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CRD Recycling/garbage


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#41 Mike K.

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Posted 27 November 2015 - 11:13 AM

Start?

But I thought...
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#42 Nparker

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Posted 27 November 2015 - 11:20 AM

The obvious solution is for us to start peeing in our recycled bottles for a win win.

You mean you don't do that already?  ;)



#43 Greg

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Posted 27 November 2015 - 11:22 AM

The obvious solution is for us to start peeing in our recycled bottles for a win win.

 

Good environmental stewardship. Saves all the greenhouse gas emissions associated with the bottles making the round trip to the Anheuser-Busch bottling plant.



#44 insanelydeadlydisease

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Posted 27 November 2015 - 02:17 PM

That's the problem - local brewers who rely heavily on returns of bottles for re-use don't want them recycled.  People are simply tossing their re-usable beer bottles into the blue box for recycling which keeps them from being re-used.

At the bottle depot they just literally throw the bottles in a big bin smashing them half the time. 



#45 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 08:50 AM

If the curbside collection of glass is discontinued, citizens would be expected to return bottles to depots and other businesses providing refunds. Non-refundable glass containers, such as jars, would also be the responsibility of residents.

 

Windsor, a member of the CRD’s environment committee, said he supports the move to halt curbside glass collection, in part because a reduced service would save taxpayers money.

 

Discontinuing curbside collection of glass containers would result in a net savings to the CRD of about $100,000 annually, CRD staff say in a report to the environment committee. The CRD pays Emterra Environmental about $5 million a year for collection service.

 

But CRD director Geoff Young said it is unreasonable to expect people to return non-refundable glass to recycling depots.

 

“I don’t think people should be required to worry about trips to the depot when they buy a jar of pickles,” the Victoria councillor said.

 

Curbside collection across much of the province changed in May 2014, when industry group Multi-Material B.C. took over responsibility for managing residential recycling.

 

MMBC has sought to discontinue curbside glass collection in favour of having residents take containers to recycling depots, the staff report says. However, it has accepted curbside glass collection provided the glass is separated.

 

Prior to MMBC, the report says, the CRD took any refundable containers collected through the curbside program to local bottle depots to obtain the refund, with the revenues helping to support the collection program.

 

- See more at: http://www.timescolo...h.KWKmr9aQ.dpuf

 

Honestly.  The GHG emissions damage of everyone going to the three or four bottle depots far outweigh the $100,000 savings.

 

And Young is right, the little lady in James Bay that walks to get her groceries can return her refund bottles where she buys them, but now she has to find a way to get other glass away from her home?


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#46 Mike K.

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 08:53 AM

What an incredible savings of $0.003 for every resident of the CRD. Good work, Capital Regional District, on helping keep taxes at-bay.

 

Something's fishy here. We're creating a stink over $100,000 of a $5 million contract to Emterra? That $100,000 represents 2% of Emterra's annual budget.


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#47 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 08:59 AM

Some of the pressure is coming from the bottle depot operators and the local bottlers.  I think that's their issue to solve, not the government's.

 

Do any of the local brewers even accept empties returned directly to them?  That might be a start.

 

I've stated before, this whole deposit system is wonky.


<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#48 Dr.Doinglittle

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 09:28 AM

What an idiotic idea. I've lived in places with no curbside glass removal and instead have depots you drive to. Guess what people did? Threw the glass in the garbage.

#49 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 09:30 AM

What an idiotic idea. I've lived in places with no curbside glass removal and instead have depots you drive to. Guess what people did? Threw the glass in the garbage.

 

Which I don't think is the end of the world.  Glass in a landfill is probably a pretty inert material.


<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#50 sebberry

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 09:36 AM

I don't have the space in my place to further separate and store my recyclables.  If you think I'm carting (reusable) bags full of empty jam jars back to the grocery store you're fooling yourself. 

 

We used to have a pretty top-notch recycling program here and it's sad to see that it could fall apart like this.  Next thing we'll be doing with the new sewage plant is separating the yellow from the brown before flushing it down.


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#51 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 09:50 AM

We used to have a pretty top-notch recycling program here and it's sad to see that it could fall apart like this.  

 

Yup, if anything we should be finding ways to expand the materials accepted in blue boxes, not limiting them.


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<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#52 Mike K.

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 11:10 AM

People living in small condos and apartments are having a difficult time as it is separating recyclables, garbage, empties, food waste, etc. Now that glass will require a separate bin lots of people will say...

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#53 Bingo

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 12:38 PM

Glass%20Recycling%20Infographic.png

Glass Facts
  • Glass is 100% recyclable and can be recycled endlessly without loss in quality or purity.
  • Glass is made from readily-available domestic materials, such as sand, soda ash, limestone and “cullet,” the industry term for furnace-ready recycled glass.
  • The only material used in greater volumes than cullet is sand. These materials are mixed, or “batched,” heated to a temperature of 2600 to 2800 degrees Fahrenheit and molded into the desired shape.
  • Recycled glass can be substituted for up to 95% of raw materials.
  • Manufacturers benefit from recycling in several ways: Recycled glass reduces emissions and consumption of raw materials, extends the life of plant equipment, such as furnaces, and saves energy.
  • Recycled glass containers are always needed because glass manufacturers require high-quality recycled container glass to meet market demands for new glass containers.
  • Recycled glass is always part of the recipe for glass, and the more that is used, the greater the decrease in energy used in the furnace. This makes using recycled glass profitable in the long run, lowering costs for glass container manufacturers—and benefiting the environment.
  • Glass containers for food and beverages are 100% recyclable, but not with other types of glass. Other kinds of glass, like windows, ovenware, Pyrex, crystal, etc. are manufactured through a different process. If these materials are introduced into the glass container manufacturing process, they can cause production problems and defective containers.
  • Furnace-ready cullet must also be free of contaminants such as metals, ceramics, gravel, stones, etc.
  • Color sorting makes a difference, too. Glass manufacturers are limited in the amount of mixed color-cullet (called "3 mix") they can use to manufacture new containers. Separating recycled container glass by color allows the industry to ensure that new bottles match the color standards required by glass container customers.
  • Some recycled glass containers are not able to be used in the manufacture of new glass bottles and jars or to make fiberglass. This may be because there is too much contamination or the recycled glass pieces are too small to meet manufacturing specifications. Or, it may be that there is not a nearby market for bottle-to-bottle recycling. This recovered glass is then used for non-container glass products. These "secondary" uses for recycled container glass can include tile, filtration, sand blasting, concrete pavements and parking lots. 
  • The recycling approach that the industry favors is any recycling program that results in contaminant-free recycled glass. This helps ensure that these materials are recycled into new glass containers. While curbside collection of glass recyclables can generate high participation and large amounts of recyclables, drop-off and commercial collection programs tend to yield higher quality recovered container glass.
Glass Recycling Statistics
  • Glass bottles and jars are 100% recyclable and can be recycled endlessly without any loss in purity or quality.
  • The container and fiberglass industries collectively purchase 3 million tons of recycled glass annually, which is remelted and repurposed for use in the production of new containers and fiberglass products.
  • Over a ton of natural resources are saved for every ton of glass recycled.
  • Energy costs drop about 2-3% for every 10% cullet used in the manufacturing process.
  • One ton of carbon dioxide is reduced for every six tons of recycled container glass used in the manufacturing process.
  • There are 46 glass manufacturing plants operating in 22 states.  16 companies operate 51 glass beneficiating facilties (aka "glass processing" plants) in 27 states.  At the glass processing plants, recycled glass is further cleaned and sorted to spec, then resold to the glass container manfuacturing companies for remelting into new food and beverage containers.
  • In 2013, 41.3% of beer and soft drink bottles were recovered for recycling, according to the U.S. EPA. Another 34.5% of wine and liquor bottles and 15% of food and other glass jars were recycled. In total, 34% of all glass containers were recycled, equivalent to taking 210,000 cars off the road each year.
  • States with container deposit legislation have an average glass container recycling rate of just over 63%, while non-deposit states only reach about 24%, according to the Container Recycling Institute.
  • Beverage container deposit systems provide 11 to 38 times more direct jobs than curbside recycling systems for beverage containers. (Source: The Container Recycling Institute, "Returning to Work: Understanding the Jobs Impacts from Different Methods of Recycling Beveage Containers").
  • About 18% of beverages are consumed on premise, like a bar, restaurant, or hotel. And glass makes up to about 80% of that container mix.
  • In 2008, NC passed a law requiring all Alcohol Beverage Permit holders to recycle their beverage containers. Since then, they have boosted the amount of glass bottles recovered for recycling from about 45,000 tons/year before the ABC law to more than 86,000 tons in 2011.
  • Glass bottles have been reduced in weight approximately 40% over the past 30 years.
  • Recycled glass is substituted for up to 95% of raw materials.
  • Manufacturers benefit from recycling in several ways—it reduces emissions and consumption of raw materials, extends the life of plant equipment, such as furnaces, and saves energy.
  • An estimated 80% of all glass containers recovered for recycling are remelted in furnaces, and used in the manufacture of new glass containers.  Source, Strategic Materials, Inc.
  • Recycling 1,000 tons of glass creates slightly over 8 jobs. (Source: 2011 Container Recycling Institute).

 

Carbon Calculator »

http://www.gpi.org/r...recycling-facts


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#54 Bingo

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 09:09 PM

Used glass will become the new chesterfield...but it in a bag and leave it out on the boulevard just down the street.



#55 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 28 November 2015 - 09:13 PM

    • Glass is 100% recyclable and can be recycled endlessly without loss in quality or purity.
    • Glass is made from readily-available domestic materials, such as sand, soda ash, limestone and “cullet,” the industry term for furnace-ready recycled glass.

     

    In other words, it's made from stuff that costs next to noting.  So it's not economical for them to collect used glass from us to make new glass, when they can just scoop some more sand.


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#56 mbjj

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Posted 08 March 2016 - 08:02 PM

Used glass will become the new chesterfield...but it in a bag and leave it out on the boulevard just down the street.

I have a friend who lives in Gloucester, Ontario. She says that every two weeks they can put out basically whatever they want...couches, mattresses, old appliances...and everything is taken away. I would be in garbage heaven if we had that here. Our garage is looking like something from Hoarders right now, no way to get rid of stuff.


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#57 Mike K.

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 09:30 AM

Take it to the private dump off Keating X in Central Saanich. I can't remember what it's called but you can dump just about anything and it's by weight.

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#58 jonny

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 09:35 AM

Just put it all on Craigslist as free and it'll all be gone in a day.



#59 Bingo

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 12:17 PM

Just put it all on Craigslist as free and it'll all be gone in a day.

 

Or take it down to Dallas Road and add it to the stuff on the barge.



#60 nagel

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Posted 09 March 2016 - 12:18 PM

Hartland is pretty reasonable as long as you fill up a truck.  If you're taking 3 bags up there you will pay an unreasonable rate due to the base site price.



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