Jump to content

      












Photo

The More Victoria Changes, the More It Stays the Same...


  • Please log in to reply
538 replies to this topic

#461 aastra

aastra
  • Member
  • 16,953 posts

Posted 08 September 2020 - 11:23 AM

Let's just say the CoV has demonstrated curious priorities re: the things it does and does not crack down upon. And police resources tend to be non-existent for serious things but abundant for trivial things:

 

 

Daily Colonist
August 10, 1965

City Hall Tough on Park Parking

 

Asks for Enforcement

If people won't walk 200 yards to see a ball game, aldermen aren't much interested in increasing parking space around the softball diamond in Beacon Hill Park.

Furthermore, they have ordered police to enforce parking prohibitions so that the ever-encroaching wave of automobiles will not damage the trees and grass in one of the city's beauty spots.

A spokesman for the Victoria Senior Men's Open Softball League pointed out that big crowds attended the games at the park, many of them senior citizens.

NOT FAIR

It was not fair to make them walk as far as they now had to see the play.

...parks superintendent Clifford Bate had another story. A survey was made, he said, and it showed that no spectator had to park more than 200 yards away from the ball diamond.

"The whole trouble these days is that no one wants to walk more than a few feet," said Ald. Cecil Parrott.

CUT DOWN PARKING

"The whole idea over the years has been to cut down parking in Beacon Hill Park, not increase it," said Ald. Geoffrey Edgelow.

Mr. Bate added that boulevard and trees were being damaged on Heywood Avenue now by parking, and police were not enforcing restrictions.



#462 Nparker

Nparker
  • Member
  • 27,870 posts

Posted 08 September 2020 - 11:23 AM

So if I understand these articles correctly, dangers to children in BHP have existed long enough to be considered heritage and therefore Council's current laissez-faire attitude towards juvenile security in the park is simply historical preservation??


  • aastra likes this

#463 aastra

aastra
  • Member
  • 16,953 posts

Posted 08 September 2020 - 11:24 AM

You jumped the gun on me. See the parking article above for the point I'm making here.



#464 aastra

aastra
  • Member
  • 16,953 posts

Posted 08 September 2020 - 11:26 AM

In 1963:

 

 

Why can't we hire five or ten men to patrol Beacon Hill Park? Surely our children are worth as much as a civic fountain? Or underground wiring? Or flower baskets?

 

In 1965:

 

 

...aldermen aren't much interested in increasing parking space around the softball diamond in Beacon Hill Park.

Furthermore, they have ordered police to enforce parking prohibitions


  • todd likes this

#465 aastra

aastra
  • Member
  • 16,953 posts

Posted 08 September 2020 - 11:27 AM

 

So if I understand these articles correctly, dangers to children in BHP have existed long enough to be considered heritage and therefore Council's current laissez-faire attitude towards juvenile security in the park is simply historical preservation??

 

Like I say, they've had some curious priorities re: BHP for many decades running.



#466 aastra

aastra
  • Member
  • 16,953 posts

Posted 09 September 2020 - 07:46 AM

^Those two issues from the 1960s show us the now familiar Victoria script re: policing. You've got a serious criminal issue in the park, so politicians set aside some additional money to hire commissionaires (always has to be additional money, because Vic PD surely doesn't have the budget to respond to... crime). But then later you've got park visitors parking cars where they shouldn't be parking cars, and that issue falls well within the normal and expected responsibilities of the police department.



#467 aastra

aastra
  • Member
  • 16,953 posts

Posted 09 September 2020 - 07:54 AM

Police patrols in the city's largest park shouldn't be regarded as something above and beyond, is my point.


  • todd likes this

#468 Rob Randall

Rob Randall

    C'mon man, cut out the malarkey

  • Member
  • 14,628 posts

Posted 09 September 2020 - 08:26 AM

Because when the park patrols eliminate crime, citizens cry: why are we wasting money on cops in a crime-free park when known criminals are preying on the Downtown and adjoining neighbourhoods.

 

Repeat ad infinitum.


"[Randall's] aesthetic poll was more accurate than his political acumen"

-Tom Hawthorne, Toronto Globe and Mail


#469 aastra

aastra
  • Member
  • 16,953 posts

Posted 09 September 2020 - 08:57 AM

I don't know, that whole "we're wasting money on essential services" thing didn't really gain wider momentum until very recently. Back in the day you never heard anybody claim that city police and fire services were a frill.

 

Remember not too long ago when a mayor of another municipality suggested people weren't getting value for their policing dollar if the community wasn't full of crime? It seemed nutty because we had never heard anything like that before.


  • Nparker likes this

#470 Nparker

Nparker
  • Member
  • 27,870 posts

Posted 09 September 2020 - 09:23 AM

I suppose we're not getting good value for our city parks if they are not full of "campers". Presumably this plays into current decision making.  <_<



#471 Rob Randall

Rob Randall

    C'mon man, cut out the malarkey

  • Member
  • 14,628 posts

Posted 15 September 2020 - 12:10 PM

News flash: Butchart's, RBCM top tourist draws over expensive government promotions

 

cook.JPG


"[Randall's] aesthetic poll was more accurate than his political acumen"

-Tom Hawthorne, Toronto Globe and Mail


#472 aastra

aastra
  • Member
  • 16,953 posts

Posted 17 September 2020 - 07:59 AM

Endless loop:

 

Victoria News

September 14, 2020

 

Saanich Housing Strategy task force to start tackling the issue this month

 

--

 

Daily Colonist
January 7, 1969

- Saanich sets up council committee to tackle housing crisis;


  • Nparker and todd like this

#473 Rob Randall

Rob Randall

    C'mon man, cut out the malarkey

  • Member
  • 14,628 posts

Posted 17 September 2020 - 10:02 AM

"Gentlemen, our evolution from committee to task force is complete. Our work here is done".


  • Barrrister likes this

"[Randall's] aesthetic poll was more accurate than his political acumen"

-Tom Hawthorne, Toronto Globe and Mail


#474 Mike K.

Mike K.
  • Administrator
  • 60,493 posts

Posted 17 September 2020 - 03:00 PM

Lol!
  • todd likes this

Know it all.
Citified.ca is Victoria's most comprehensive research resource for new-build homes and commercial spaces.


#475 aastra

aastra
  • Member
  • 16,953 posts

Posted 18 September 2020 - 11:56 AM

I have many memories of the McDonald's restaurant in this building, but I can't find any pictures of it.
 

Anyway, once again I have to ask why Burger King's efforts in Victoria were so controversial whereas McDonald's, Dairy Queen, Kentucky Fried chicken, A&W, Burger Chef and others had already been in business for years. McDonald's in particular would continue to expand. Was Burger King the villain simply because it was late to the party? Or were there other machinations behind the scenes?

 

 

Daily Colonist
July 18, 1979

Two-decker coming up

The golden arches of McDonald's may yet grace downtown Victoria. (aastra says: the Pandora location was already celebrating its 10th birthday by this point)

The hamburger firm announced Tuesday it would open an outlet at 1130 Douglas, between Fort and View.

A company spokesman said plans called for a two-storey restaurant.

He said architects were already working on a design that would enhance the brick building's architectural features.

The firm hopes to have the restaurant in operation by Christmas.

In 1977, McDonald's tried to establish an outlet at Douglas and Broughton, next to the Strathcona Hotel, but had to drop plans because fire regulations made construction of a restaurant at the site unfeasible.

--

 

 

Daily Colonist
September 15, 1979

City toughens fast-food war

 

(aastra says: What war? Didn't you just tell me McDonald's was opening in the heart of downtown on Douglas between Fort and View?)

The city's resolve to keep a free-standing fast-food restaurant from being built in the 800-block Yates was strengthened Thursday.

City council decided to appeal a ruling Wednesday by the B.C. Supreme Court which ordered the city to issue a building permit to a developer who wants to build a Burger King restaurant on the former Empress Motors site.

Council also approved a bylaw declaring all land bounded by Blanshard and Quadra, Johnson and View a development permit area.

The prospective Burger King site is within the boundaries of the development permit area.

The case, being fought in two courts and the council chamber, began when the developer applied for a building permit. The city refused the application.

But Mr. Justice Thomas Berger (!) ruled that the city didn't have the power under the B.C. Municipal Act to withhold the building permit and ordered that the permit be issued.


Edited by aastra, 18 September 2020 - 11:57 AM.


#476 todd

todd
  • Member
  • 8,580 posts

Posted 18 September 2020 - 08:29 PM

1963
B93327EF-F988-4D6A-AF25-833B2B8C1657.jpeg
https://archive.org/...olonist19630421

Edited by todd, 18 September 2020 - 08:30 PM.


#477 aastra

aastra
  • Member
  • 16,953 posts

Posted 05 November 2020 - 05:44 PM

Oak Bay traffic woes are over:

 

 

Daily Colonist
April 14, 1964

All Lights Are Green Under Oak Bay Scheme

Oak Bay works committee has recommended installing traffic-control signs which will permit motorists on Foul Bay Road to travel the route from Oak Bay Avenue to Cedar Hill Cross Road without missing a green light.

Four sets of traffic signals on the road have been timed to permit:

- 24 miles-an-hour no-stop travel from Oak Bay Avenue to Cadboro Bay Road;

- 28 miles-an-hour from Cadboro Bay Road to Lansdowne and;

- 25 miles-an-hour from Lansdowne to Cedar Hill Cross Road.

...this would allow the rare but desirable situation of motorists being able to pass through all green lights going either way.

...many drivers who do maintain the proper speeds will find themselves waiting for people who sped on ahead when they reach a controlled intersection.


  • todd likes this

#478 aastra

aastra
  • Member
  • 16,953 posts

Posted 05 November 2020 - 07:44 PM

In the news item about the break-ins at the little row of stores on Foul Bay Road, the question was posed re: whether those stores had ever been robbed before:

 

 

Daily Colonist
December 1, 1964

Couple Wanted For Questioning

A middle-aged man and a woman companion are being sought for questioning by Oak Bay Police in connection with the Sunday disappearance of $1,500 in cash and cheques from a grocery store strongbox.

Edwin G. Lewis, proprietor of Lewis' Low Cost Food Market, 2897 Foul Bay Road, told police he found a bundle of cash and cheques was missing and the inner door of the office safe jimmied about 11pm.

Clumsy Job

In another weekend theft, clumsy safecrackers stole $754 from a safe at Bapco Paint Supply, 719 Yates. They forced a mezzanine floor window to gain entry and peeled the door off the five-foot by three-foot safe with tools found at the scene.

Thieves used the same method to break a safe in the office of the S.S. Kresge Ltd. Douglas Street store less than a month ago.

 

--

 

This led me to discover the answer to my own question from a while ago re: safecrackings back in the day. Why were there so many safecrackings? Here's the answer: a) because the police department was overburdened, not enough beat cops, and b) because Vancouver was a place. In other words, the same lame explanations that Victorians still fall back upon today whenever it's convenient to do so.

 

 

Daily Colonist
January 4, 1963

Too Many Thefts
Too Few Constables


"Can the Police Stop This?"

A mounting wave of burglaries and safecrackings has district merchants asking: "Can the police stop this?"

Recent victims and police alike blame lack of manpower for the problem.

W.J. Clark, insurance manager of Hagar and Swayne, said burglary claims against insurance had increased over the past few years.

More Than Ever

 

"Before 1958 or 1957 we didn't have a burglary claim of any kind for 10 years. (aastra says: give me a break) I think there were 18 last weekend. There were a great many more claims in the past 12 months than there had ever been before in Victoria."

There have been more than a dozen major safecrackings in the area since early last year with a total haul of almost $70,000, together with dozens of minor burglaries and many unsuccessful safecracking attempts.

Most recent safe job happened yesterday morning when more than $2,000 in cash and cheques was taken from a city store.

Most of the victims said police were doing the best they could, but almost all felt police forces are understaffed.

"In business circles it has been questioned, 'How come there have been mighty few arrests.'"

"We are satisfied the police give us the attention we require but we are disappointed that nobody is caught."

Mr. Davies is manager of the city store hit by safecrackers yesterday.

Mr. Davies' store has lost $7,000 in three robberies in the past three years. None was recovered, he said.

Biggest Haul

Major safecracking in the past 12 months was $21,000 stolen from Don Mee Company, a scant 100 yards away from the city police station...

Others were the theft of $12,500 from the Humboldt Street liquor store...; theft of $15,000 in cash and cheques from the Hi-Way Foodliner at Colwood Corners...

Three Times

Colwood Pharmacy at Colwood Corners has been robbed three times, losing several thousands of dollars and drugs; ...owner of the Guest House Hotel in Oak Bay, lost $1,300 in cash, cameras, a pistol and typewriter over the July 1 weekened; the Atlas Theatre in Victoria was robbed of $600 the same weekend.

City Police Chief John Blackstock said flatly that his force is understaffed.

"There is no question the force is short of men. Victoria now has 98 men and we need more. The business area is stretching out, there is more work to be done, the population is bigger."

"We have good ferries now and they can take the 7 a.m. ferry and be pretty well across the water before we know about a job."

Leave Lights On

"Have the safe where it can be seen from the street. Have windows on back alleys barred. Leave lights burning inside and in the alley."

"Leave a number of marked bills in the safe at all times. Make sure premises are securely fastened. We get an average of about 90 insecure premises a month."

"Trying, But--"

"They don't seem to be able to catch anybody. Nobody gets caught. We could have more police in Oak Bay. They are all in cars. They would catch you if you went through a stop sign. There should be some beat constables walking around."

Need More

 

"The police are doing the best they can with a huge territory (Saanich)... We do need more police in Saanich but I don't think Saanich can afford it. The whole thing would be more efficiently run if there was amalgamation."

"After a while you wonder what is going to stop it. I would like to see beat policemen increased. The government ferries have made it very easy for safecrackers."

--

$2,000 Loot Lost To Safecrackers

Safecrackers netted over $2,000 in cash and cheques early yesterday morning when they broke into and robbed Spencer's Stores Ltd., 1420 Douglas.

It was the third time in three years the store had been burglarized.

The loot was taken from a 500-pound steel plate safe which had been hacked open when the thieves found they could not remove it from the building.

Too Big

They had apparently tried to get the safe into an elevator, but it was too big. It was found stuck in the elevator door.

Stairs Damaged

The safe had been removed from a small office on a landing. Its weight damaged the stairs and woodwork as it was lugged to the ground floor.

Police later found two blasting caps...


Edited by aastra, 05 November 2020 - 07:48 PM.


#479 aastra

aastra
  • Member
  • 16,953 posts

Posted 05 November 2020 - 07:55 PM

And again I'm inclined to observe the contradiction contained in just this one page of old news items:

 

- The police are overburdened, thus they aren't able to deal with serial pedophiles in city parks

 

- The police are overburdened, thus they aren't able to deal with safecrackers and burglars

 

- The police are overburdened, thus they're enforcing parking restrictions at softball games



#480 aastra

aastra
  • Member
  • 16,953 posts

Posted 05 November 2020 - 08:06 PM

"Before 1958 or 1957 we didn't have a burglary claim of any kind for 10 years..."

 

Meanwhile, up in Campbell River in 1956:

 

 

Daily Colonist
December 19, 1956

Safe Found Safe, Shoppers Return

Campbell River -- Christmas shoppers were crowding back into Laver's store here late yesterday after being barred earlier in the day by police who were fearful that a safe might blow up in the building.

Safecrackers had knocked the dial from the safe in a weekend attempt to open it.

Until explosives experts determined otherwise, RCMP feared the strongbox might have been loaded with an explosive charge that wasn't touched off.

Police are still looking for the safecrackers.

 

--

 

Meanwhile, down in Oak Bay in 1950:

 

 

Daily Colonist
October 31, 1950

Police Hunt For Thieves Who Blasted Club Safe

Oak Bay Police today are continuing the search for yeggs who early yesterday morning blew open a safe at the Victoria Golf Club and escaped with $200.

The safecrackers, who appeared to be experienced, knocked the dial off the safe and then used nitroglycerine to finish the job.

They gained entrance to the premises by forcing a back door and then jimmying the door to the office containing the safe. An iron bar was used to knock off the dial. The telephone wires were cut.

The caretaker told police he heard a noise about 4 a.m. but didn't investigate. (aastra says: now that's a heavy sleeper! Check the pic of the blown safe.)

A safe at the club was blown about 1947, police recalled.

 

--

 

Meanwhile, back in Victoria in 1947:

 

 

Daily Colonist
May 20, 1947

Yeggs Get $4,000 from City Safes

Shown above are the smashed safes in two city premises which yielded approximately $4,000 to expert safecrackers over the weekend. In the top photo, Miss D. Mitchell, of the staff of B. W. Brown & Sons, Ltd. wholesale fish dealers, 640 Montreal Street, looks over the safe from which thieves took between $300 and $400. Although a charge of nitro-glycerine was used to break open the heavy safe, the strong box itself was little damaged...

George Goodenough, secretary of the Eagles' Club, is shown below with the safe from which yeggs stole approximately $3,600...

Yeggs also knocked the dial off a safe in the office of the Boilermakers' Hall, 902 Government Street, but efforts to open the heavy door were unsuccessful.

--

Daily Colonist

May 20, 1947

Safecrackers, Thieves Stage Busy Week-End

Safecrackers who smashed open the safes in the offices of the Eagles' Home, 751 View Street, and Brown's Fish Wharf, Inner Harbor, over the week-end, escaped with approximately $4,000 in cash, city police reported yesterday morning. A third attempt, at the Boilermakers' Hall, 902 Government Street, was unsuccessful when the thieves failed to open the safe after knocking off the dial.

Investigating the robbery at the Eagles' Home early yesterday, police pursued a man through the rear of the premises fronting on Fort Street, but in the darkness the man escaped.

Later, the watchman at Balmoral House, Douglas Street, reported to police a man had broken into a room from a fire escape, ran through the corridors and out the main entrance. Police searched the district without results.


Edited by aastra, 05 November 2020 - 08:34 PM.


You're not quite at the end of this discussion topic!

Use the page links at the lower-left to go to the next page to read additional posts.
 



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users