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COVID ECONOMICS


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#561 sukika

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Posted 10 July 2020 - 01:31 PM

https://www.irishtim...amage-1.4300102

 

"Per million people, Sweden has suffered 40 per cent more deaths than the United States, 12 times more than Norway, seven times more than Finland and six times more than Denmark."

 

"Sweden’s central bank expects its economy to contract by 4.5 per cent this year, a revision from a previously expected gain of 1.3 per cent. The unemployment rate jumped to 9 per cent in May from 7.1 per cent in March. “The overall damage to the economy means the recovery will be protracted, with unemployment remaining elevated,” Oxford Economics concluded in a recent research note.

 

This is more or less how damage caused by the pandemic has played out in Denmark, where the central bank expects that the economy will shrink 4.1 per cent this year and where joblessness has edged up to 5.6 per cent in May from 4.1 per cent in March. In short, Sweden suffered a vastly higher death rate while failing to collect on the expected economic gains."


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#562 GetLisaSomeHelps

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Posted 10 July 2020 - 01:33 PM

Achieving herd immunity globally would require approximately 250 million people to die from COVID (557k have so far).



#563 spanky123

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Posted 10 July 2020 - 02:54 PM

https://www.irishtim...amage-1.4300102

 

"Per million people, Sweden has suffered 40 per cent more deaths than the United States, 12 times more than Norway, seven times more than Finland and six times more than Denmark."

 

"Sweden’s central bank expects its economy to contract by 4.5 per cent this year, a revision from a previously expected gain of 1.3 per cent. The unemployment rate jumped to 9 per cent in May from 7.1 per cent in March. “The overall damage to the economy means the recovery will be protracted, with unemployment remaining elevated,” Oxford Economics concluded in a recent research note.

 

This is more or less how damage caused by the pandemic has played out in Denmark, where the central bank expects that the economy will shrink 4.1 per cent this year and where joblessness has edged up to 5.6 per cent in May from 4.1 per cent in March. In short, Sweden suffered a vastly higher death rate while failing to collect on the expected economic gains."

 

Canada has 50x the death rate of Singapore and only 9% unemployed (although 50% of the working population is collecting either the CERB or CEWB)..

 

You can pick whatever stats you want. 


Edited by spanky123, 10 July 2020 - 02:55 PM.

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#564 Greg

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Posted 10 July 2020 - 03:30 PM

Canada has 50x the death rate of Singapore and only 9% unemployed (although 50% of the working population is collecting either the CERB or CEWB)..

 

You can pick whatever stats you want. 

 

Sure but none of them point to herd immunity, and none of them make Sweden a shining example.


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#565 sukika

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Posted 10 July 2020 - 09:16 PM

Sure but none of them point to herd immunity, and none of them make Sweden a shining example.

 

Exactly.  A better example would be Taiwan.  With a population of 23.7 million, the total number of infections so far is 458 with 7 deaths,  schools and businesses were kept open, and the economic growth rate averaged 1.5% for the first 5 months of 2020.  

 

Vietnam has kept their infections very low as well. 


Edited by sukika, 10 July 2020 - 09:18 PM.


#566 Redd42

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Posted 12 July 2020 - 10:20 AM

I wonder how most of the restaurants are doing out there? My guess it is a mixed bag.

 

Went to Smugglers last Friday night. Pretty busy. 

 

But drove by Christie's last night at 6:30 pm and there was one car in the parking lot.

 

At Smugglers I was not asked for any contact info. But some places are saying it is required. This is the statement on Christie's web site:

 

"As required by health regulations, you will be asked to provide a name and phone number or email address every time you enter the pub. This information is only accessed in the case of an infection. It is destroyed after 30 days."



#567 Casual Kev

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Posted 12 July 2020 - 12:18 PM

I wonder how most of the restaurants are doing out there? My guess it is a mixed bag.

 

Went to Smugglers last Friday night. Pretty busy. 

 

But drove by Christie's last night at 6:30 pm and there was one car in the parking lot.

 

At Smugglers I was not asked for any contact info. But some places are saying it is required. This is the statement on Christie's web site:

 

"As required by health regulations, you will be asked to provide a name and phone number or email address every time you enter the pub. This information is only accessed in the case of an infection. It is destroyed after 30 days."

 

i dropped by Hope Key for lunch pickup, they seemed to be very glad to get my business. A few others dropped by while I waited but I'm guessing they're struggling. 



#568 Redd42

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 08:48 AM

Federal wage subsidy to continue to December:

 

https://www.cbc.ca/n...nsion-1.5647520


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#569 spanky123

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Posted 13 July 2020 - 09:37 AM

Federal wage subsidy to continue to December:

 

https://www.cbc.ca/n...nsion-1.5647520

 

$50B here, $50B there and soon you start to add up to real money!


Edited by spanky123, 13 July 2020 - 09:37 AM.

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#570 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 10:46 AM

B.C. expecting $12.5B deficit due to coronavirus

New figures show the province is spending more money on the COVID-19 pandemic with less coming in, potentially pushing the deficit to $12.5 billion. This comes as the province earmarks billions more for COVID-19 relief measures with fewer dollars being spent by British Columbians amid the health crisis.






so the province alone has spent $66 million per death.

Edited by Victoria Watcher, 14 July 2020 - 10:49 AM.


#571 spanky123

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 10:58 AM

B.C. expecting $12.5B deficit due to coronavirus

New figures show the province is spending more money on the COVID-19 pandemic with less coming in, potentially pushing the deficit to $12.5 billion. This comes as the province earmarks billions more for COVID-19 relief measures with fewer dollars being spent by British Columbians amid the health crisis.






so the province alone has spent $66 million per death.

 

 

Don't worry, the politicians will argue that as long as we don't count all of the sources of total debt then our total debt is the lowest in the world!

 

Meanwhile, all levels of Governments are running unparalleled levels of debt but every civil servant will keep their job and the money will keep flowing until we have our snap elections at least.


Edited by spanky123, 14 July 2020 - 10:59 AM.


#572 Casual Kev

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 02:26 PM

B.C. expecting $12.5B deficit due to coronavirus

New figures show the province is spending more money on the COVID-19 pandemic with less coming in, potentially pushing the deficit to $12.5 billion. This comes as the province earmarks billions more for COVID-19 relief measures with fewer dollars being spent by British Columbians amid the health crisis.






so the province alone has spent $66 million per death.

 

We could fly in some Snowbirds and bring that average right down!



#573 RFS

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Posted 14 July 2020 - 03:18 PM

12.5b isn't that bad relatively speaking



#574 spanky123

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 08:02 AM

12.5b isn't that bad relatively speaking

 

On a per capita basis it is about 1/2 of the Federal debt.I feel as though we have got a lot more from the Feds however (ie CERB, CEWB, CEBA, etc).

 

Bottom line is that Canadians love free money and we are handing out more of it on a per capita basis then anywhere else in the world, 4x as much as the US as an example. With elections at the Federal and Provincial level on the horizon we can expect even more. When I suggested a few months ago that the combined debt could hit $1T this year I was scoffed at. Wait for it.

 

We are seeing housing prices and the stock market surge which is exactly where I said the free money would land. Billionaires are going to get even wealthier while the cost of housing and debt servicing will impact the young for a generation if not longer. At least when they complain we can look back at the progressives and respond that this was their own doing.


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#575 Wayne

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 08:11 AM

 Billionaires are going to get even wealthier while the cost of housing and debt servicing will impact the young for a generation if not longer. At least when they complain we can look back at the progressives and respond that this was their own doing.

 

It will never be their fault. They will blame others as it was the cards they were dealt.



#576 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 15 July 2020 - 01:44 PM

Sooke property owners are paying their tax bills on time, say municipal officials.

So far, the district has collected 86 per cent of property taxes for this year, about the same as previous years, said Raechel Gray, director of financial services.


https://www.vicnews....-taxes-on-time/

Edited by Victoria Watcher, 15 July 2020 - 01:44 PM.


#577 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 04:03 PM

A poll by the Canadian Federation of Independent Business suggested tensions are flaring between workers and employers, with around 27 per cent of 3,389 employers polled indicating some of their laid-off staff have refused to return to work.

 

Of the nearly 870 businesses that provided the reasons their employees gave for refusing to return to work, 62 per cent reported workers "prefer the Canada Emergency Response Benefit." Employers could choose more than one explanation for why a worker refused to return, and respondents also selected options such as concern for health (47 per cent), childcare obligations (27 per cent) or lack of hours in return offer (16 per cent).

 

 

https://www.timescol...return to work.


Edited by Victoria Watcher, 16 July 2020 - 04:03 PM.


#578 Casual Kev

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Posted 16 July 2020 - 09:27 PM

Choosing to milk CERB dry before returning to work might backfire in a high-unemployment world, I don't suppose employers will have a short memory for otherwise healthy and available employees.


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#579 Matt R.

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Posted 17 July 2020 - 05:28 PM

CEWS extended to end of December, good news for me for sure, and some improvements!

https://www.canada.c...ote-growth.html

Matt.

#580 Wayne

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Posted 17 July 2020 - 07:17 PM

Many places cannot fully employ staff that I have visited recently due to CERB.

 

Banks, Grocery stores, Restaurants, etc..

 

But I am sure it will buy votes next Federal election



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