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Journalism, Online Media and Freedom of the Press.


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#21 Wayne

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 07:41 AM

Trump pardons Conrad Black.

 

 

http://www.msn.com/e...p5&ocid=DELLDHP



#22 lanforod

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 07:44 AM

Surely you’ve m heard of a takedown before? It’s the same thing as taken down. Dust got the right meaning, as in a takedown/taken down is an apprehension/arrest.

 

Maybe I read the article differently, but I didn't read anywhere that the journalist was arrested or apprehended. Only that his place was forcibly searched and his data taken.



#23 Mike K.

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 08:01 AM

He doesn’t have to be arrested to be taken down.

Why is this so difficult? Do I need to list the 500 different forms of interaction/outcome where police forcibly engage with a civilian? :)

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#24 Rob Randall

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 08:29 AM

If they had killed the journalist, I would have said he'd have been shot and killed, not taken down at gunpoint.

 

Taken down at gunpoint is a common phrase referring to police subduing someone with their guns drawn, and the CBC agrees.

 

"Taken down" in this context implies forcible restraint was used. From everything I've read he was simply handcuffed and was not resisting. When describing situations like this it's best to avoid ambiguous and misleading terms.


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#25 Mike K.

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 08:42 AM

No it doesn’t.

A police take down only results in force against the person if they resist.

His home was raided. Battering ram. Guns drawn. All that stuff. What happens to the target when police pursue their take down is up to the target. But the intent of the action is to shock and induce compliance/submission without resorting to physical harm.

But when a dozen officers returned to his home on Friday, this time their guns were drawn and they came equipped with a search warrant, a sledgehammer and a battering ram.

In an interview Monday, as concern spread among journalists and civil rights activists about his treatment, Mr. Carmody said his wrists were still sore from being handcuffed for six hours while the police raided his house and seized laptops, phones and hard drives — including all the images and documents he had archived from his 29-year career as a reporter and cameraman.


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#26 Mike K.

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 08:47 AM

Have you guys never watched an episode of Cops? 48 Hours? To Serve and Protect?

Police don’t use any physical force during takedowns unless it is absolutely required or justified. If the suspect doesn’t resist, but they get physically injured by police, that’s called assault, and it opens up a whole ‘nother can of worms cops want nothing to do with.

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#27 Benezet

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 11:42 AM

Have you guys never watched an episode of Cops? 48 Hours? To Serve and Protect?...


No, but I did see Serpico...
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#28 lanforod

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 12:04 PM

Just having this conversation implies that your wording is questionable, Mike. You don't want people wondering what you meant when you're trying to describe the facts.

 

Obviously, you're turning a blind eye to our feedback, and that's your prerogative... but man, can't you take a little constructive criticism? That's all it was.



#29 Mike K.

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Posted 16 May 2019 - 12:31 PM

You likened it to the spread of fake news. Anyone would take issue with someone misunderstanding a commonly used term for exactly the situation as described, and alleging its use is deceitful.

I stand by every word I wrote, but it’s all good though, no harm done, and I’m glad we had the conversation.

But the wording is hardly the issue. The issue is a police raid on a journalist who refused to reveal a source. This is no small matter, and one of the most serious North overreaches (in my opinion) observed regarding a journalist.
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