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Solar water heater SFD installation


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#1 Mike K.

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 05:45 PM

The senior K's are installing a solar water heater similar to the one pictured here. The pipes get quite hot, even in the winter, and will greatly reduce the need for expending energy to keep the water tank hot 24 hours a day. The installation measures 6' tall, 5'3" x 5'3" wide and is positioned about 10 feet off the ground on the second floor where it will receive full south and west exposure.

 

Next year they'll be installing about 20x 100W solar panels on the roof. That will bring in enough power in the summer months to completely get off the grid, even sell power back to BC Hydro. Calculating it out, the solar panel installation will pay for itself within 2-3 years. This sort of stuff blows my mind and I can't wait to see how the water heater works out.

 

water-heater.jpg

 

 

Two_pipe_Inlet-outlet_Solar_Water_Heater

 

 


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#2 pherthyl

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 06:38 PM

PV Solar panel payback is around 10-15 years here last time I calculated it. What are the assumptions that lead to a 2-3 year payback?

#3 Mike K.

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 07:01 PM

How did you get 10-15 years, and why such a massive variance?

 

In this case low annual consumption, plus a significantly reduced electrical bill with the solar water heater, coupled with the ability to install the system without having to hire any labour affords a major cost savings. The entire installation will be approximately $2,000 inclusive of all materials.


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#4 lanforod

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 08:21 PM

How does low annual consumption or the water heater saving on electricity have any effect on the solar panel install paying off?

 

The water heater saving on electricity is a seperate savings to solar power.



#5 pherthyl

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 08:28 PM

How did you get 10-15 years, and why such a massive variance?

 

In this case low annual consumption, plus a significantly reduced electrical bill with the solar water heater, coupled with the ability to install the system without having to hire any labour affords a major cost savings. The entire installation will be approximately $2,000 inclusive of all materials.

 

I thought you meant the 2-3 year payback referred to the solar photovoltaic panels.  The hot water panels have a shorter payback, 2-3 years sounds about right.  CRD were offering rebates on those installs up until mid this year, but only when professionally installed so it wasn't so worth it for DIYers.

 

 

My parents have the solar hot water panel and have had it for the last 10 years.  DIY install and the panel at the time was $800 so total cost was about $1000.  Works great, especially since their hot water is exclusively heated by wood stove otherwise so all summer it prevents having to build a fire in the morning.


Edited by pherthyl, 23 September 2015 - 08:32 PM.


#6 Mike K.

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 08:37 PM

How does low annual consumption or the water heater saving on electricity have any effect on the solar panel install paying off?

 

The water heater saving on electricity is a seperate savings to solar power.

 

Net metering, so when you're producing excess electricity you're banking it for when you need it, or BCH will pay you out the difference at the end of the year. I'm not well versed on the details of that program, though.

 

I thought you meant the 2-3 year payback referred to the solar photovoltaic panels.  The hot water panels have a shorter payback, 2-3 years sounds about right.  CRD were offering rebates on those installs up until mid this year, but only when professionally installed so it wasn't so worth it for DIYers.

 

 

My parents have the solar hot water panel and have had it for the last 10 years.  Works great, especially since their hot water is exclusively heated by wood stove otherwise so all summer it prevents having to build a fire in the morning.

 

I'll try to get more details, but yeah, however it was calculated the pay-back period was estimated at 2-3 years. Maybe that's too optimistic, but I think the calculations have been fairly thorough. There's a village of 50- and 60-somethings hanging around and figuring this stuff out. They live for these sorts of projects.


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#7 spanky123

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Posted 24 September 2015 - 05:48 AM

In Victoria, solar electric power rarely covers the full costs of installation and maintenance. You get an average 5.8 hours of sunlight a day in Victoria with about an 80% efficiency (ie not all hours are direct on your panels). You would generate about $1.10 of electricity a day at current hydro rates or about $400 a year. 10 PV panels may cost $2K but then you will need to pay an electrician to wire it into your building and purchase the proper electrical equipment. Probably closer to $3K - $5K when all said and done. When you consider the present value of money and basic maintenance the payback is 10-15 years.



#8 pherthyl

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Posted 24 September 2015 - 06:08 AM

In Victoria, solar electric power rarely covers the full costs of installation and maintenance. You get an average 5.8 hours of sunlight a day in Victoria with about an 80% efficiency (ie not all hours are direct on your panels). You would generate about $1.10 of electricity a day at current hydro rates or about $400 a year. 10 PV panels may cost $2K but then you will need to pay an electrician to wire it into your building and purchase the proper electrical equipment. Probably closer to $3K - $5K when all said and done. When you consider the present value of money and basic maintenance the payback is 10-15 years.


Some estimates from the group buy guys out in Cowichan are that the internal rate of return of a solar install is about 1.6 to 2%. Positive, but there are better things to do with your money at the moment.

However prices have declined spectacularly, so within a few years it will very likely be a good investment to go for PVs in Victoria.

#9 Mike K.

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Posted 24 September 2015 - 08:31 AM

In Victoria, solar electric power rarely covers the full costs of installation and maintenance. You get an average 5.8 hours of sunlight a day in Victoria with about an 80% efficiency (ie not all hours are direct on your panels). You would generate about $1.10 of electricity a day at current hydro rates or about $400 a year. 10 PV panels may cost $2K but then you will need to pay an electrician to wire it into your building and purchase the proper electrical equipment. Probably closer to $3K - $5K when all said and done. When you consider the present value of money and basic maintenance the payback is 10-15 years.

 

There is no need to hire labour, it'll all be done in-house. Friends in high places ;)

 

All of the electrical equipment has already been secured and was used for other things. Now it'll be used at the house, no need to buy anything new.

 

Besides, it's $2,000. If it flops it's not like $40k was invested into the scheme.

 

I'll keep everyone posted on how things progress :)


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#10 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 09 May 2018 - 11:44 AM

 
California regulators approve plan to mandate solar panels on new home construction
 
MORE:
 
California regulators Wednesday approved a historic plan to mandate rooftop solar panels on most new single-family homes built in the state.
 
The California Energy Commission's action is expected to add on average about $9,500 to the cost of building new houses.
 
The solar mandate, which goes into effect in 2020, received the support of homebuilder and solar trade associations as well as several large utilities.
 

 

 

<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

 



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