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South Island Aboriginal and First Nations issues and discussion


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#41 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 10 February 2016 - 08:14 AM

Probably a good pre-emptive move.


<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#42 Sparky

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 01:47 PM

Perhaps we should continue our discussion about First Nations here. 


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#43 Nparker

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 02:50 PM

Perhaps we should continue our discussion about First Nations here. 

And have the applicable posts moved over from the Lisa Helps thread.



#44 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 03:08 PM

Poplar River First Nation is 3,800 acres (1,500 ha). As of 2013, the total population of registered Indians was 1,543 with 1245 on reserve, and 298 off reserve. The primary language spoken is Ojibwe, with some blending of the Cree dialect also known as Ojicree. The majority of surnames are BruceFranklin, and Berens.

 

 

Children attend Poplar River Elementary School from grade 1 to 9. This school features a modern gymnasium, library and standard education programs. Members who pursue education beyond grade 9 must attend high schools, universities or colleges off reserve.

 

 

https://en.wikipedia...er_First_Nation

 

Sigh, what a life to bring kids up in.


<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#45 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 03:15 PM

Songhees:

 

 
Governance

Chief and Council share their responsibility to govern the Nation equally. Any Council decision requires the approval of a quorum of four (4) Council Members. Elections are held every two years. As evidenced by election results since 1957, Songhees has exceptionally stable leadership.

Now, what do you figure that means?

http://www.songheesnation.ca/about-us/


<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#46 spanky123

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 07:49 AM

^ Looks like the band hasn't updated their website.

 

The Songhees recently agreed to abide by the new "First Nations Elections Act" and held their first election in June of this year. The terms are now 4 years not 2. Under the old "Native Election Act" rules there were no penalties for any violations of election law (ie vote buying, bribery, intimidation, etc) with an appeal to the Minister being the only recourse (and we all know how willing the Government is to involve itself in FN affairs). 

 

The FN bands are hoping that the new election regime will provide credibility and help assist them in funding various projects that they wish to undertake.

 

http://www.aadnc-aan...6/1323194764725



#47 jonny

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 08:19 AM

Cassidy said:

 

The massive elephant in the room is that First Nations reservations DON'T WORK, and as politically incorrect as it is to say that out loud, it's painfully obvious to all who bother to take note.

Throwing taxpayers guilty money at First Nations in an effort to assuage "settlers guilt" accomplishes NOTHING OF VALUE - something that's been proven time and time again.

 

 

They certainly don't work in the model we currently use, where the federal government funds many of the bands on an ongoing basis.

 

Reservations seem to work OK when there are jobs or when they are near economic centers. Many natives have no jobs and no money so they rely on handouts. They become dependent on the band, who gets money from Ottawa.

 

Many aboriginals have gone from living off the land to living off of social welfare as the ability to survive from harvesting fur and fish has disappeared. In many cases, these are uneducated people with little to no marketable skills.

 

The biggest problem is that many aboriginals do not participate in the modern, global economy. To quote Clarence Louie, Chief of the Osoyoos Indian Band, “If you want to kill a man, take away his job. If you want to kill a community, you take away its economy.”

 

Other issues are:

Massive public health issues (unhealthy water, lack of sanitation, sedentary lifestyle, obesity, heart disease, diabetes, alcoholism, fetal alcohol syndrome, etc.)

Corruption

Zero land ownership

Soviet style public housing

Remoteness

Crowding

Unsafe/unhealthy homes not built to "code" (mold issues, water infiltration, etc.)


Edited by jonny, 06 September 2017 - 08:21 AM.


#48 spanky123

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 08:33 AM

I think it is more basic than that. Reservations seem to work ok when they have honest, ethical, hard working leadership - like non-FN businesses and organizations. Many bands have extensive land leases and commercial business operations. Good or bad, those revenue streams are hidden from public view and may or may not be used for the good of the many as opposed to the good of the few. 

 

I don't buy the marketable skills argument. We have loads of Syrian refugees who have few marketable skills and no understanding of basic English yet they seem to be having no difficultly getting jobs. 



#49 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 08:38 AM

I submit that location is the first problem. But others factors are certainly at play too. Look at our local reservations.
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#50 North Shore

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 11:52 AM

I submit that location is the first problem. But others factors are certainly at play too. Look at our local reservations.

Well f-ing MOVE then!

Canada, indeed North America, is full of people who upped and moved from their home areas for reasons of economy, persecution, religion, and so on - and then faced further denigration when they got here for the same reasons.  Yet, they persevered...


Say, what's that mountain goat doing up here in the mist?

#51 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 12:04 PM

You lose most all your entitlements if you leave the reservation.
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#52 jonny

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Posted 06 September 2017 - 12:21 PM

You lose most all your entitlements if you leave the reservation.

 

The Indian Act strikes again. Which is why we need to get on with the treaty process. Get more of these people off Indian Affairs life support 



#53 amor de cosmos

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Posted 09 September 2017 - 07:59 AM

Are/were there first-nations holidays? I couldn't find anything right away. I wonder because the Day of the Dead has sort of gone mainstream in Mexico, and it's an old pre-Colombian holiday that goes way back.

Also, has anyone applied to get all manner of first nations artwork, singing, dancing, etc & especially west-coast carving, added to UNESCO's intangible cultural heritage list? If you look at the list of other things that have been named to the list our first-nations stuff fits right in there. I tend to think if the mediterranean diet makes the cut, why not west-coast first nations artwork? Canada could have a dozen things on that list. There are actually three lists but the one that seems to be most appropriate is
 

The Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity (see criteria) is made up of those intangible heritage elements that help demonstrate the diversity of this heritage and raise awareness about its importance.


Inscription on the Representative List

Criteria

In nomination files, the submitting State(s) Party(ies) is (are) requested to demonstrate that an element proposed for inscription on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity satisfies all of the following criteria:

  • R.1 The element constitutes intangible cultural heritage as defined in Article 2 of the Convention.
  • R.2 Inscription of the element will contribute to ensuring visibility and awareness of the significance of the intangible cultural heritage and to encouraging dialogue, thus reflecting cultural diversity worldwide and testifying to human creativity.
  • R.3 Safeguarding measures are elaborated that may protect and promote the element.
  • R.4 The element has been nominated following the widest possible participation of the community, group or, if applicable, individuals concerned and with their free, prior and informed consent.
  • R.5 The element is included in an inventory of the intangible cultural heritage present in the territory(ies) of the submitting State(s) Party(ies), as defined in Article 11 and Article 12 of the Convention.
https://ich.unesco.o...scription-00809
 


Article 2 – Definitions

For the purposes of this Convention,
1. The “intangible cultural heritage” means the practices, representations, expressions, knowledge, skills – as well as the instruments, objects, artefacts and cultural spaces associated therewith – that communities, groups and, in some cases, individuals recognize as part of their cultural heritage. This intangible cultural heritage, transmitted from generation to generation, is constantly recreated by communities and groups in response to their environment, their interaction with nature and their history, and provides them with a sense of identity and continuity, thus promoting respect for cultural diversity and human creativity. For the purposes of this Convention, consideration will be given solely to such intangible cultural heritage as is compatible with existing international human rights instruments, as well as with the requirements of mutual respect among communities, groups and individuals, and of sustainable development.
2. The “intangible cultural heritage”, as defined in paragraph 1 above, is manifested inter alia in the following domains:
(a) oral traditions and expressions, including language as a vehicle of the intangible cultural heritage;
(b) performing arts;
© social practices, rituals and festive events;
(d) knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe;
(e) traditional craftsmanship.

3. “Safeguarding” means measures aimed at ensuring the viability of the intangible cultural heritage, including the identification, documentation, research, preservation, protection, promotion, enhancement, transmission, particularly through formal and non-formal education, as well as the revitalization of the various aspects of such heritage.
4. “States Parties” means States which are bound by this Convention and among which this Convention is in force.
5. This Convention applies mutatis mutandis to the territories referred to in Article 33 which become Parties to this Convention in accordance with the conditions set out in that Article. To that extent the expression “States Parties” also refers to such territories.

https://ich.unesco.o...convention#art2

Edited by amor de cosmos, 09 September 2017 - 11:20 AM.


#54 Wayne

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 07:07 PM

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...doubt-1.4289265

"None of us are leaving, so let's stop the guilt and blame and find a way to live together and share," she wrote. "All Canadians are then free to preserve their cultures in their own communities, on their own time, with their own dime."


Sen. Lynn Beyak's comments; Racism, Colonial thinking or forward thinking?

#55 LJ

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 07:11 PM

Well the mainstream media couches it as racism, I think more pragmatism without the PC shell.


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Life's a journey......so roll down the window and enjoy the breeze.

#56 Benezet

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Posted 14 September 2017 - 09:00 PM

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...doubt-1.4289265
...
Sen. Lynn Beyak's comments; Racism, Colonial thinking or forward thinking?

You'd think a Senator would know that First Nations people have by law been Canadian citizens since the mid-20th century (and arguably for some ten or fifteen millennia prior to that).

Edited by Benezet, 14 September 2017 - 09:06 PM.


#57 spanky123

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 07:01 AM

^ I think her choice of words is poor but her message resonates with many non-aboriginal Canadians. 



#58 jonny

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 07:13 AM

Canada didn't exist ten or fifteen millennia prior to the mid 20th century.
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#59 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 07:29 AM

 
'Enough is enough': Katzie First Nation members feel safer after gate installation
Community patrols weren't enough, so members install gates at all reserve entrances

http://www.cbc.ca/ne...4290888?cmp=rss

 
<p><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><span style="color:rgb(40,40,40);font-family:helvetica, arial, sans-serif;">"I don’t need a middle person in my pizza slice transaction" <strong>- zoomer, April 17, 2018</strong></span></em></span>

#60 spanky123

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 07:59 AM

^ Sounds to me like gates aren't the solution.

 

Even though band members have been documenting suspicious activity and passing it along to RCMP, police officers don't have the authority to remove people who've been invited onto the premises.



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