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COVID ECONOMICS


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#1921 Barrrister

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 06:49 AM

VicWatcher: Using a curved chisel usually on wood.


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#1922 spanky123

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 08:43 AM

 it's just another way to stick it to the employer...to nickel and dime them away.. just as they did when they transferred the costs of MSP onto the backs of employers to make it look like they are giving it free... another give from one hand while taking with the other

 

That is the part that really irks me, they take credit for it but then toss the costs onto the back of the employers. 


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#1923 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 08:45 AM

is that better than on the backs of taxpayers as a whole? that’s what the $200 would have done. the government has no money.

#1924 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 09:35 AM

In May, the province brought in a temporary program offering up to three days of COVID-related paid sick leave for ­workers who do not already have that benefit. Employers are reimbursed by the province for up to $200 per day per worker. That program ends on Dec. 31.

Asked whether provincial support for employers might continue, Bains said that still has to be determined, based on input from employers and workers.



https://www.timescol...r-10-1.24359780



that article says who pays is yet to be worked out.

Edited by Victoria Watcher, 23 September 2021 - 09:35 AM.


#1925 spanky123

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 09:51 AM

that article says who pays is yet to be worked out.

 

Which means the Government isn't paying. 


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#1926 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 09:55 AM

it’s odd to poll employers on it now without that key detail.

#1927 LJ

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Posted 23 September 2021 - 07:18 PM

When medicare was introduced the province and feds shared the cost at 50/50.

 

Now the feds only put in 22%, the premiers are asking for it to increase to 35%.


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#1928 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 30 September 2021 - 05:26 AM

Daily office occupancy counts remain low, however, at only 20% of pre-pandemic levels, according to card-access data collected by Jawl Properties at 12 core-area buildings.

 

https://www.timescol...port-1.24361201



#1929 spanky123

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Posted 30 September 2021 - 07:12 AM

Interesting that the private sector count (office occupancy) is flat year over year showing no growth since the summer of 2020, but the city's counts (parking, pedestrian, etc) are all showing a huge increase in traffic of 45%.

 

Trying to square that circle.


Edited by spanky123, 30 September 2021 - 07:13 AM.


#1930 lanforod

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Posted 30 September 2021 - 08:08 AM

Uvic is probably back to 75% or higher. I don’t have actual numbers but based on what I’m seeing.

#1931 Mike K.

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Posted 30 September 2021 - 08:39 AM

Do we have a split between private and government offices? The Jawls are a mix of private and public, so it’s difficult to extrapolate a more precise figure form their 20% number.

But 20%, my gosh. Those office costs are still close to 100%, the maintenance contracts are still in place, the furniture leases or financing is still in place, and the office lease cost will rise next year alongside municipal taxes.

Starting in 2022, the third year of the pandemic, around 60% of businesses will have had the chance to close shop within the confines of their lease agreements. Some, as I underwent it, opted for 1-year extensions in 2020 and this year, but what happens in 2022 will largely be a story of what the US does with its cruise ship issue.

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#1932 spanky123

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Posted 30 September 2021 - 08:58 AM

Do we have a split between private and government offices? The Jawls are a mix of private and public, so it’s difficult to extrapolate a more precise figure form their 20% number.

But 20%, my gosh. Those office costs are still close to 100%, the maintenance contracts are still in place, the furniture leases or financing is still in place, and the office lease cost will rise next year alongside municipal taxes.

Starting in 2022, the third year of the pandemic, around 60% of businesses will have had the chance to close shop within the confines of their lease agreements. Some, as I underwent it, opted for 1-year extensions in 2020 and this year, but what happens in 2022 will largely be a story of what the US does with its cruise ship issue.

 

I think that for the most part office space is pretty independent of cruise ships.

 

I think that the Jawl's distribution is pretty representative. 



#1933 Mike K.

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Posted 30 September 2021 - 09:02 AM

Right. I’m referring more-so about street level businesses, not offices. I should have been more clear on that.

The businesses rely on offices for customers, and if they’re at 20%, that means businesses are seeing an 80% reduction in the office customer base. Slash the cruise traffic to 0%, and tourism overall by 25%, and you’ve got one heck of a dismal scenario.

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#1934 spanky123

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Posted 30 September 2021 - 10:23 AM

The boost in downtown traffic these past few months was due to domestic tourism. Walking downtown there was no doubt that there were more people than last year and that many of them were from out of town. That was great for local business but fleeting. That traffic has or will shortly disappear and we will be back to where we were a year ago. The Mayor's report conveniently leaves out that fact and tries to portray her Victoria 3.0 efforts as the catalyst to a sustained recovery.

 

The CRB and CEWS will also be ending in a few weeks. It is not looking like the Liberals will extend them again. That should subdue local spending even further and we will likely see fall 2021 performance behind that of last year.



#1935 Barrrister

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Posted 30 September 2021 - 04:35 PM

Alaska is doing a pretty good job at pitching for its change as part of a Covid recouvery plan. There is a better than even chance of the changes going through. 

 

Less money for Canada and more jobs in Alaska. Everybody wins except us. 



#1936 Mike K.

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Posted 30 September 2021 - 05:29 PM

This is going to be a catastrophic blow to downtown Victoria. I’m shocked by the silence.

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#1937 Barrrister

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Posted 30 September 2021 - 08:18 PM

Mike: The Province will blame the Feds and the Feds will blame the province and both will say how nasty the Americans are being. The city will say that there will be less pollution and perhaps we can build new homeless high rises on the docks so that the underserved can have waterfront homes as well.


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#1938 spanky123

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Posted 01 October 2021 - 08:23 AM

This is going to be a catastrophic blow to downtown Victoria. I’m shocked by the silence.

 

Given that privately nobody in power wants the cruise ships I am not surprised.


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#1939 Ismo07

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Posted 01 October 2021 - 08:25 AM

Interesting that the private sector count (office occupancy) is flat year over year showing no growth since the summer of 2020, but the city's counts (parking, pedestrian, etc) are all showing a huge increase in traffic of 45%.

 

Trying to square that circle.

 

Summer of 2020 wasn't terrible, if we look at July 2020 vs July 2021 we saw about a 20% increase in on-street parking.

 

Edit: July 2021 actually had more on-street transactions than 2018.. Go figure.

 

Edit x2: Actually forget that, we didn't have Sunday paid parking back then, so missing those transactions.  It is close though.


Edited by Ismo07, 01 October 2021 - 08:34 AM.

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#1940 VIResident

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Posted 03 October 2021 - 06:35 PM

The workers who keep global supply chains moving are warning of a 'system collapse'.

 

 

 Guy Platten, secretary general of the ICS, said that worker shortages are likely to worsen towards the end of the year because seafarers may not want to commit to new contracts and risk not making it home for Christmas given port shutdowns and constant change

...."The global supply chain is very fragile and depends as much on a seafarer [from the Philippines] as it does on a truck driver to deliver goods," added Stephen Cotton, ITF secretary general. "The time has come for heads of government to respond to these workers' needs."

 
 

https://www.cnn.com/...JQ1_TIRUi1p9Uuw


Edited by VIResident, 03 October 2021 - 06:36 PM.

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