Jump to content

      













Photo

December 2018 - The 2019 World Juniors in Vancouver & Victoria


  • Please log in to reply
35 replies to this topic

#21 shoeflack

shoeflack
  • Member
  • 1,252 posts

Posted 11 May 2018 - 03:15 PM

It did need a few dozen volunteers. But it was a small budget event. The World Juniors is bringing in msssive ticket revenue and TV and sponsorship money. While paying the players next to nothing.

Ticket sales alone are $350,000 per game here.

The City, DVBA and TV kicked in $220,000 together.

 

Ok, so why did we have volunteers in 1994 or 2010? Or what about the 2007 FIFA U-20s?

 

In my time in major events, I've noticed that budget and volunteer requirement really don't have much of a correlation.

 

That's why the Highland Games and Rifflandia, both events with very different budgets, require similar volunteer numbers. Or why the Olympics requires a small city of volunteers.



#22 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Suspended User
  • 52,121 posts

Posted 11 May 2018 - 03:26 PM

Well I think because in 1994 you have all kinds of venues that are not normally major sports venues and logistics etc.

U-20 thing was a huger crowd not normally fitting into RAP.

This coming set of hockey games is just the same as a set of sold out Royals games, apart from more media and TV.

Quite frankly I don’t see how the economic impact is much higher than a set of two sold out Elton John concerts here. Taxpayers did not kick in $220,000 for those.

The WJs is a massive revenue source for Hockey Canada (30% of their annual revenue), a private for-profit organization.

Edited by VicHockeyFan, 11 May 2018 - 03:33 PM.

<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#23 shoeflack

shoeflack
  • Member
  • 1,252 posts

Posted 11 May 2018 - 03:40 PM

Well I think because in 1994 you have all kinds of venues that are not normally major sports venues and logistics etc.

U-20 thing was a huger crowd not normally fitting into RAP.

This coming set of hockey games is just the same as a set of sold out Royals games, apart from more media and TV.

Quite frankly I don’t see how the economic impact is much higher than a set of two sold out Elton John concerts here. Taxpayers did not kick in $220,000 for those.

The WJs is a massive revenue source for Hockey Canada, a private for-profit organization.

 

For one, Hockey Canada is a registered not-for-profit. They don't have shareholders they're paying out.

 

This tournament is not the same as some sold out Royals games. First, the Royals don't play two games a day for six straight days. A regular Royals game doesn't require practice venues for 5 teams in the lead up and on off days. It doesn't require unique transportation services for teams, officials, and dignitaries. It doesn't generally require a dedicated fan zone such as what is being planned here. It doesn't require the handling of the world's hockey media and all that comes with that. It doesn't require far more intensive pre- and post-game ceremonies. Shall I go on?

 

You're focused on game operations, which is pretty cut and dry (like a Royals game on steroids maybe). What you're not considering is that events like this are generally far more intensive in the stuff outside of the games themselves.

 

You're right, the World Juniors are a massive source of revenue for them, but if you're saying this event doesn't need volunteers, you couldn't be more wrong.



#24 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Suspended User
  • 52,121 posts

Posted 11 May 2018 - 03:44 PM

You might be mistaking the Vancouver WJ games with ours. The WJs are not followed by media or fans outside of Canada, and to an extremely lesser degree, in the US.

Make no mistake, our TV networks have done a tremendous job of hyping the event to Canadians.

The Hockey Canada **Foundation is a non-profit. The parent, or main entity is not.

Edited by VicHockeyFan, 11 May 2018 - 03:46 PM.

<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#25 shoeflack

shoeflack
  • Member
  • 1,252 posts

Posted 11 May 2018 - 03:50 PM

You might be mistaking the Vancouver WJ games with ours. The WJs are not followed by media or fans outside of Canada, and to an extremely lesser degree, in the US.

Make no mistake, our TV networks have done a tremendous job of hyping the event to Canadians.

 

I am well aware of who is playing here, and I understand the brand that is the WJC in Canada. But it's not just Canadian media that covers the event. And even within that, TSN will have a crew at each game in Victoria. As will the NHL Network for the American games. Finland and Sweden have broadcast partners as well. This isn't just a CHL on Sportsnet type coverage.

 

But again, supporting the media is a small fraction of the volunteer need.


Edited by shoeflack, 11 May 2018 - 03:50 PM.


#26 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Suspended User
  • 52,121 posts

Posted 11 May 2018 - 03:54 PM

The event, despite having all these World teams represented is held every second year in Canada because other countries have no fan or media interest. And when it’s held in the US, they only host at cities close to the border because they need Canadian fans to go to games.
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#27 shoeflack

shoeflack
  • Member
  • 1,252 posts

Posted 11 May 2018 - 03:55 PM

You might be mistaking the Vancouver WJ games with ours. The WJs are not followed by media or fans outside of Canada, and to an extremely lesser degree, in the US.

Make no mistake, our TV networks have done a tremendous job of hyping the event to Canadians.

The Hockey Canada **Foundation is a non-profit. The parent, or main entity is not.

 

Again, you're wrong here. The Hockey Canada Foundation is a registered charity with a CRA number. Hockey Canada is a not-for-profit organization led by a volunteer Board of Directors.

 

All NSOs (National Sport Organizations) in Canada are required by Sport Canada to be not-for-profit organizations.



#28 shoeflack

shoeflack
  • Member
  • 1,252 posts

Posted 11 May 2018 - 03:57 PM

The event, despite having all these World teams represented is held every second year in Canada because other countries have no fan or media interest. And when it’s held in the US, they only host at cities close to the border because they need Canadian fans to go to games.

 

Not arguing with you here. That's a plain fact. But all this point does is reinforce why so many volunteers are needed. It's an extremely high profile and popular event in Canada, like you say.



#29 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Suspended User
  • 52,121 posts

Posted 11 May 2018 - 03:58 PM

I might be confused about charity vs. Non-profit.

Hockey Canada does get $3.5M in taxpayer money.

Skiing gets double and swimming $1.5M more.

Edited by VicHockeyFan, 11 May 2018 - 03:59 PM.

<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#30 shoeflack

shoeflack
  • Member
  • 1,252 posts

Posted 11 May 2018 - 04:00 PM

I might be confused about charity vs. Non-profit.

 

Here's a good breakdown below. Hockey Canada definitely exists with the goal of making money (and they are very good at it), but their revenues are re-invested into their own organization and to the provincial bodies (i.e.: BC Hockey) as opposed of going to shareholders (of which they have none).

 

https://www.canada.c...ganization.html



#31 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Suspended User
  • 52,121 posts

Posted 11 May 2018 - 04:05 PM

I dare to think that our Pacific Cup old timers tournament each year might be a better spin-off economic generator if you exclude arena game-time staffing at the WJ here.
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#32 shoeflack

shoeflack
  • Member
  • 1,252 posts

Posted 11 May 2018 - 04:10 PM

Hockey Canada does get $3.5M in taxpayer money.

Skiing gets double and swimming $1.5M more.

 

The federal government through Sport Canada and its Sport Funding and Accountability Framework has a specific formula for how much dollars go to each NSO. Own the Podium is the federal program that ultimately oversees this all. It all comes down to international success and medal counts. So successful individual sports will always be funded higher than successful team sports. So for instance, in the last quadrennial, Rowing was the highest funded summer sport at $17.5 million and Freestyle skiing was the highest funded winter sport at $15 million.

 

Here are the winter numbers vs the summer numbers.


  • VicHockeyFan likes this

#33 shoeflack

shoeflack
  • Member
  • 1,252 posts

Posted 11 May 2018 - 04:18 PM

I dare to think that our Pacific Cup old timers tournament each year might be a better spin-off economic generator if you exclude arena game-time staffing at the WJ here.

 

I don't doubt this either. Low cost heads-in-beds type events are very good for the local economy, but they generally don't bring as much national or international spotlight as higher cost events.

 

That's why SportHost Victoria and Tourism Victoria went out and hired Keith Wells to head the sport tourism initiative. It's a widespread mandate. You can't solely rely on low impact head-in-beds type events or you won't get that larger exposure that leads to higher dollar investment in the City that Tourism is after. So sometimes it means spending more money on a higher profile event that will net a smaller direct economic impact than a beer league tourney, because that event will ultimately (or so is the hope) result in higher indirect economic impact. But the idea is to have a good mix of both types of events.



#34 VicHockeyFan

VicHockeyFan
  • Suspended User
  • 52,121 posts

Posted 11 May 2018 - 04:21 PM

I agree with that statement. It’s just with all things Tourusm Victoria related it’s hard to quantify the return.
  • shoeflack likes this
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#35 jeffifah

jeffifah
  • Member
  • 20 posts

Posted 03 August 2018 - 09:53 AM



#36 jeffifah

jeffifah
  • Member
  • 20 posts

Posted 03 August 2018 - 09:55 AM

I agree with that statement. It’s just with all things Tourusm Victoria related it’s hard to quantify the return.

Does anyone have a lead for single game tickets for IIHF tournament? I'm looking to buy two seats for a few of the games, but didn't want to buy the whole package.  thx



 



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


To advertise on VibrantVictoria, call us at 250-884-0589.