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University of Victoria (UVic) construction


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#381 rjag

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Posted 15 November 2018 - 08:19 PM

Highly educated foreigners who want to become permanent residents are precisely the type of immigrants we should be striving to attract.

 

I like what was proposed in the US, every PhD should come with a Green Card. The same should apply in Canada



#382 AllseeingEye

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Posted 15 November 2018 - 09:38 PM

Don't think the trend of wealthy foreign students is particularly new. In my experience there was always a high proportion of monied foreign students at UVic; in our time it was the Iranians, usually the upper middle class (and higher) crust, who'd fled from Khomeini's Revolution in 1979. Several of them hung out in our group - great people - but they never ever pretended to be your typical, "perpetually broke and working two job" students like the rest of us.

 

Most of that crew came from displaced, uber-wealthy Tehran families who had fled with their cheque books and were on parental "allowances" of as much as $3k/month ('clear' - it was spending cash for social and other activities only, their education and living costs naturally all paid for separately by the parents) - and this was back in 1981. These 19-20 year old students were driving high end Porsche's, Beemers and Mercedes Benz' years before those cars became commonplace around town.



#383 spanky123

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Posted 16 November 2018 - 07:20 AM

Right, so while we blame a handful of rich foreigners buying condos for our housing situation, we have literally thousands of units rented to international students (who are highly profitable to the Universities). So why aren't we pushing more at that pressure point if we want to address housing affordability. *Those* are the units that might actually provide affordable housing, while the high-end condo units are aimed at another market entirely.

 

Don't forget that it is the CoV taxpayer who paid for, and the Mayor of Victoria who organized two trips to China to recruit even more students and foreign buyers. Look at who accompanied her on the trip.

 

We want foreign money but we don't want the obligations that come with it.



#384 spanky123

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Posted 16 November 2018 - 07:21 AM

Don't think the trend of wealthy foreign students is particularly new. In my experience there was always a high proportion of monied foreign students at UVic; in our time it was the Iranians, usually the upper middle class (and higher) crust, who'd fled from Khomeini's Revolution in 1979. Several of them hung out in our group - great people - but they never ever pretended to be your typical, "perpetually broke and working two job" students like the rest of us.

 

Most of that crew came from displaced, uber-wealthy Tehran families who had fled with their cheque books and were on parental "allowances" of as much as $3k/month ('clear' - it was spending cash for social and other activities only, their education and living costs naturally all paid for separately by the parents) - and this was back in 1981. These 19-20 year old students were driving high end Porsche's, Beemers and Mercedes Benz' years before those cars became commonplace around town.

 

75% of UVIC students are from outside of Victoria. I have been told that in some courses over 50% of the students are international. We have always had foreign students but I don't think that the percentages have been that high.



#385 AllseeingEye

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Posted 16 November 2018 - 09:49 AM

75% of UVIC students are from outside of Victoria. I have been told that in some courses over 50% of the students are international. We have always had foreign students but I don't think that the percentages have been that high.

Uvic at least back to the late 70's and 80's always had high percentage of non-Victoria students, likely not 75% in 1982 but certainly higher than 50%; aside from Iranians there were lots of Taiwanese and as mainland China was starting to open up post-Mao, we saw the first mainland-born Chinese students as well as a significant proportion of Americans. In fact a surprisingly high percent of the staff and specifically the professors were US born and trained. At least two of mine - highly respected on campus and in their respective fields (History and Political Science) - were Vietnam-era draft dodgers.



#386 Jackerbie

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Posted 16 November 2018 - 11:32 AM

75% of UVIC students are from outside of Victoria. I have been told that in some courses over 50% of the students are international. We have always had foreign students but I don't think that the percentages have been that high.

 

Highly dependant on the program. International students account for 18% of UVic enrollment, i.e. just under 4,000 students.



#387 Casual Kev

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Posted 16 November 2018 - 01:25 PM

I like what was proposed in the US, every PhD should come with a Green Card. The same should apply in Canada

 

The problem with formalizing this approach is that doctorates become a literal path to citizenship, so you'd most likely have a vast array of institutions coming up with softball programs whose primary purpose would be to serve as a PR assembly line - which kind of happens already at the undergraduate level through lesser known colleges. PhDs already score highly in the points system and often come with other attributes to help them get over the threshold, but it could be a problem if we were to lay the carpet for those who may have the certification but not really check any other box.



#388 amor de cosmos

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 08:05 AM

Internationally known Ocean Networks Canada, based at the University of Victoria, has settled into a refurbished building at the six-hectare Queenswood property on Arbutus Road.

ONC operates two underwater cable systems off Vancouver Island and others in the Arctic and Atlantic that collect an array of long-term continuous data, including information on seismic activity.

At the building’s official opening Thursday, federal Fisheries Minister Jonathan Wilkinson committed $12.6 million over the next four years to allow ONC to pursue projects such as monitoring factors that affect endangered southern resident killer whales. Researchers put their population at 74.

Wilkinson said that gaining a better sense of how noise is affecting the whales is a priority.

“An effective strategy to save the whales is urgent. There aren’t that many of the whales left, and as we know from reports just a couple of weeks ago there are some that are not in great health, largely because they’re not feeding enough.”

The newly revamped site, known as the Ocean-Climate Building, is a former residential-care facility operated by the Sisters of St. Ann before they sold the Queenswood land to UVic in 2010.

The building’s conversion to a research and technology centre cost $9.5 million.

Funding for the project included $5.15 million from UVic, $3.5 million from the federal government and $850,000 from the province.

“It’s going to be a world-leading centre for research that’s going to help us to better manage human activity going forward, related to both climate change and also to marine issues,” Wilkinson said.

More than 200 people work in the 30,000-square-foot building, which is within two kilometres from UVic’s main campus.

https://www.timescol...uvic-1.23591667

#389 Bob Fugger

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 10:04 AM

Fun Fact: when the Sisters of St. Ann sold this building to UVic, it was with the understanding that all or part of it would be used as daycare facilities.  I don't know if this was a handshake deal, in the contract or even a covenant.  That never happened, of course, leading to the closure of their after-school care program.



#390 jasmineshinga

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Posted 11 January 2019 - 11:43 AM

The building required extensive renovations to make it healthy and workable, a daycare lacks the revenue necessary to make such a renovation fiscally sound, hence the change of use.

 

No idea what sort of arrangement may have been made during the purchase stage... before my time.


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#391 Bob Fugger

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Posted 14 January 2019 - 03:30 PM

The building required extensive renovations to make it healthy and workable, a daycare lacks the revenue necessary to make such a renovation fiscally sound, hence the change of use.

 

No idea what sort of arrangement may have been made during the purchase stage... before my time.

 

Like a lot of what a university provides, daycare is not provided on a for-profit basis.  Once the ONC came knocking, the administration didn't even look at it.  Nor did it consider refurbishing the perfectly useful Velox building, which has a large playing field and parking.  It is currently being used as storage.  Very, very expensive storage.  Instead, they straight up cancelled the after-school care program.



 



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