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The More Victoria Changes, the More It Stays the Same...


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#521 aastra

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Posted 20 December 2020 - 12:49 PM

It wouldn't be the first time someone on this board has gone off half-cocked.

 

For sure it would be the second time at least, if not the third time.



#522 aastra

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Posted 25 December 2020 - 05:27 PM

Yet more apartments that seemed very luxurious when new but that don't seem nearly so luxurious today as they approach 50 years old.

 

 

Daily Colonist
January 6, 1972

Tallest Tower Approved

Standard Life Assurance Co. has been given a permit for construction of Victoria's tallest highrise apartment building.

...the building will have 21 storeys and 198 luxury suites and will cost an estimated $3.6 million. It will be situated at the corner of Toronto and Young Streets in James Bay, immediately south of Orchard Houses.

The apartment tower will be built on an elevated rock formation, making it a few feet higher than the 22-storey Orchard House...

Standard will own and operate the building... thus "greatly enhancing the long-term investment."

 

Daily_Colonist-January_6_1972.jpg


Edited by aastra, 25 December 2020 - 05:37 PM.

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#523 aastra

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Posted 25 December 2020 - 05:53 PM

It was a decisive make-or-break moment for Victoria in 1971. New highrise buildings were threatening to sap the city's uniqueness and ruin it forever. And new highrise buildings continue to threaten to sap the city's uniqueness and ruin it forever even a full 50 years later. It's a decisive make-or-break moment that never seems to end.
 

 

Daily Colonist
September 1, 1971

It's Our City!

Victoria stands at the crossroads. Greatness, in terms of a pleasing, different place to live, or sad stereotype that will make Victoria simply that city over on the island.

 


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#524 Nparker

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Posted 25 December 2020 - 07:58 PM

50 years on the precipice...you know the end has to be nigh.



#525 aastra

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Posted 28 December 2020 - 10:51 AM

Check it out:

 

A rare and extremely valuable violin has been lost/stolen from a parked car in Los Angeles.

 

Hopefully that news story will come to a heartwarming conclusion when the violin is recovered. Maybe the grateful owner will thank all involved by treating them with a special performance.

 

It reminded me of this heartwarming news story from last week in Toronto about a rare and extremely valuable violin that was lost/stolen on a train but then later recovered.

 

Which reminded me of this heartwarming news story from August in Texas about a rare and extremely valuable violin that was lost/stolen but then later recovered.

 

Which reminded me of this heartwarming news story from last year in London about a rare and extremely valuable violin that was lost/stolen on a train but then later recovered.

 

Which reminded me of this heartwarming news story from last year in Connecticut about a rare and extremely valuable violin that was lost/stolen from a home but then later recovered.

 

Which reminded me of this heartwarming news story from 2016 in Germany about a rare and extremely valuable violin that was lost/stolen on a train but then later recovered.

 

Which reminded me of this heartwarming news story from 2016 in London about a rare and extremely valuable violin that was lost/stolen on a train but then later recovered.

 

Which reminded me of this heartwarming news story from 2014 in Wisconsin about a rare and extremely valuable violin that was stolen but then later recovered.

 

Which reminded me of this heartwarming news story from 2012 in Switzerland about a rare and extremely valuable violin that was lost/stolen on a train but then later recovered.

 

Which reminded me of this heartwarming news story from 2010 in London about a rare and extremely valuable violin that was lost/stolen in a train station but then later recovered.

 

Which reminded me of this heartwarming news story from 2008 in New York about a rare and extremely valuable violin that was lost in a taxi but then later recovered.

 

 

Violins made by Italian Antonio Stradivari (1644-1737), considered by many the world's most important luthier or crafter of stringed instruments, are extremely rare and valuable. There are probably no more than 600 still in existence.

The instruments have a habit of making the news.

 

Indeed, almost as if it's just a template news story.


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#526 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 28 December 2020 - 11:00 AM

i lost my first 5 violins.  

 

now i play the double bass.



#527 Rob Randall

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Posted 28 December 2020 - 11:03 AM

Story from 1960 about a teenage Winnipeg girl who managed to track her stolen $600 violin to a Harlem pawn shop. She said she bought the violin by working as a car hop and by stuffing weiners in a packing plant which made me wonder how many wieners do you actually have to stuff to earn such a valuable instrument.

 

Clearly the violin is the most elusive and slipperiest of instruments. If you have one, handcuff it to your wrist in a briefcase like the Blues Brothers.


"[Randall's] aesthetic poll was more accurate than his political acumen"

-Tom Hawthorne, Toronto Globe and Mail


#528 aastra

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Posted 28 December 2020 - 11:06 AM

It reminds me of this heartwarming news story from 1975 in Atlanta about a rare and extremely valuable violin that was lost/stolen from a parked car but then later recovered.

 

 

Daily Colonist
November 27, 1975

ATLANTA - Atlanta Symphony violinist Benjamin Picone got his stolen $60,000 violin back Tuesday for $200. "I've never, even been happier," said Picone. "I've really got it back. It feels so wonderful, so blessed wonderful." The violin, made by famed Italian violin-maker Guadagnini in 1781, was stolen from Picone's car Oct. 3. Picone had offered a $5,000 reward but heard nothing until he was contacted by telephone Tuesday by a couple who bought the violin from a youth.


Edited by aastra, 28 December 2020 - 11:22 AM.


#529 aastra

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Posted 28 December 2020 - 11:09 AM

 

now i play the double bass.

 

You don't remember the time Yo-Yo Ma left his rare and extremely valuable cello in a taxi? No worries, that story had a heartwarming ending.


Edited by aastra, 28 December 2020 - 11:32 AM.

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#530 Rob Randall

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Posted 28 December 2020 - 11:11 AM

Clearly, getting a violin back brings people more joy than having to listen to the damn things.


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"[Randall's] aesthetic poll was more accurate than his political acumen"

-Tom Hawthorne, Toronto Globe and Mail


#531 Mike K.

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Posted 28 December 2020 - 11:18 AM

Sounds like the greatest marketing scheme of all time. Millions in free media coverage, time and time again, in the world’s largest cities.

Know it all.
Citified.ca is Victoria's most comprehensive research resource for new-build homes and commercial spaces.


#532 aastra

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Posted 28 December 2020 - 11:27 AM

We should scrutinize all news stories in the same manner. If you really want to step into 2021 on the right foot, search for stolen ashes returned. That might be the mother of all template stories.


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#533 Nparker

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Posted 28 December 2020 - 11:36 AM

All you ever see in the news anymore are stories of sex and violins.


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#534 Rob Randall

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Posted 28 December 2020 - 11:56 AM

We should scrutinize all news stories in the same manner. If you really want to step into 2021 on the right foot, search for stolen ashes returned. That might be the mother of all template stories.

 

It's second only to the famed "Bus Plunge" story.


"[Randall's] aesthetic poll was more accurate than his political acumen"

-Tom Hawthorne, Toronto Globe and Mail


#535 todd

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Posted 28 December 2020 - 01:21 PM

Once left an ounce on a bench when we came back the jar was empty.
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#536 Matt R.

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Posted 29 December 2020 - 11:55 PM

Once left an ounce on a bench when we came back the jar was empty.


Only users lose drugs.

Matt.

#537 todd

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Posted 30 December 2020 - 10:59 AM

OBPD: “On December 26th, the Oak Bay Police received a theft from auto report in the 1400 block of St. Patrick St. The theft occurred overnight, and the vehicle was believed to be unlocked. Suspect rummaged through the vehicle and stole a package of cigarettes. (OB File 20-4096)“ http://oakbaypolice....21-27-2020/amp/

#538 todd

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Posted 30 December 2020 - 11:04 AM

Only users lose drugs.

Matt.

Matt it was cookies only users make assumptions.
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#539 aastra

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Posted 10 January 2021 - 09:46 AM

Template stories, everywhere. Police resources are stretched to the limit; business owners should be more careful; private security is being hired but the need for private security will soon be over; crimes are brazen; convictions are few:

 

--

 

CHEK News
January 2021

 

The Victoria Police Department says this is the latest in a sophisticated stealing spree happening across the region.

"They’re actually removing glass from doors and windows. That requires specialized tools and knowledge to do," said Bowen Osoko, spokesperson for Victoria Police.

Police say there have been almost two dozen robberies like this in the past month.

Police are suggesting all shops in Victoria remove their goods from sightlines at night, take all cash off the premises, and to make sure they have working alarms and surveillance video.

But the downtown business association doesn't believe the burden, should be on the shop owners.

"9-5 is very safe downtown. But these businesses are currently hiring their own security to protect their businesses at night when they already pay 3.5 times the residential tax rate," said Jeff Bray of the Downtown Business Association.

"It is time for the city to recognize they need to properly fund police resources in order to provide for public safety."

 

--

 

Times-Colonist
January 16, 2020

Business owners in Victoria’s trendy LoJo district are considering hiring their own security firm due to a rise in shoplifting and the inability of police to respond in a timely way, the Downtown Victoria Business Association says.

“We’ve heard from lots of our members about a significant increase in theft and shoplifting that’s occurring and the brazen nature of it — the sense that there’s no police, there’s no enforcement, they’re just walking in and taking stuff and walking out and not too concerned,” he said.

"So we thought by us all contributing to a private security firm, it would bring a sense of safety back to the street."
 

Bray said his association has a good relationship with the police department, “but the reality is they don’t have the resources to deal with this.

We’ve identified this now for two years that we need increased police presence and resources downtown. We need the crime-prevention unit re-established. Those are the groups that helped to prevent these crimes in the first place.”

 

--

 

CBC News

March 2017

Manak said 
extra challenges of policing in Victoria include a high concentration of liquor seats in clubs and bars, as well as three halfway houses for released prisoners.
 

"The challenge that we see in Victoria many times is … the number of high-risk offenders that are in our communities that have to be managed and that we have to oversee," he said.
 

He said the halfway houses aren't to blame for the high crime rate but do require significant police resources for curfew checks and making sure that people are following their conditions of release.
 

Targeting chronic offenders, 'hot spots'

Manak said the force is making the most of existing resources by targeting high crime hot spots and chronic offenders.

 

--

 

Police chief: Tide turning' on core woes
Times-Colonist
28 Apr 1994

Victoria police are well on their way to removing the need for private muscle to keep downtown shoppers and storekeepers safe, Police Chief Doug Richardson said Wednesday.

Richardson said enforcement on Yates Street, where merchants have hired private security guards, has been stepped up and police will soon be using a mobile police headquarters to improve response time of officers downtown. "I believe we are turning the tide on this," said Richardson.

He was responding to a Times-Colonist story that private security is being hired even though Victoria has more police per capita than any city in the province and spends almost the most per capita on police.

The story prompted more calls for "value-for-cash" in Victoria police operations from Coun. Bob Friedland.

"Somebody has got to take an independent, cold, hard, cynical look at how they are spending their money," said Friedland...

But Richardson said the police department is already regularly audited by the B.C. Police Commission.

And Richardson said the department must go before the police board and council to justify its budget. "It's a very arduous and comprehensive process,"

 

--

 

Victoria eyes early closing for bars
Times-Colonist
23 Feb 1994

Closing cabarets earlier and at staggered times might help police cope with the flood of people who pour on to city streets in the early hours, says Victoria's mayor. "Instead of worrying about increased costs of dealing with the problem, let's go to the source of the problem and let's see if we can do anything about that," Mayor Bob Cross said...

The city has long been concerned about problems created when bars close and people pour on to downtown streets. Police say their resources are stretched to the limit. "This has been discussed before and we have never been able to reach a good consensus on it."
 

Cross will ask the city's liquor licensing committee and staff to look into the matter and make recommendations prior to contacting nightclub operators. The number of licensed seats should likely be examined as well...

Victoria Police Chief Doug Richardson hammered home his point at the budget meeting with council, after working downtown at night recently. "It was almost fire-hose policing from one call to another." He witnessed "violence and destruction. It was just amazing."

 

--

 

Times-Colonist
November 28, 1991

Beggars, teens scare shoppers from core

Profane street kids and persistent panhandlers are driving Victoria shoppers away from the downtown area and into suburban malls.

That's the finding of a recent survey... commissioned by the Victoria Business Improvement Association...

...the survey showed only a third of respondents regularly shop downtown.

Respondents criticized downtown Victoria for lacking the cleanliness, convenience and free parking of the malls. They also expressed concern for their personal safety in the city core.

Eighty-eight per cent of respondents said increased police presence should be part of any downtown revitalization efforts.

Despite consumer fears... Victoria police Insp. Brian Hayes said few crimes are actually committed against shoppers walking on streets.

But knots of lippy teenagers, rambunctious skateboarders, tenacious beggars and occasional day-shift prostitutes create an unsettling image - especially for seniors...

"Some groups of young people pose a perceived threat to older shoppers. They often block sidewalks and shout obscenities."

Occasionally pedestrians are knocked down by "unapologetic" skateboarders, Hayes said. At times youths also obstruct passersby.

The police department had two constables begin daytime bicycle patrols last year to assist four colleagues on foot, and another two uniformed cyclists will soon be deployed, Hayes said.

Victoria city councillor Alan Lowe predicted future redevelopments of Bastion Square and of vacant landmarks such as the Sussex Hotel and Marks & Spencer will help rid the area of "undesirables."

Council also wants to revitalize several blocks of Broad Street between city hall and Victoria Eaton's Centre, Lowe said.

The Victoria Eaton's Centre... has helped stop the flow of customers leaving downtown since it opened...

The mall hires private security and centre merchants participate in a neighborhood watch-type program.

 

--

 


Daily Colonist
January 4, 1963

Too Many Thefts
Too Few Constables


"Can the Police Stop This?"

A mounting wave of burglaries and safecrackings has district merchants asking: "Can the police stop this?"

Recent victims and police alike blame lack of manpower for the problem.

W.J. Clark, insurance manager of Hagar and Swayne, said burglary claims against insurance had increased over the past few years.

More Than Ever

 

"Before 1958 or 1957 we didn't have a burglary claim of any kind for 10 years. (aastra says: give me a break) I think there were 18 last weekend. There were a great many more claims in the past 12 months than there had ever been before in Victoria."

There have been more than a dozen major safecrackings in the area since early last year with a total haul of almost $70,000, together with dozens of minor burglaries and many unsuccessful safecracking attempts.

Most recent safe job happened yesterday morning when more than $2,000 in cash and cheques was taken from a city store.

Most of the victims said police were doing the best they could, but almost all felt police forces are understaffed.

"In business circles it has been questioned, 'How come there have been mighty few arrests.'"

"We are satisfied the police give us the attention we require but we are disappointed that nobody is caught."

Mr. Davies is manager of the city store hit by safecrackers yesterday.

Mr. Davies' store has lost $7,000 in three robberies in the past three years. None was recovered, he said.

City Police Chief John Blackstock said flatly that his force is understaffed.

"There is no question the force is short of men. Victoria now has 98 men and we need more. The business area is stretching out, there is more work to be done, the population is bigger."

"We have good ferries now and they can take the 7 a.m. ferry and be pretty well across the water before we know about a job."

Leave Lights On

"Have the safe where it can be seen from the street. Have windows on back alleys barred. Leave lights burning inside and in the alley."

"Leave a number of marked bills in the safe at all times. Make sure premises are securely fastened. We get an average of about 90 insecure premises a month."

"Trying, But--"

"They don't seem to be able to catch anybody. Nobody gets caught. We could have more police in Oak Bay. They are all in cars. They would catch you if you went through a stop sign. There should be some beat constables walking around."

Need More

 

"The police are doing the best they can with a huge territory (Saanich)... We do need more police in Saanich but I don't think Saanich can afford it. The whole thing would be more efficiently run if there was amalgamation."

"After a while you wonder what is going to stop it. I would like to see beat policemen increased.

 

--

 

 

Daily Colonist
March 30, 1960

 

City Crime "Normal"

Chief Tells Mayor

 

Under Control Once More

Crime situation in Victoria is back to normal, Police Chief John Blackstock yesterday assured Mayor Percy Scurrah.

 

"Do you think you've got it under control?" the mayor asked at a police commmission meeting. Chief Blackstock nodded and informed him that all but one of recent break-ins have been solved.

 

But the police commission didn't think much of storekeepers' part in discouraging burglary.

 

Storekeepers Criticized

The police chief's report showed 113 premises found insecure in February, and Mayor Scurrah noted, "In spite of the number of break-ins, the number of insecure premises is increasing. How do you impress upon people the need..."

"It's got me beat," said the chief.

"We'll have to have a bylaw with a penalty for leaving premises unlocked," suggested Commissioner Chester Dowman. Commissioner William Hamilton opposed adding to the number of city bylaws, but thought owners should be assessed the cost "of the policement tied up" by insecure premises.


Edited by aastra, 10 January 2021 - 10:08 AM.

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#540 aastra

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Posted 18 January 2021 - 09:35 AM

...

 

 

CHEK News
January 18, 2021

We need more police presence, we need police patrols. That’s the municipal responsibility, public safety.”

 

...

 

 

Daily Colonist
January 4, 1963

"After a while you wonder what is going to stop it. I would like to see beat policemen increased.



 



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