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[Downtown Victoria] The Juliet condo | 44m | 14-storeys | Built - completed in Oct 2008


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#521 aastra

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 02:46 PM

There's too much concrete on the tower portion, and it needed a shot of colour somewhere, too. It's too monotone.

If the tower were glassier that would probably have done the trick.

#522 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 03:07 PM

What's playing this week at the rooftop theater? Or as I predicted, did it never happen? Nothing on the website about it.

#523 Caramia

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 05:49 PM

I thought that theater was for residents to play their own DVDs for their own guests.
Nowadays most people die of a sort of creeping common sense, and discover when it is too late that the only things one never regrets are one's mistakes.
Oscar Wilde (1854 - 1900), The Picture of Dorian Gray, 1891

#524 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 05:54 PM

It IS/was but that is illegal.

#525 victorian fan

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 05:58 PM

^
Homes movies anyone? ;)

#526 D.L.

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 06:41 PM

I was under the impression the theatre was only for non copyrighted videos

#527 Holden West

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 07:33 PM

http://www.openflix.com/
"Beaver, ahoy!""The bridge is like a magnet, attracting both pedestrians and over 30,000 vehicles daily who enjoy the views of Victoria's harbour. The skyline may change, but "Big Blue" as some call it, will always be there."
-City of Victoria website, 2009

#528 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 03 May 2009 - 09:39 PM

20's, 30's, 40's and 50's films are OK, but not much else.

#529 aastra

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Posted 04 May 2009 - 10:12 AM

Are you saying it's illegal to have it outdoors or illegal period? Many large new condo buildings have a theatre room.

Examples:


http://www.miamicond...0-biscayne-bay/


http://localism.com/...oardwalk-Condos


http://marqueeblog.c...media-room.aspx




http://www.sostours....ondo_152834.htm


http://www.southbeac...m-a-first-look/


http://www.6717000.com/escala/


http://www.lindagpro...iams_island.htm


http://www.panamabea...er_condominium/


http://www.homeaway....-rental/p168042

#530 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 04 May 2009 - 11:34 AM

I don't know the laws outside of Canada, but I DO know the rules in Canada.

It'd be OK to watch a sports game, or TV show, or a documentary (although you'd likely need permission for even the documentary), a movie you taped/PVR'd off of a free television broadcast (but not a Pay-Per-View or Shaw-on-demand type), but it is not legal to go rent or buy a theatrical DVD release from any recent decade, then play it outside of a home, whether you charge admission or not.

#531 aastra

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Posted 04 May 2009 - 02:13 PM

It's definitely not unusual for new condo buildings in Canada to have a media/theatre room. I wonder if anybody has ever tried to sue strata councils because movies were shown in the common areas of condominium buildings?

Do I Need To Obtain Performance Rights?

Yes...

  • if the screening is open to the public, such as showing a foreign-language film to the community for cultural enrichment
  • if the screening is in a public space where access is not restricted, such as an instructor showing a film to a class for curriculum-related purposes in a public or unrestricted-access location
  • if persons attending are outside the normal circle of family and acquaintances, such as showing a film to a club or organization, or showing a film for class but inviting others to attend
No...
  • if privately viewing the film in your room with friends
  • if an instructor is showing the film to officially registered students in a classroom, where content of film directly relates to course


Taverns, restaurants, private clubs, prisons, lodges, factories, summer camps, public libraries, day‐care facilities, parks and recreation departments, churches and non‐classroom use at schools and universities are all examples of situations where a public performance license must be obtained. This legal requirement applies regardless of whether an admission fee is charged, whether the institution or organization is commercial or non‐profit, or whether a federal or state agency is involved.


In other specialized markets, such as hotels and motels, many Hollywood studios may handle licensing arrangements directly.


For example, if you only invite a select group of friends and relatives to agathering, then it is more likely that the viewing of the recorded programme will be considered as private and domestic. On the other hand, if you invite a large group of friends and then permit those friends to invite their own friends, then it is more likely that the viewing of the recorded programme will be considered to be seen in public. In such a situation, there is copyright infringement. It is important to bear in mind that a recording might be seen in public even on private property (e.g. party held in function room of a private condominium).As an alternative, you may instead choose to watch the actual television broadcast or cablecast during the party. This is allowed under our copyright law if the audience is non-paying.


If you want to screen the movie or a substantial part of the movie in a public setting, you will need to obtain a licence from the relevant copyright owner. What is “public” can be relatively wide in scope and depends on factors such as the size and nature of the audience, which the Court will consider and determine. In the present scenario, you are opening the event to ALL residents of the condominium plus a limited number of guests, the identities of whom are unknown to you. In such a situation, you may be considered to be screening the movie in public and will need a licence from the relevant copyright owner. This is unlike a situation where you invite a restricted number of your friends and family to the clubhouse for the event. In this situation, it is more likely that you would be able to establish that you are playing the DVD in a private and domestic setting. If you are uncertain whether a screening is public, it is advisable to check that the copyright owner is agreeable.




#532 aastra

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Posted 04 May 2009 - 02:26 PM

Or maybe condo buildings that contain theatre rooms already have licensing arrangements?

#533 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 04 May 2009 - 02:45 PM

Or maybe condo buildings that contain theatre rooms already have licensing arrangements?


Could be. I forgot what they charged when I was enquiring about the fees once....

This are the big guys in Canada that you can get a license(s) from.

http://www.criterion...vielicence.html

#534 VicHockeyFan

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Posted 04 May 2009 - 07:22 PM

The Superior was running this:

http://www.thesuperior.ca/filmnoir.htm

...and was issued a cease and desist order by some entity this Spring for playing movies without a license.

#535 Caramia

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Posted 04 May 2009 - 07:55 PM

Which totally sucks by the way.
Nowadays most people die of a sort of creeping common sense, and discover when it is too late that the only things one never regrets are one's mistakes.
Oscar Wilde (1854 - 1900), The Picture of Dorian Gray, 1891

#536 Holden West

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Posted 27 July 2009 - 10:27 PM

I pulled this out of Mike's great Coho thread to spotlight how Juliet fits into the skyline. It looks good from near and far.


"Beaver, ahoy!""The bridge is like a magnet, attracting both pedestrians and over 30,000 vehicles daily who enjoy the views of Victoria's harbour. The skyline may change, but "Big Blue" as some call it, will always be there."
-City of Victoria website, 2009

#537 G-Man

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 05:53 AM

It should have been 2 storeys taller.

#538 Caramia

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 09:11 PM

It would work at the size it is if the Sussex building was a little taller.
Nowadays most people die of a sort of creeping common sense, and discover when it is too late that the only things one never regrets are one's mistakes.
Oscar Wilde (1854 - 1900), The Picture of Dorian Gray, 1891

#539 Phil McAvity

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Posted 29 July 2009 - 05:16 PM

^All the buildings should be taller.
In chains by Keynes

#540 aastra

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Posted 29 July 2009 - 05:28 PM

View Towers would look good with another 20 stories on it.

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