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#41 http

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 05:45 PM

I still question why there is a need to physically "show up" - virtually showing up is far more inclusive.

Except that then you're excluding the ~ 15% of the country without internet access. (line 35, that's us!)


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#42 Rob Randall

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 06:25 PM

That's actually my point. That is poor communication. The significance of the RGS and the impact that it will have on people's lives has not been communicated clearly in plain language and real life examples are not given.  I believe that if people knew the long term implications of the RGS and the ways that it interacts with their everyday life then there would have been a lot more people showing up.


Yeah, but people read that giant document and it starts off saying "keep urban areas compact, limit suburban sprawl, diversify and strengthen the economy, reduce our carbon footprint etc..."

Alright, so that's the objective, eh? So we go, "OK, sounds good. So just do it, already, why is my input needed, seriously?"

What sort of input can an ordinary citizen give? What answers are out there that CRD staff don't already know?

Or is this all just a formality, a way to get a rubber stamp so that bureaucrats can pitch this to politicians knowing the public participation box has been checked off, even if only six people bothered to show up and say something?
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#43 SusanJones

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 06:50 PM

Yeah, but people read that giant document and it starts off saying "keep urban areas compact, limit suburban sprawl, diversify and strengthen the economy, reduce our carbon footprint etc..."

Alright, so that's the objective, eh? So we go, "OK, sounds good. So just do it, already, why is my input needed, seriously?"

What sort of input can an ordinary citizen give? What answers are out there that CRD staff don't already know?

Or is this all just a formality, a way to get a rubber stamp so that bureaucrats can pitch this to politicians knowing the public participation box has been checked off, even if only six people bothered to show up and say something?

Ok, that's fair, add cynicism, little faith in process etc. to list



#44 SusanJones

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 06:53 PM

Except that then you're excluding the ~ 15% of the country without internet access. (line 35, that's us!)

Great point, and perhaps it could be an option in addition to others.



#45 LJ

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 07:02 PM

^ Heck a cup of tea and a biscuit would be enough to get 50% of Victoria's retirees out at a meeting

 


Do 50% of retirees care what the district is going to look like 30 years down the road?


Edited by LJ, 20 October 2016 - 07:02 PM.

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#46 Rob Randall

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Posted 20 October 2016 - 07:22 PM

Ok, that's fair, add cynicism, little faith in process etc. to list


No, that's not it at all. It's not lack of faith in the process, it's that this whole thing is so high-level, so Inside Baseball. You look at the website and you're hit by a firehose of data.

Faith in the process? Heck, I don't even know what my entry point into the process is, or honestly why it's needed. It's confusing and intimidating.

God,I couldn't tell you how many hours I've spent at visioning meetings.
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#47 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 07:19 AM

Wow, I think this editorial was on the right track, but lost it.

 

Give Mike Hicks a gold star. He has come up with a simple, workable solution to the Colwood Crawl. It’s not the only solution and it won’t make everything magically better, but if more widely adopted, it could make the commute from the West Shore measurably more tolerable.

 

Hicks, the Juan de Fuca director on the Capital Regional District board and chairman of the regional parks committee, set off a social-media tempest with his decision to change his committee’s start time to 10 a.m. from 9:30 a.m. so he could avoid the Colwood Crawl.

 

The reactions surprised him.

 

“People are angry,” said Hicks. “I’m getting hate mail and all sorts of stuff. They’re upset with me moving the meeting, thinking it is for my elitism or for personal gain as a politician or whatever. I even got criticized for screwing up the Johnson Street Bridge. It’s been an eye-opener.”

 

Hicks commutes from Sooke to attend meetings at the CRD headquarters on Fisgard Street. Because he drives his 13-year-old son to school, he can’t leave Sooke until 8:30 a.m., which doesn’t leave him time to make a 9:30 a.m. meeting in Victoria and to attend to his duties as committee chairman, such as arriving early to go over documents and agenda items.

 

 

So do all parents that have school-drive commitments just tell their work they must be late each day?  No, they make alternate arrangements.  Hicks only needs to do this once a month, no?  So you drop your kid off early at school, or drop him off at a classmate's home to go in with them etc.  Parents do this all over the CRD every day.  They figure it out.

 

Otherwise, I'm OK with the staggered start times, if it does not muck up other staff schedules.  All we need to do is shift 30% of the traffic out of the two 2-hour rushes and we have the Colwood Crawl solved.


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#48 Mike K.

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 07:27 AM

Staggered start times for the majority of companies and organizations will require an entire social and cultural shift. It will be tremendously disruptive to businesses and further reduce the output of government organizations.

 

Imagine someone calling up an office at 9AM in need of information critical to a decision they are about to make. "Sorry, Billy here won't arrive until 11AM." Now everyone's delayed.

 

Imagine if your grocery store opened at 10AM as opposed to 8AM? Or if a government office called you at 6AM because an employee has opted for an earlier start time? 

 

9-5 is setup for a reason and for the overwhelming majority of the workforce it is structured that way to ensure everyone's operating with at least some even footing throughout the business day.


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#49 Sparky

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 07:32 AM

Our company has 3 employees that live out west.

 

They are able to structure their commute in order to start work on time. They do not have the pleasure privilege of changing their start time. (I think that's why the average working person is ticked off)



#50 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 07:38 AM

Staggered start times for the majority of companies and organizations will require an entire social and cultural shift. It will be tremendously disruptive to businesses and further reduce the output of government organizations.

 

Imagine someone calling up an office at 9AM in need of information critical to a decision they are about to make. "Sorry, Billy here won't arrive until 11AM." Now everyone's delayed.

 

Imagine if your grocery store opened at 10AM as opposed to 8AM? Or if a government office called you at 6AM because an employee has opted for an earlier start time? 

 

9-5 is setup for a reason and for the overwhelming majority of the workforce it is structured that way to ensure everyone's operating with at least some even footing throughout the business day.

 

I agree, that's true for most of the workforce.  And it can also mess with schools too.  But there must be some government functions that can work other hours.  Is there a reason the dockyard has to start at 7am or whenever they start?  Can they not start at 9am?  Or say MSP billing enquiries, why not make it 10am to 4pm and just have employees working straight through.  I dunno.

 

A single-mom that's my good friend works for the federal government, they allow her to arrive at the office an hour later than most of the office, she works the first hour from home.  I'm not sure if it's the same efficiency.


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#51 On the Level

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 08:26 AM

 

 

Isitt’s comments came as Victoria councillors considered two proposed amendments to the Regional Growth Strategy — one redesignating 154 hectares in Metchosin to facilitate an industrial/residential development proposed in partnership with Langford, Metchosin and the Beecher Bay First Nation

 

 

Juan de Fuca director Mike Hicks said there is no discernible sprawl in his area. “We’re already restricted to one hectare parcels. That’s 2 1/2 acres,” Hicks said.

“Sometimes I feel that I’m on a totally different planet from some of the Victoria councillors, let alone in the same region.”

 

So now we have Isitt and helps trying to interfere with everyone else in the region with their nuttiness....  

 

http://www.timescolo...prawl-1.2367053



#52 nagel

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 06:24 PM

Not sure how it's interference when they are acting in their capacity as CRD directors.

#53 Bingo

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 06:40 PM

So now we have Isitt and helps trying to interfere with everyone else in the region with their nuttiness....  

 

http://www.timescolo...prawl-1.2367053

 

Helps also said in that same article...

 

Mayor Lisa Helps said that in taking a strong position on urban containment, the city has to be prepared to be more open to densification.

“I know that’s a really contentious and challenging thing sometimes when maybe higher than usual or denser than usual developments come to us.

But it has to go both ways,” Helps said.

http://www.timescolo...prawl-1.2367053



#54 Nparker

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Posted 21 October 2016 - 06:46 PM

Helps also said in that same article...“I know that’s a really contentious and challenging thing sometimes when maybe higher than usual or denser than usual developments come to us.
But it has to go both ways,” 

Talk is cheap and actions speak louder than words. I'll believe it when I see it.



#55 Coreyburger

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Posted 23 October 2016 - 10:04 AM

Also, 2 1/2 acres is pretty close to the definition of rural sprawl - high enough density to need services but low enough that they are prohibitively expensive to provide.
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#56 rjag

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Posted 21 April 2018 - 08:46 AM

I know this article is about the Vancouver equivalent of the CRD, but heres some more of the entitlements afforded to staff

 

http://theprovince.c...arking#comments

 

 

 

Garrick Jay is an Interfor sales manager who works at the Metrotown office complex in Burnaby.

Paying that $150 a month to park is painful enough. But the pain became agonizing when he heard municipal employees of Metro Vancouver pay just $75 a month to park in the same lot.

“I think the municipal government and their employees have lost touch with reality,” Jay told me. “And aren’t they supposed to be encouraging public transit and discouraging car use?”

 

Yes, indeed. In fact, Metro Vancouver is preparing to wallop Lower Mainland drivers with new “mobility pricing” tolls to pay for expanded transit service.

But even though the Metrotown SkyTrain station is right across the street from Metro’s municipal headquarters, their staff get half-price parking!

Even worse: Metro Vancouver senior managers pocket $972 a month for an “automobile allowance.”

Talk about a prime case of “Do as we say, not as we do.”



#57 splashflash

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Posted 14 November 2018 - 02:17 PM

New chairperson of the CRD elected yet? Meeting started at 1:00 pm

#58 nagel

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Posted 14 November 2018 - 02:27 PM

Plant



#59 splashflash

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Posted 14 November 2018 - 03:29 PM

Thanks.

https://www.sookenew...as-board-chair/

 



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