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Black and White
Uses: condo, commercial
Address: 1033 Cook Street
Municipality: Victoria
Region: Downtown Victoria
Storeys: 6
Condo units: 75 (1BR, 2BR, penthouse, 1BR + den, 2BR + den, junior 1BR)
Sales status: sold out / resales only
Black and White is a six-storey mixed-used development with five residential levels above a ground floor comme... (view full profile)
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[Fairfield] Black and White | Condos; commercial | 6-storeys | Built - completed in 2019


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#881 Nparker

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 08:18 AM

Growing up, I lived in a subdivision built in the mid-1970s. All services were installed underground during construction. As far as I know they are all still functioning today.



#882 MarkoJ

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 08:19 AM

All brand new subdivisions have all underground services.


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#883 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 08:33 AM

If that were true then no areas would have them underground. But much of even Harris Green doesnt have them. It is just cost.

 

everything is based on cost.  that's how every business and every individual runs their lives.  heck even some governments!  

 

services are put underground when it makes sense.  and at no other time.


Edited by Victoria Watcher, 17 January 2020 - 08:33 AM.


#884 IPH

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 09:15 AM

Nothing to do with BC Hydro or a fragile underground LOL!  BC Hydro has a perfectly serviceable infrastructure in place and does not waste money replacing something that works, simply to benefit a developer rather than the majority of its customers. 

 

The City of Victoria's subdivision and development bylaws require new multi family developments in this zone to have underground service from the pole to the building but doesn't require the developer to put BC Hydro's infrastructure underground along its frontage.  This same developer had the opportunity to put BC Hydro's lines underground along the frontage of its property at the Bowker, but chose not to spend the $400K+ to do so.  I suspect they weighted the cost and benefit here the same way and decided it was not worth the cost as it would not increase the sale price of the units sufficiently to recover that cost. 


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#885 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 09:19 AM

that's correct.  i suspect some people think the developer should be required (by the city) to pay this fee when a new development happens.



#886 Brantastic

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 12:47 PM

everything is based on cost.  that's how every business and every individual runs their lives.  heck even some governments!  
 
services are put underground when it makes sense.  and at no other time.


But at no other time would it be less costly than when the redevelopment of nearly three entire neighborhood occurs, which is currently what’s happening. Wouldn’t it be cheaper to do it while redeveloping all of these properties in Harris Green than to wait 20 years?
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#887 G-Man

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 02:48 PM

I personally think the developer should be required to do it.
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#888 Glen

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 03:48 PM

Underground doesn’t mean an end to outages

While the financial costs to underground infrastructure are significant, they’re not the only reason to keep things overhead.

While buried power lines are protected from the wind and damage from trees that are common causes of outages, buried lines "need to be engineered differently for protection from flooding and earthquakes", which is an important consideration in B.C., where we have significant river systems, heavy precipitation, and a highly active seismic zone.

That additional engineering and specialized construction comes at a higher cost compared to overhead lines. When repairs are required for underground lines (whether due to an emergency or disaster, or day-to-day damage), those repairs are also more lengthy and complex, which could create additional delays after a disaster.

In a storm event, high winds can cause failure to our above-ground infrastructure – such as our substations and transmission towers – making underground distribution lines still susceptible to outages when the wind start to blow. For areas such as subdivisions where distribution infrastructure is already underground, they can still be affected by issues at our substation.

While the number of outages may decrease with an underground distribution system, the length of time customers are without power will typically be longer. That’s because it’s more difficult to locate the cause of an outage related to an underground line. Repairs are often more complex with underground lines, given their close proximity to other utility infrastructure and the need to use excavating equipment. We see this sometimes in urban areas when underground lines are occasionally damaged during residential and commercial construction projects, if underground cables are struck during excavation. Those outages tend to be longer and require more extensive repairs than day-to-day outages to our overhead distribution lines.

The same is true when it comes to maintenance: while the lines may need maintenance less often, when it’s required, it would also be more costly and typically take longer.



#889 Mike K.

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 04:10 PM

When we say “developer,” we actually mean the home purchaser, business operator or renter.

If the cost is $400,000 for the Bowker’s frontage, that equals $9,300 per residence.
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#890 gstc84

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 04:21 PM

Perhaps a bit off topic......
How much are people asking for parking spaces to rent if they don't use them in new condos? Downtown, Upper Fort etc


I’m on View St, kind of right on the border between Downtown and Harris Green neighbourhoods, and am renting mine for $125/mo. I tried $150 last year but people kept backing out after two months and finding something cheaper. $125 hasn’t posed any problems.

#891 IPH

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 04:22 PM

that's exactly right Mike, but only a hand full of units on the upper floors on the south side of the building will really benefit from moving them underground.  Those on other sides of the building or lower floors don't care if the lines are above or underground.  So its really more like $40K per unit that is impacted.  Abstract decided that it was unlikely they could charge $40K more for each of those units if the lines were underground so didn't do it. 


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#892 IPH

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 04:27 PM

I personally think the developer should be required to do it.

So if Hydro shows up in front of your place tomorrow and tells you there putting the lines underground but you own them $10-20K I guess you'll happily write the check with no complaints then!


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#893 G-Man

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Posted 17 January 2020 - 10:19 PM

When we say “developer,” we actually mean the home purchaser, business operator or renter.

If the cost is $400,000 for the Bowker’s frontage, that equals $9,300 per residence.


We make developers build new sidewalks, we should be doing the same with wires. They are unsightly. I also thin the City should have taken advantage of the bike lane construction to do the same along Fort Street.
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