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Irish Times Pub | Victoria | Government St.


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#21 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 13 January 2018 - 03:30 PM

I'll be collecting my second stamp today.

 

26239070_2372649542748755_50865946278601


Edited by VicHockeyFan, 13 January 2018 - 03:33 PM.

<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#22 phx

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Posted 13 January 2018 - 06:30 PM

 

Yup, under federal jurisdiction. There's even an online tool to file complaints on the "Measurement Canada" webpage. 

  • A pint contains 20 fl oz (568 ml) in Canada.
  • The limit of error for 20 fl oz is 0.5 fl oz (the foam (head) is not included in the measurement).

 

 

I wonder if we could find a lawyer for a class-action lawsuit...



#23 johnk

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Posted 14 January 2018 - 05:24 PM

I wonder if we could find a lawyer for a class-action lawsuit...


I've paid for maybe 5000 "pints" in Victoria but drank only about 4000 pints.
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#24 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 16 March 2020 - 04:46 PM

screenshot-www.facebook.com-2020.03.16-20_43_28.png

 

 


#25 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 06 October 2020 - 10:26 AM

Matt MacNeil, who owns the Irish Times Pub and the Bard & Banker on Government, said the flexible patio policy made a big difference to his businesses over the summer.

 

“I can’t imagine how difficult it would have been had we not been able to be outside in the numbers that they gave us,” he said. “So we’re all grateful for that.”

 

MacNeil said he’s looking to keep his patios in operation over the winter by creating greenhouse-type structures with removable glass panels to allow for air flow on nice days.

 

But he agrees with Walker on the need to reopen Government to northbound traffic, which will allow cabs to pick up and drop off people in rainy weather.

 

“I think that they can still maintain that pedestrian feeling and have one lane going north,” he said. “I think it’s just the wise thing to do — for deliveries, for all the retailers in the mall and everything else.

 

https://www.timescol...dvba-1.24215773


Edited by Victoria Watcher, 06 October 2020 - 10:27 AM.


#26 LJ

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Posted 06 October 2020 - 07:54 PM

If you have greenhouse like structures is it not like eating indoors?

 

Is this just for the extra space it gives them?

 

It will be fun watching the condensation dripping into your food.


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Life's a journey......so roll down the window and enjoy the breeze.

#27 FogPub

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 12:52 AM

It will be fun watching the condensation dripping into your food.

And the rain.  I mean, what greenhouse anywhere doesn't leak like a sieve... :)



#28 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 01:05 AM

PEOPLE MIGHT OVERESTIMATE THE APPEAL OF DINING OUTDOORS WHEN IT'S COLD RAINY WINDY AND DARK OUTSIDE. 

 

THAT'S KIND OF WHEN YOU LIKE THE COSY INTERIOR OF A WARM BAR OR PUB.


Edited by Victoria Watcher, 07 October 2020 - 01:05 AM.


#29 Spy Black

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 05:41 AM

They'll be waterproof, and they'll have heat ... which will negate condensation.

It's all about the distancing from one table to the next, which perpetuates the ability to stay open.

 

All this is about for food and beverage establishments that can afford it, is surviving long enough without having to shut down such that they can once again enjoy the profits of running a successful establishment when things return to normal.

 

Nobody (Irish and Bard noted above are typical) wants to give up their prime location lease, and give up the dollars made hand over fist during normal times ... and thus major food and beverage establishments are simply looking to survive by either breaking even, or suffering an affordable loss ... such that they can return to financial glory when times are good.

 

The only caveat I have is that the City of Victoria have nothing to do with the ongoing design of this pandemic streetscape. Looking at the mist-mash-mess on Broad Street in the Pags block, it is obvious that the COV couldn't design its way out of a paper bag.



#30 aastra

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 07:23 AM

 

If you have greenhouse like structures is it not like eating indoors?

 

Eventually every place will have two places, just to be safe.



#31 Jackerbie

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 08:53 AM

They'll be waterproof, and they'll have heat ... which will negate condensation.

It's all about the distancing from one table to the next, which perpetuates the ability to stay open.

 

All this is about for food and beverage establishments that can afford it, is surviving long enough without having to shut down such that they can once again enjoy the profits of running a successful establishment when things return to normal.

 

Nobody (Irish and Bard noted above are typical) wants to give up their prime location lease, and give up the dollars made hand over fist during normal times ... and thus major food and beverage establishments are simply looking to survive by either breaking even, or suffering an affordable loss ... such that they can return to financial glory when times are good.

 

The only caveat I have is that the City of Victoria have nothing to do with the ongoing design of this pandemic streetscape. Looking at the mist-mash-mess on Broad Street in the Pags block, it is obvious that the COV couldn't design its way out of a paper bag.

 

Broad Street design was led by Cascadia Architecture, build by Hansenbuilt, and coordinated by the Greater Victoria Placemaking Network. COV just kicked in the cash for it all.



#32 Matt R.

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 08:54 AM

They'll be waterproof, and they'll have heat ... which will negate condensation.
It's all about the distancing from one table to the next, which perpetuates the ability to stay open.


There is no reason why they are not able to operate as normal with their normal pre COVID occupancy. The idea of sitting outside is due to the perceived safety of being outdoors in the fresh air. If places start seating tables inside a greenhouse, how is that different than sitting inside?

Matt.

#33 aastra

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 09:43 AM

You're asking how sitting inside would be any different from sitting inside? Because 2020.


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#34 todd

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 10:01 AM

Hard liquor generally warms you up.

#35 Nparker

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 10:33 AM

Hard liquor generally warms you up.

But only until 10:00 PM



#36 todd

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 10:37 AM

But only until 10:00 PM

If you do it right late into the next morning.

#37 Spy Black

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 01:07 PM

There is no reason why they are not able to operate as normal with their normal pre COVID occupancy. The idea of sitting outside is due to the perceived safety of being outdoors in the fresh air. If places start seating tables inside a greenhouse, how is that different than sitting inside?

I don't get what you're saying here Matt?

 

These structures are going up this winter, when we're still solidly in the middle of the COVID crisis, and distancing between tables that is now mandated by law negates any possibility that any restaurant or bar could have anything near the same occupancy numbers they would have in normal times.

These outside structures essentially double the number of tables that can be used ... thus allowing the restaurant to stay open and either break even, eat an affordable loss ... or (in a perfect world) even operate at a small profit until things return to normal.


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#38 Matt R.

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 01:54 PM

I don't get what you're saying here Matt?

These structures are going up this winter, when we're still solidly in the middle of the COVID crisis, and distancing between tables that is now mandated by law negates any possibility that any restaurant or bar could have anything near the same occupancy numbers they would have in normal times.
These outside structures essentially double the number of tables that can be used ... thus allowing the restaurant to stay open and either break even, eat an affordable loss ... or (in a perfect world) even operate at a small profit until things return to normal.

The 2m rule is gone now if you can provide a barrier. There’s no reason they can’t install barriers inside and go back to regular seating - up to groups of six, no wandering, no self serve bar, no mingling - but that all applies to outdoor seating as well.


What’s the difference between sitting inside the pub or outside the pub in a greenhouse?

Matt.

Edited by Matt R., 07 October 2020 - 02:00 PM.


#39 Spy Black

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Posted 07 October 2020 - 02:20 PM

Ahhh, gotcha.

 

I wonder if some of the seating in a complex floor and table layout (like, for example, Irish Times) simply can't accommodate Plexiglas barriers?

I guess you could ask the same question about bar seating, where chairs are typically quite tight and side by side.

 

I hear through the grapevine that a number of the larger establishments that typically sell a large quantity of food and liquor are actually making a small profit with the outside seating, and are really just trying to bide their time until things are back to normal.

That same grapevine has noted that, if they lose their outside seating, they would have to reduce their typical inside seating such that their current small profit would quite quickly turn into a noticeable financial loss.

 

My "grapevine" however, is a bartender and a longtime waitress in a couple of the larger downtown establishments ... so I take it with a grain of salt, as it's likely mostly staff chatter rather than hard facts from owners or senior management,.

 

 



 



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