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South Island Aboriginal and First Nations issues and discussion


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#781 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 21 February 2023 - 05:59 PM

How come almost no FN families can even reminder who might have died, to submit a list?

 

So much historical revision happening here, but political correctness can't let it be called out.

 

A lot of people being taken for the fool.


Edited by Victoria Watcher, 21 February 2023 - 06:02 PM.


#782 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 22 February 2023 - 02:50 AM

Ground-analyzing technologies have identified 17 potential unmarked graves on lands that were once part of the Alberni Indian Residential School, the Tseshaht First Nation announced Tuesday.

The results do not show human remains and do not confirm a site is a grave, said Brian Whiting of GeoScan, a company using ground-scanning radar equipment at Alberni and other former residential schools.

The only way to be 100 per cent certain is by testing and excavation, he said.

https://www.timescol...-school-6590215

Edited by Victoria Watcher, 22 February 2023 - 02:51 AM.


#783 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 02 March 2023 - 04:49 AM

Land back is complicated. Here's what we can learn from a B.C. island returned to the Saanich people

 

https://www.cbc.ca/r...ief_8500_917824



#784 amor de cosmos

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Posted 07 March 2023 - 08:07 AM

On Monday, Nathan Cullen, B.C.'s minister of water, land and resource stewardship, said $100 million is being invested in a watershed security fund co-managed by the B.C.-First Nations Water Table (BCFNWT), which includes members from the government and B.C. First Nations. 
 
The money will be used to maintain and restore watersheds and wetlands.
 
Cullen said watersheds are facing not only the threat of climate change but competing interests from industries such as farming and fishing and long-term, sustainable planning is critical.

"The actions we take will build safer communities," said Cullen at a news conference.
 
A discussion paper released by the Environment Ministry in January 2022 said areas of focus for the watershed security strategy could include the availability of safe drinking water, healthy ecosystems, ensuring a sufficient supply of water to support food security, as well as reducing risks from hazards like flooding and drought.

https://www.cbc.ca/n...tions-1.6769457

Unvaccinated athletes getting notice they can’t compete at Indigenous games
NAIG says Mi’kmaw elders aren’t comfortable with having unvaccinated visitors.
https://www.aptnnews...digenous-games/

Edited by amor de cosmos, 07 March 2023 - 08:11 AM.


#785 dasmo

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Posted 07 March 2023 - 09:20 AM

https://www.cbc.ca/n...tions-1.6769457

Unvaccinated athletes getting notice they can’t compete at Indigenous games
NAIG says Mi’kmaw elders aren’t comfortable with having unvaccinated visitors.
https://www.aptnnews...digenous-games/

Ironic... I guess since they have suffered so much at the hand of government mandates already. Perhaps it's just one more thing..... 

 

In Canada, Indigenous women were forcibly sterilized under various historic government policies including Alberta’s Sexual Sterilization Act, which was in force from 1928, when the eugenics movement was gaining momentum, until 1972. At that time Indigenous people represented about 2.5 per cent of the population but made up 25 per cent of those who were sterilized, according to Auger.

A large number of sterilizations happened in Indian hospitals, where many women were forced to sign while in labour or otherwise medically vulnerable.

https://www.ualberta...tum, until 1972.

 

the Sexual Sterilization Act of Alberta was substantial and long lasting. Over 4800 people were authorized for sterilization under the Act, with more than 2,800 persons sterilized under its mandate and its two amendments (1937 and 1942). The Act was repealed in 1972 by the newly-elected provincial government of Peter Lougheed.

 

https://eugenicsarch... Peter Lougheed.

http://eugenicsarchi...c2ec50000000091



#786 amor de cosmos

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Posted 07 March 2023 - 10:04 AM

i thought it's the mi'kmaw competition organisers who are requiring vaccination :confused:


Edited by amor de cosmos, 07 March 2023 - 10:38 AM.


#787 dasmo

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Posted 07 March 2023 - 11:29 AM

i thought it's the mi'kmaw competition organisers who are requiring vaccination :confused:

Yes, they are mandating them. Thus the irony.... You would think they would reject this nonsense instigated by the same corporation that nearly genocided them not too long ago. CANADA INC. Perhaps this is not as it was written by the CBC. That should strongly be considered here. I'm going to ask my buddy in a local band council and see if I can get the inside scoop. 



#788 amor de cosmos

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Posted 10 March 2023 - 07:51 AM

A Federal Court judge has approved a $2.8-billion settlement agreement between the Canadian government and plaintiffs representing 325 First Nations whose members went to residential day schools.

Justice Ann Marie McDonald said in her ruling issued Thursday that the settlement is intended to help take steps to reverse the losses of language, culture and heritage through an Indigenous-led not-for-profit body.

https://www.cbc.ca/n...roved-1.6774186



#789 LJ

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Posted 10 March 2023 - 07:56 PM

:whyme:


Life's a journey......so roll down the window and enjoy the breeze.

#790 amor de cosmos

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Posted 30 March 2023 - 07:22 AM

The Vatican on Thursday formally repudiated the Doctrine of Discovery, the theories backed by 15th-century papal bulls that legitimized the colonial-era seizure of Indigenous lands and form the basis of some property law today.
 
A Vatican statement said the 15th-century papal bulls, or decrees, "did not adequately reflect the equal dignity and rights of Indigenous peoples" and have never been considered expressions of the Catholic faith.
 
It said the documents had been "manipulated" for political purposes by colonial powers "to justify immoral acts against Indigenous peoples that were carried out, at times, without opposition from ecclesial authorities."
 
The statement, from the Vatican's development and education offices, said it was right to "recognize these errors," acknowledge the terrible effects of colonial-era assimilation policies on Indigenous peoples and ask for their forgiveness.
 
The statement was a response to decades of demands from Indigenous people for the Vatican to formally rescind the papal bulls that provided the Portuguese and Spanish kingdoms the religious backing to expand their territories in Africa and the Americas for the sake of spreading Christianity.
 
*snip*
 
The Vatican offered no evidence that the three 15th-century papal bulls (Dum Diversas in 1452, Romanus Pontifex in 1455 and Inter Caetera in 1493) had themselves been formally abrogated, rescinded or rejected, as Vatican officials have often said. But it cited a subsequent bull, Sublimis Deus in 1537, that reaffirmed that Indigenous peoples shouldn't be deprived of their liberty or the possession of their property, and were not to be enslaved.
 
It was significant that the repudiation of the Doctrine of Discovery came during the pontificate of history's first Latin American pope. The Argentine Francis before the Canadian trip had apologized to Indigenous peoples in Bolivia in 2015 for the crimes of the colonial-era conquest of the Americas.

https://www.cbc.ca/n...mands-1.6795728

Edited by amor de cosmos, 30 March 2023 - 07:24 AM.


#791 amor de cosmos

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Posted 02 April 2023 - 07:09 AM

A global movement to grant rivers legal personhood recently reached Canada, and a local Indigenous leader is asking whether the Gatineau River could be next.
 
Former Kitigan Zibi Chief Gilbert Whiteduck said such legal designation would provide the Gatineau River better environmental protection, and he's "pushing" to make it a reality.
 
The movement, which is largely led by Indigenous communities, environmental groups and scientists, is designed to afford rivers and other ecological features stronger legal protections by granting them rights normally reserved for people.
 
"I believe that, as an Algonquin Anishinaabe, we need to work together to protect the land," Whiteduck told CBC's All In A Day.
 
"A lot of people that I've met — older people, family members — say yes, this is something we can do together."
 
Whiteduck said the Gatineau River is a culturally and historically significant waterway for the Algonquin Anishinaabe people, and local groups may soon attempt to follow Indigenous bands from around the world by expanding the river's protections through the emerging tool of environmental rights.

https://www.cbc.ca/n...erson-1.6794975

#792 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 02 April 2023 - 11:51 AM

072627BD-5D97-490D-90CB-4FC1862AF9E8.jpeg

https://www.canadian...annabis-summit/

#793 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 22 April 2023 - 11:24 PM

On signs and markers throughout Greater Victoria, Indigenous place names are starting to become more common.

The shift has seen Greater Victoria enter something of a “toponymic revolution,” according to University of Victoria historian John Lutz.

“By and large, we like to kind of take advantage of place naming to kind of make it a link to a story. There are some Indigenous places, things like Esquimalt, Saanich, Camosun that still are part of our culture, but most of those stories have been overwritten by settler stories.


https://www.vicnews....eater-victoria/

Edited by Victoria Watcher, 22 April 2023 - 11:25 PM.


#794 Nparker

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Posted 23 April 2023 - 04:23 AM

Settler is a racist term.
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#795 amor de cosmos

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Posted 23 April 2023 - 05:51 AM

this bit stood out for me

“There are lots of Indigenous place names that you name places that Europeans don’t have any names for. Indigenous people have names for even very specific rocks where they catch their fish from that Europeans would never name and likewise, Europeans have named places where they would anchor their ships like Royal Roads, for example. Here the road is a reference to where you anchor ships, not a driving road but a road for ships. First Nations would never think about a place where you would anchor ships, that wasn’t one of the things that they had to deal with, so each culture has different reasons for naming different kinds of places.”

 
i thought of all the marine terms SENĆOŦEN has & that english doesn't; they may not have had to anchor ships but they've got a bunch of words for things that english doesn't have because they spend so much time on the water

http://saanich.montl...arineterms.html



#796 Mike K.

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Posted 23 April 2023 - 06:02 AM

We all have localized identifiers to locally important things, that are not officially named, because there’s no need to name everything officially, but socially groups of people identify precise places and precise things important to them.

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#797 amor de cosmos

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Posted 28 April 2023 - 07:02 AM

The provincial government is putting $200 million toward the implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.
 
Minister of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation Murray Rankin announced the money Thursday (April 27) at the provincial legislature following a virtual townhall with First Nations leader. Rankin said the Declaration Act Engagement Fund will give First Nations the necessary resources to participate in the UNDRIP implementation.
 
Adopted by the United Nations in 2007 after decades of negotiations, UNDRIP codifies various political, social and economic rights for Indigenous peoples around the world.

https://www.nanaimob...tion-of-undrip/
 

Ten nations in Treaty 9 have released a draft copy of a lawsuit against Canada and Ontario they say will be filed over a faulty treaty process and lack of consultation over what happens on their territory.
 
The draft, which was released Wednesday, is asking the courts for $95 billion in compensation plus control over what happens on their lands including resource extraction.
 
The treaty was signed with the ten nations between Canada, Ontario over years starting in 1905.
 
Attawapiskat First Nation, Apitipi Anicinapek Nation, Aroland First Nation, Constance Lake First Nation, Eabametoong First Nation, Fort Albany First Nation, Ginoogaming First Nation, Kashechewan First Nation, Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug First Nation and Neskantaga First Nation are involved in the legal action.
 
According to the document, “The written text of the Treaty was prepared “at headquarters” (Ottawa and Toronto) as between Canada and Ontario without any Indigenous Signatories’ input. The Treaty Commissioners representing Canada and Ontario took the prepared written text and met with the Treaty 9 Nations in their territories.
 
“The Treaty Commissioners did not speak to the Treaty 9 Nations about the language, concepts or implications of the written text, including the cede, release and surrender or taking up clauses.”
 
Lawyers for the action say the statement of claim will be filed within 60 days.

https://www.aptnnews...canada-ontario/


Edited by amor de cosmos, 28 April 2023 - 07:09 AM.


#798 spanky123

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Posted 28 April 2023 - 08:04 AM

^ Hey why not. Now we are suing over treaties that were negotiated and signed and previous not under dispute. If the Feds keep giving then why not keep asking.



#799 Daveyboy

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Posted 28 April 2023 - 08:56 AM

Let's just counter-offer the Treaty 9 claim down to $75 billion compensation and be done with that one at least.  PSAC workers, sorry folks.....



#800 amor de cosmos

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Posted 09 May 2023 - 06:28 AM

A Saskatchewan First Nations woman's story about her father's residential school experience has won the world's top journalism award.

Stolen: Surviving St. Michael's, a podcast by journalist Connie Walker and the team at Spotify's Gimlet Media, won the 2023 Pulitzer Prize for best audio journalism.

"I feel like I'm still in shock. It's disbelief. It means so much. It's an incredible honour," Walker said Monday.

"I think of all of the people bravely shared these stories with us. People should know these stories. More people will hear them now."
 
Walker is a former CBC journalist now working for New York-based Gimlet Media. She's a member of the Okanese First Nation in southern Saskatchewan.
 
The team working with Walker included former Saskatoon StarPhoenix reporter Betty Ann Adam, a member of the Fond du Lac Denesuline Nation in northern Saskatchewan.

https://www.cbc.ca/n...dcast-1.6836625



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