discounting the hotel tax (the city gets none of that, nor does it collect it).


<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#37 Mr Cook Street

Mr Cook Street
  • Member
  • 936 posts

Posted 17 July 2015 - 11:21 AM

My condo has a minimum rental period of 2 months to avoid short term renters.



#38 LeoVictoria

LeoVictoria
  • Member
  • 3,187 posts

Posted 20 May 2016 - 06:01 AM

City of Victoria expecting a staff report on Airbnb June 9

http://www.timescolo...illor-1.2259756

#39 Mike K.

Mike K.
  • Administrator
  • 53,163 posts

Posted 25 May 2016 - 11:22 AM

15 of Victoria’s most unique AirBnB rentals for the perfect house hunting trip or local “staycation”

http://victoria.citi...cal-staycation/

 

Whether you're traveling to Victoria on a house hunting mission or looking for a unique staycation experience close to home, Citified's list of southern Vancouver Island's 15 most unique vacation rentals invites you to experience Victoria like never before.

 

The following listings, displayed in no particular order and available for rent through AirBnB or VRBO, bring together an inspiring mix of breathtaking view properties, idyllic locations and unique architecture that represent the charm and character of British Columbia's capital region. [Full article]


Know it all.
Citified.ca is Victoria's most comprehensive research resource for new-build homes and commercial spaces.


#40 spanky123

spanky123
  • Member
  • 11,983 posts

Posted 08 June 2016 - 11:59 AM

Can't seem to paste any more but there is an article in the TC about Victoria council wanting to regulate airbnb and other home sharing services.

 

I had heard last week that the tourism industry was lobbying Victoria but the proposed regulations seem to go a lot further than I would have expected and in my opinion would have a huge impact on the local industry.

 

I can see forcing airbnb to collect taxes and home owners to either be licensed or have some other sort of insurance in place but directing the assessment authority to tax the properties as commercial would be way to big a burden in my opinion and make home sharing unprofitable for everyone but the largest and most efficient operators.



You're not quite at the end of this discussion topic!

Use the page links at the lower-left to go to the next page to read additional posts.
 



2 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 2 guests, 0 anonymous users