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Electric and autonomous cars in Victoria and on Vancouver Island


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#4301 laconic

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Posted 19 October 2019 - 09:25 AM

i think we all presume charging times will come down.  

 

Charging time won't come down with level 2 chargers. That standard is not going to change. Level 2 chargers are just fine and relatively cheap for residential use. They're not good for places where there are many people wanting to charge.

 

Charging time with level 3 chargers is much better. Rather than 5-ish hours to charge 200k, you can do it in around a half hour. Those chargers are currently fairly expensive, plus they require a substantially better electrical infrastructure. The biggest problem with them is that they don't quite meet the gas-and-go mentality. A half hour or more is a long time to wait, but if you leave your car then you're messing up any else who want to use it. Look for these chargers to start charging a fee if you don't move on pretty quickly.



#4302 Mike K.

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Posted 19 October 2019 - 09:28 AM

Yes, those fees are coming and they’ll be a very rude awakening for people sold on the idea of free power for their investments.

And just wait until road taxes are applied to every charge to the tune of $30 for per fill-up like Honda Civic drivers are currently paying.

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#4303 G-Man

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Posted 19 October 2019 - 10:28 AM

Not sure there is any coal generation power we can pull from. Supply only travels so far.

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#4304 Matt R.

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Posted 19 October 2019 - 11:31 AM

What if we burn more garbage?  We already burn a lot.  Remember those containers of garbage Canada shipped overseas and then took back?  

 

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#4305 Mike K.

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Posted 19 October 2019 - 04:09 PM

Not sure there is any coal generation power we can pull from. Supply only travels so far.


Centralia south of Seattle puts out more power than Site C!
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#4306 Matt R.

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Posted 19 October 2019 - 07:44 PM

Half of its coal powered boilers are shutting down next year, and the other half in 2025. Then what?

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#4307 Mike K.

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Posted 20 October 2019 - 05:45 AM

Higher electricity rates.

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#4308 LJ

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Posted 20 October 2019 - 08:01 PM

Nuclear!!!


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#4309 Mike K.

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Posted 30 October 2019 - 07:56 AM

I'm not sure if this is good news, or very, very bad news.

 

From UVic:

 

All-electric BC transport economical, thanks to low-cost renewables
If all vehicles in British Columbia were powered by electricity instead of liquid fuels by 2055, BC would need to more than double its electricity generation capacity to meet forecasted energy demand—and the move could prove surprisingly cost-effective.

 

The finding comes from a team of University of Victoria researchers with the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions (PICS), and will be published in the November issue of Applied Energy.

 

By 2055, BC will need to increase its electrical production capacity from a 2015 baseline of 15.6 gigawatts (GW) to 23 GW to meet forecast economic and population growth. Factor in all-electric road transportation as well, and up to 60 per cent additional capacity will be needed. This would more than double BC’s electricity generation capacity to 37 GW.

 

Surprisingly, the cost of generating the extra electricity would be relatively cheap.

 

Crunching the numbers, the team found that the 60 per cent capacity boost for transport would raise the average unit cost of electricity by only nine per cent due to availability of low cost, renewable energy options. Furthermore, the costs would only rise by five per cent if at least half of drivers charged their vehicles at off-peak times. Spreading the demand means less need for capacity build-out.

 

Co-author Curran Crawford, a member of the PICS Transportation Futures for BC project and a professor with UVic’s Institute for Integrated Energy Systems, says low-carbon generation options such as wind and solar power would keep a lid on energy prices. “Our modelling shows that electrification of transport systems, and a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs), can be achieved at relatively low additional cost to the electricity system,” he says.

 

Under BC’s current Clean Energy Act, at least 93 per cent of grid electricity must come from renewable resources such as hydropower, wind or solar. Crawford says as long as that policy remains in place, electrifying the entire road fleet would reduce total emissions from the combined transportation and electricity sectors by 38 per cent (or 260 MtCO2) between 2015 and 2055, relative to business as usual.

 

“Transportation is responsible for more than a third of BC’s total GHG emissions; the CleanBC plan rightly envisages transitioning BC’s cars, SUVs, buses and truck fleets away from fossil fuels to clean electricity, which will make a huge contribution towards meeting provincial GHG reduction targets,” says Crawford.

 

“BC’s planned Site C project will provide 1.1 GW, but it just scratches the surface of potential increased power and energy needs, as this research shows. Solar photovoltaic and wind power look very promising for BC due to their falling costs.”

 

In Electrification of road transportation with utility-controlled charging: A case study for British Columbia with a 93% renewable electricity target, researchers also noted that regions with a similar hydroelectricity share to BC, such as Quebec, Northern Europe and South America, would likely find similar results in terms of cost-effective electrification of transport.

 

PICS develops impactful, evidence-based climate change solutions through collaborative partnerships which connect solution seekers with experts from BC’s four leading research universities. PICS is hosted and led by the UVic in collaboration with the University of British Columbia, Simon Fraser University and the University of Northern British Columbia.


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#4310 RFS

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Posted 30 October 2019 - 07:59 AM

^this is why opposition to site C utterly exposed so called environmentalists as irrational ideologues. IMO the NDP and their supporters lost massive credibility on that file.

#4311 Mike K.

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Posted 30 October 2019 - 08:06 AM

Indeed. A year ago we "didn't need it." Today Site C "just scratches the surface."

 

Now they're promising us solar power (which doesn't work when its dark) and wind power (which doesn't work when there's no wind) "would keep a lid on energy prices."

 

Btw, my mechanic and I were chatting about electric vehicles yesterday and he said he had a customer come in with a Nissan Leaf that needed a new master cylinder (it's the key component of a car's braking system). Even for my F-350 the replacement cost, with labour, is $300, give or take. For the leaf? $4,000. And the job couldn't be done by the shop, it had to go to Nissan. What sort of technology are they using in these things where one of the most basic, tried-and-true components of a vehicle requires a $4,000 replacement cost? So much for that gas savings.


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#4312 Mike K.

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Posted 30 October 2019 - 08:15 AM

Site C: 1.1GW

 

UVic researchers say we need 37GW by 2055. We currently generate 15.6GW.

 

20 Site C's-worth of energy, essentially, will be required by 2055. And that's not including existing infrastructure that could be forced to reduce output as it ages or in some cases be shut down (like Jordan River's hydro dam).


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#4313 lanforod

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Posted 30 October 2019 - 08:28 AM

Indeed. A year ago we "didn't need it." Today Site C "just scratches the surface."

 

Now they're promising us solar power (which doesn't work when its dark) and wind power (which doesn't work when there's no wind) "would keep a lid on energy prices."

 

Btw, my mechanic and I were chatting about electric vehicles yesterday and he said he had a customer come in with a Nissan Leaf that needed a new master cylinder (it's the key component of a car's braking system). Even for my F-350 the replacement cost, with labour, is $300, give or take. For the leaf? $4,000. And the job couldn't be done by the shop, it had to go to Nissan. What sort of technology are they using in these things where one of the most basic, tried-and-true components of a vehicle requires a $4,000 replacement cost? So much for that gas savings.

 

Regenerative braking maybe?


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#4314 Mike K.

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Posted 30 October 2019 - 08:32 AM

That makes a lot of sense, actually.


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#4315 sebberry

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Posted 30 October 2019 - 09:37 AM

Regenerative braking maybe?

 

 

That makes a lot of sense, actually.

 

 

I don't know what regenerative braking has to do with the master cylinder.  Regen should be done through the drive motor, no?


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#4316 Mike K.

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Posted 30 October 2019 - 09:47 AM

Looking at the actual part it looks far more complicated than a traditional setup, so it must have something to do with the regenerative system.

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#4317 Mike K.

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Posted 30 October 2019 - 09:53 AM

Looking at Used Victoria listings I don’t think there is any other vehicle in our local used car market that beats the Leaf for volume of 10-year-old or newer inventory. I just counted 50! All used. Some guy is also hoping for a battery pack he’s willing to pay $500 for. Yikes.

And they’re not cheap, either. The prices range from $13k to $40k for the newest ones.

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#4318 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 30 October 2019 - 02:00 PM

that does seem crazy but yes it's common:

 

I took my 2011 LEAF to the dealer today because it was both time for the annual servicing and also because it had some worrisome lights related to the traction control and brakes. During their assessment of the vehicle, they found the brake master cylinder was leaking and told me it would need to be replaced at a cost of $2700, or about 28% of my car's resale value.

My LEAF is just about to hit its 5 year birthday (I got it on January 8th, 2011), has under 28,000 miles on it, and I've taken it in every year for standard servicing at a Nissan dealer.

 

 

https://mynissanleaf...pic.php?t=21203

 

The average cost for a Nissan LEAF brake master cylinder replacement is between $2,417 and $2,494. Labor costs are estimated between $290 and $367 while parts are priced at $2127. Estimate does not include taxes and fees.

 

https://repairpal.co...eplacement-cost


Edited by Victoria Watcher, 30 October 2019 - 02:01 PM.


#4319 Mike K.

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Posted 30 October 2019 - 05:12 PM

That’s in USD, right?

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#4320 Victoria Watcher

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Posted 30 October 2019 - 05:15 PM

That’s in USD, right?

 

yes those are.  

 

it still must be one hell of a thing for over $2000.  a "normal" car master cylinder costs like $300 tops.



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